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Sweeteners in ice cream


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#31 Terrasanct

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 08:24 PM

I got that CI magazine and read the report about vanilla ice creams. Interesting.

I'm still on the ice cream kick--today I made a great sugar free chocolate that was so smooth and creamy. Very rich, too. I imagine it will turn into a solid block of ice, but after an hour or two in the freezer it was still quite scoopable. I served it with brandied cherries, whipped cream, and a few thin ginger cookies. It was worth the 20 or so dishes it took to produce.

The ice cream had a custard base, which I really do prefer, with cocoa and semisweet chocolate added. I used MiniCarb chocolate chips, which do have some polydextrose in them, but no sugar alcohols.

I'm really liking my Cuisinart ice cream maker--it's so much easier not to have to bother with the salt and ice. Plus the advantage of being able to see and taste the ice cream without stopping the machine.

#32 scott123

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 09:56 AM

I got that CI magazine and read the report about vanilla ice creams.  Interesting. 

I'm still on the ice cream kick--today I made a great sugar free chocolate that was so smooth and creamy.  Very rich, too.  I imagine it will turn into a solid block of ice, but after an hour or two in the freezer it was still quite scoopable.  I served it with brandied cherries, whipped cream, and a few thin ginger cookies.  It was worth the 20 or so dishes it took to produce. 

The ice cream had a custard base, which I really do prefer, with cocoa and semisweet chocolate added.  I used MiniCarb chocolate chips, which do have some polydextrose in them, but no sugar alcohols.

I'm really liking my Cuisinart ice cream maker--it's so much easier not to have to bother with the salt and ice.  Plus the advantage of being able to see and taste the ice cream without stopping the machine.

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Care to share your recipe?

#33 Terrasanct

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 11:05 AM

Here is the original (and I don't know where it's from so I hope I'm not violating any copyright laws):

Chocolate Ice Cream


Recipe:

2 cups (480 ml) half-and-half
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons (50 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 vanilla bean or 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
2 ounces (55 grams) semisweet chocolate, chopped
4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated white sugar


In a small saucepan gradually whisk together the half and half and the cocoa powder until it is a smooth paste. Place over medium-high heat and bring the half-and-half cocoa mixture and the vanilla bean (if using) to the scalding point (the milk begins to foam up). Remove from heat, take out the vanilla bean and scrape the seeds from the bean with the back of a knife, and mix the seeds back into the half-and-half. Add the chopped chocolate and stir until the chocolate has completely melted and is smooth.

Meanwhile in a stainless steel bowl beat the egg yolks and sugar until light and fluffy (about two minutes). You can do this with a wire whisk or I like to use a hand mixer. Gradually pour the scalding half-and-half mixture into the whipped egg yolk mixture, making sure you keep whisking constantly so the eggs don't curdle. If any lumps do form, strain the mixture first before heating.

Place the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water and, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, cook until the custard thickens enough that it coats the back of a spoon (170 degrees F) (77 degrees C). The term 'coat a spoon' is a technique used mainly as a way to test when an egg-based custard or sauce is done. A spoon, usually wooden, is placed in the custard and, when the spoon is raised, the film of custard on the back of the spoon will stay in place even when you draw a line with your finger through the middle of the custard.

Immediately remove the custard from the heat and continue to stir the custard for a few minutes so it does not overcook. At this point stir in the vanilla extract, if using. Cover and let cool to room temperature and then refrigerate the custard until it is completely cold (several hours but preferably overnight).

Transfer the cold custard to the container of your ice cream machine and process according to the manufacturer's instructions. Once made, transfer the ice cream to a chilled container and store in the freezer. If the ice cream becomes too hard place in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes before serving so it can soften.


*********

Here are the changes I made:

For the semisweet chocolate I used MiniCarb chocolate chips, no sugar alcohols. I used regular old Hersheys cocoa, since it's what I always have. Sugar I replaced with Splenda and a pinch of SteviaPlus, to taste. I added a pinch of salt, which really enhanced the flavor--I think I'd add the salt even for the original recipe. I weighed everything, and used the vanilla bean, not the extract.

I strained after cooking, because it made more sense to me. I couldn't get it up to 170 but it was cooked enough and plenty thick.

My husband said, after tasting it, "You've just restored my faith in ice cream." So I think he liked it.

For the brandied cherries, I used some bing cherries from my freezer, added Splenda, a bit of orange juice, and some brandy, heated, thickened with cornstarch, added a bit of vanilla and a little more brandy to taste. The ice cream was so rich it really did need something served with it.

#34 lancastermike

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 12:45 PM

I spent the better part of a year trying to make a good sugar free ice cream for my wife. I made lots of stuff that tasted good. However, no matter what combination of sweetener I used I could not get a decent scoopable ice cream. Lots and lots of hard as a rock stuff. I still have som eoif the -tols and stevis and glycerin and other stuff. Now, I just don't make it as much, and when I do I use the real deal.

#35 scott123

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 02:51 PM

Here is the original (and I don't know where it's from so I hope I'm not violating any copyright laws):

Chocolate Ice Cream


So you opted against experimenting with the polyd/erythritol?

The Minicarb chips, btw, are polydextrose based, so those gave you a little bit of freezing point depression.

#36 scott123

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 02:56 PM

I spent the better part of a year trying to make a good sugar free ice cream for my wife. I made lots of stuff that tasted good. However, no matter what combination of sweetener I used I could not get a decent scoopable ice cream.  Lots and lots of hard as a rock stuff. I still have som eoif the -tols and stevis and glycerin and other stuff.  Now, I just don't make it as much, and when I do I use the real deal.

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You've got the wrong -tols. Erythritol has the smallest size of all the -tols and, because of this, has the greatest freezing point depression capabilities. Polydextrose helps to keep the erythritol dissolved.

That's all you need for great sugar free ice cream. If you would have had those two ingredients, it would have been a piece of cake.

#37 scott123

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 02:56 PM

I spent the better part of a year trying to make a good sugar free ice cream for my wife. I made lots of stuff that tasted good. However, no matter what combination of sweetener I used I could not get a decent scoopable ice cream.  Lots and lots of hard as a rock stuff. I still have som eoif the -tols and stevis and glycerin and other stuff.  Now, I just don't make it as much, and when I do I use the real deal.

View Post


You were working with the wrong -tols. Erythritol has the smallest size of all the -tols and, because of this, has the greatest freezing point depression capabilities. Polydextrose helps to keep the erythritol dissolved.

That's all you need for great sugar free ice cream. If you would have had those two ingredients, it would have been a piece of cake.

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#38 Terrasanct

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 04:48 PM

Yeah, I know the chocolate chips have polydextrose, but there is such a small amount in the recipe that I doubt it made much difference in the texture. I wondered if that would have any effect.

I am going to do some experiments with polyD and erythritol but so far it hasn't seemed any big deal to defrost the container for a few seconds in the microwave. And I've been making small batches, too.

#39 Athena1963

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 07:15 PM

Would adding some sugar-free or unflavored gelatin help keep a softer texture? Just a tablespoon or so dissolved in the custard base would probably do it. Are you able to have barley malt syrup? That might work too.

#40 Terrasanct

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 07:46 PM

The gelatin might be worth a try but I wonder what effect it would have in the ice cream. I know it is used in some recipes without eggs. I just read the On Food and Cooking section on ice cream as suggested and it sounds like emulsifiers are the important part here. Since egg yolks act as emulsifiers, I wonder what effect it would have to add more of them in a custard base?