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help me identify this bread

Bread

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20 replies to this topic

#1 kaneel

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 09:02 PM

Interior: Soft, rolled like a baguette, slightly sweet bread....it was white inside so i don't think it had eggs....maybe milk , maybe potatoes to enrichened

Exterior: No crust what so ever.

I was thinking portuguese bread but not sure.....

Thanks

#2 glennbech

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 01:45 AM

This is probably a Pain de mie (Crumb bread) If I remember correctly it was made by the french bakers to satisfy tourists and customers who didn't apericiate the typical hard crusted french bread. Now the french love the bread as well.

It's often made and sold in rectangular shapes. The lack of crust comes from the fact that a lot of milk and butter is used in the recipe. One recipe I found, called for about 10% butter. I think most of the liquid is milk, and the additional fat helps soften the crust even more. It also contains sugar, which can explain the sweet taste...

But more importantly.. Why do you want to know? Was it good? I'm thinking of making a batch for the Saturday breakfast, as my wife is no big fan of hard crust .-)

Rgrds,

Edited by glennbech, 28 April 2006 - 02:41 AM.


#3 Woods

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 06:00 AM

This is probably a Pain de mie  (Crumb bread) If I remember correctly it was made by the french bakers to satisfy tourists and customers who didn't apericiate the typical hard crusted french bread. Now the french love the bread as well.

It's often made and sold in rectangular shapes. The lack of crust comes from the fact that a lot of milk and butter is used in the recipe. One recipe I found, called for about 10% butter. I think most of the liquid is milk, and the  additional fat helps soften the crust even more. It also contains sugar, which can explain the sweet taste...

But more importantly.. Why do you want to know? Was it good? I'm thinking of making a batch for the Saturday breakfast, as my wife is no big fan of hard crust .-)

Rgrds,

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Actually, I think pain de mie has been around for a good while. I make it alot and it has a nice thin crust. It is used for toast and hors d'ouvres. It is a milk and butter bread that fits into the challah-brioche fine spectrum. It is not a sweet bread at all. Maybe the loaf in question is a latino variety? Woods

#4 kaneel

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 06:58 AM

Thank you both.

Glenbech, i tasted this in sandwich shop. It was great ....i love bread but i never had this type before.

#5 chiantiglace

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 06:04 PM

Could it be a sour dough farm bread?
Dean Anthony Anderson
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#6 donyeokl

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 07:08 PM

Hmmm.... seems to be Pain de Mie to me :hmmm:

Cheers...

Don
Cheers...
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#7 kaneel

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:59 AM

Could it be a sour dough farm bread?

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No, it wasn't sour dough.
I am gonna try the pain de mie or look along the lines of mexican bread.

I have a recipe that's called victorian milk bread so i am gonna give this a try, substituting lard or vegetable shortening for the butter.

#8 glennbech

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 12:07 AM

Im using this recipe for Pain de mie as we speak .-)

700 g milk
1000 g white flour
50 g sugar
30 g yeast
20 g salt
100 g butter Diced.

Mix everything together, but hold back 100g of milk. (If you're using a kitchen machine). Mix for 3 minutes. Then mix for 5 minutes adding the last of the milk. Slow down, and add the diced butter in small amounts at a time.

Let the dough rest for 1 hour, divide into three pieces, and let them rest for 20 minutes. Form loaves and rise do double size. Bake.

#9 Tepee

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 08:58 AM

Glenn, any plans to convert this to sourdough? Think I'll give it a go this week.
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#10 glennbech

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 10:51 AM

A Sourdough "Pain de mie" could be interesting, I'm looking forward to hearing about your results! The "Sweetness" in the pan de mie might work well the the sour element of sourdough. Go for it ! :-)

In the mean time; This his how my Pan de mie turned out. It's glazed with an egg and sprinkled with sesame seeds.


Posted Image

It tasted great! (especially if you're a sweet tooth.) Almost no crust, buttery, and very soft and spongy crumb. I would really recommend the recipe. I couldn't bake it last night, so It spent the night in the fridge. It actually rose almost 100%.
(Yeast sure is forgiving when it comes to rising)

... Proofed it for an additional hour or so after I took it out of the fridge, and baked at 200c for about 45 minutes.

Edited by glennbech, 30 April 2006 - 10:52 AM.


#11 kaneel

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 02:08 PM

A Sourdough "Pain de mie" could be interesting, I'm looking forward to hearing about your results! The "Sweetness" in the pan de mie might work well the the sour element of sourdough. Go for it ! :-)

In the mean time; This his how my Pan de mie turned out. It's glazed with an egg and sprinkled with sesame seeds.


Posted Image

It tasted great!  (especially if you're a sweet tooth.) Almost no crust, buttery, and very soft and spongy crumb. I would really recommend the recipe.  I couldn't bake it last night, so It spent the night in the fridge. It actually rose almost 100%.
(Yeast sure is forgiving when it comes to rising)

... Proofed it for an additional hour or so after I took it out of the fridge, and baked at 200c for about 45 minutes.

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That looks great glennbech!!!
Thanks for posting the recipe......i am making this next.

#12 Tepee

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 07:42 PM

Glenn, I made the sourdough version of your pain de mie last night. It was DELICIOUS; half the loaf disappeared in no time. Very soft crumb with a very thin crust, crispy last night, soft this morning. Here's what I did:

Half of Glenn's wonderful recipe:

Preferment:
1T starter
100g bread flour
100g water
This puffed up to 4 times its volume in 7 hrs.

Dough:
250g milk
200g bread flour
200g plain flour
50g melted unsalted butter
10g celtic salt
25g sugar

3 short kneads/rests within 30 mins
2 fold/turns within 2 hrs
Shape and into the fridge for half an hour

Oven 230 C for 15 mins, 190 C for 30 mins.

Posted Image
Posted Image

Edited by Tepee, 02 May 2006 - 07:45 PM.

TPcal!
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Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#13 melonpan

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 10:32 PM

that looks lovely tepee

Edited by melonpan, 02 May 2006 - 10:32 PM.

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#14 glennbech

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 12:53 AM

Speechless!!

Can you elaborate on how you got the crust so evenly coloured (Eggs?) and the loaf so round in shape. What kind of "pan" is used ?

I'll have to try this for myself now... .-)

Respect :-)

Rgrds.

#15 Tepee

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 01:07 AM

Tks, melonpan and Glenn.

Glenn:

I washed the top with milk just before putting it in the oven.

Dough was shaped and plonked into a small non-stick but oiled loaf tin.

The roundness is due to 'oven spring'. The dough was just at the level of the top of the tin but shot up immediately in the oven. The tin was placed on a tile at the bottom of the oven preheated as hot as my oven could go (didn't measure the temp but should be around 230C) for 40 mins. BTW, my oven is electric fan-assisted.

Yes, do try it. Love the taste/texture. Tks again for the 'original' recipe.

Edited by Tepee, 03 May 2006 - 01:14 AM.

TPcal!
Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#16 glennbech

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 01:37 AM

It's just amazing how the crust holds without cracking up! Must be all that milk fat and butter doing it's work .-)

Another thing; I have a electrc fan assisted oven as well. Do you use the fan when baking? I usually burn stuff when using the fan, so I've avoided it so far for baking.

#17 glennbech

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 01:39 AM

.... I also found another good reason for trying this. I still remember one negative thing about the original recipe -> The taste of the yeast. Now I have have to try it with sourdough .-)

#18 Tepee

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 03:43 AM

One of the reasons why I make sourdough is, I, too, don't like the yeast taste of non-SD breads.

Yes, I do use the fan; I've noted down the timing in the re-written recipe but here it is again....Oven 230 C for 15 mins, 190 C for 30 mins. With the fan, the oven is hotter, just nice to push the bread up.
TPcal!
Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#19 glennbech

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 04:21 AM

"200g bread flour" what is this ? Stronger flour ? Vitamin C added ?

Another thing; Any ideas on how to keep the dough and pre-ferment at about 30c during the day? I've been experimenting with placing a thermometer all around my apartment. Drafty windows, and a cold Norwegian Spring makes "room temperature" about 20-22c.... Not Ideal for baking :-)

#20 Tepee

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 04:43 AM

Bread flour is strong flour. Protein level for this one is 11.8%. Don't see any other additives.

LOL...proving temperatures? I've the exact opposite problem. With our hot climate, things happen too fast....my challenge is to slow it down. There's been some discussion on how to maintain the ideal temperature in a few threads. Here's one.
TPcal!
Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#21 miladyinsanity

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 06:36 AM

Bread flour is strong flour. Protein level for this one is 11.8%. Don't see any other additives.

LOL...proving temperatures? I've the exact opposite problem. With our hot climate, things happen too fast....my challenge is to slow it down. There's been some discussion on how to maintain the ideal temperature in a few threads. Here's one.

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:laugh: That's exactly the problem I had when I made a loaf of bread awhile back.

Glennbech, a microwave (if you have the kind that has a light that switches on when you open it) works just fine.
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