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Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques

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#151 cmflick

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:59 PM

I just use the Bounty paper towels that I have in the house, but in Belgium we used the blue ones, which were strong and more like a woven piece of fabric.

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I wonder if the ones used in Belgium were anything like these:
click

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Hmmm. I get a link to the Canadian Tire Corporation with that link, but I don't see anything about paper towels!

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Interesting - I checked it before I posted and just checked it again and it works fine for me. If you can get to CT then do a search for "shop towels".

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If you don't already have their cookies on your computer, the link leads to a 'Welcome' splash page where they ask that you put in your postal code. I just copied the sample one and pasted into the field. You're then taken to the Shop Towels page.

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Thanks, John. I used the sample postal code like you suggested and it took me right to the paper towel page. I think that I have seen these in stores, so I'll have to check them out.

#152 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 07:29 PM

Posted Image

Posted Image

Some of my splatter experiments from the weekend. I splattered first with red, then dark pink, then light pink. I suspect starting with the lightest and working to the darkest might have been a more interesting effect.

Because I didn't have that extra body around to wipe the molds I heated the molds and wiped and scraped afterwards. You can see in the first picture on one of the hearts on the left, how some of the splatter got melted - making a different effect. I was worried that the heating might cause some unmolding problems - but the ones that got melted a bit came out just as well or better than some of the others.

#153 John DePaula

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 08:05 PM

Oooo, I love those! Interesting, that melty splatter is nice, too!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#154 mostlylana

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 11:09 PM

Nice splatter Kerry! Wow!

#155 cmflick

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 06:27 AM

Very, very cool. I love the splatters. The white chocolate (I assume that's what the shells are) really set off the splatters.

I'm not sure that I understand it when you say "I heated the molds and wiped and scraped afterwards". Did you finish your spraying, then hit the molds with the heat gun before wiping off the over spray? I just have terrible luck with unmolding if I use the heat gun (or in my case, hair dryer) once I have cocoa butter or chocolate in the molds.

#156 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 07:05 AM

Very, very cool.  I love the splatters.  The white chocolate (I assume that's what the shells are) really set off the splatters.

I'm not sure that I understand it when you say "I heated the molds and wiped and scraped afterwards".  Did you finish your spraying, then hit the molds with the heat gun before wiping off the over spray?  I just have terrible luck with unmolding if I use the heat gun (or in my case, hair dryer) once I have cocoa butter or chocolate in the molds.

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These ones have a bit of white sprayed behind the splatters, but they are molded in white chocolate as well.

So to get rid of the overspray, because I didn't wipe as I went along, I reheated the molds later that day with the heat gun, trying to just soften the overspray, not the inside of the cavities. That was why I had a little 'meltage' inside some of the cavities - but it turned out OK - I probably just got lucky.

#157 RobertM

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 09:20 AM

I recently had the opportunity to meet the Tomric corporate Pastry Chef, Brian Donaghy who has produced some amazingly nice pieces of chocolate. In discussing his airbrushed pieces he uses a Badger 250 airbrush and an Iwata Smart Jet compressor. He sprays his colors at 92 degrees Farenheit.

I notice most of you are using larger spary guns - such as John DePaula with a Fuji XT-2. Has anyone tried using the smaller units, such as the Badger? Also, everyone here seems to be coloring their own cocoa butter, but there are pre-colored butters available, has anyone tried using these pre-done colors? (Chef Rubber has some amazing colors).

I'm seriously wanting to start practicing with spraying cocoa butters/chocolate - and really appreciate this entire topic in the forum. Just wondering what type of system to purchase -

Brian was also showing a fun effect - spraying colored cocoa butter on COLD chocolate produces a texture almost like "flocking" - Brian was spraying some molded easter bunnies - and the effects of spraying on the cold chocolate was really interesting. Can't wait to try it - perhaps this weekend as DC is scheduled for some nasty weather -

#158 RobertM

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 09:30 AM

I hope I won't get into copyright troubles but here is the information from Tomric on the use of colors...

Color 101:

These easy and ready to use colored cocoa butters, can be used in many different ways to color your chocolates or create your own confectionery designs. Use with a brush, airbrush or hand paint as shown below.



Steps 1-4:

Warm New World Chocolate Colored Cocoa Butters to 85 and 90 degrees farenheight. (Gold, white and purple.) Using finger, swipe gold in one direction inside each cavity of mold.Turn mold around and swipe using purple.



Steps 5-8:

Using airbrush, spray a thin coating of white into cavities. Create cavities using tempered chocolate.Fill cavities and insert roasted almond. Cap pieces and refrigerate until piece is able to be removed from mold.

Made in the USA - FDA Approved colors

Sorry the pictures did not copy/paste into the reply - if interested, follow this link:
http://www.tomric.co...tle=FeatureMore

#159 cmflick

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 09:39 AM

I recently had the opportunity to meet the Tomric corporate Pastry Chef, Brian Donaghy who has produced some amazingly nice pieces of chocolate.  In discussing his airbrushed pieces he uses a Badger 250 airbrush and an Iwata Smart Jet compressor.  He sprays his colors at 92 degrees Farenheit. 

I notice most of you are using larger spary guns - such as John DePaula with a Fuji XT-2.  Has anyone tried using the smaller units, such as the Badger?  Also, everyone here seems to be coloring their own cocoa butter, but there are pre-colored butters available, has anyone tried using these pre-done colors?  (Chef Rubber has some amazing colors).

I'm seriously wanting to start practicing with spraying cocoa butters/chocolate - and really appreciate this entire topic in the forum.  Just wondering what type of system to purchase -

Brian was also showing a fun effect - spraying colored cocoa butter on COLD chocolate produces a texture almost like "flocking" - Brian was spraying some molded easter bunnies - and the effects of spraying on the cold chocolate was really interesting.  Can't wait to try it - perhaps this weekend as DC is scheduled for some nasty weather -

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I just got my Badger 250 airbrush late last fall after reading a lot of eG posts! Most of my colored cocoa butters are from Chef Rubber. I especially like the ones from their "jewel" collection that have a real shimmer to them. Before airbrushing, I used the Chef Rubber colors a lot for finger painting and brushing into molds. You can't beat the Badger 250 for the money. I got mine on Ebay for $20! I'm still studying compressors at this point. I just can't decide. Meanwhile, I'm using Badger canned air, which gets pretty expensive after a while, and comes with a whole set of problems of its own.

Edited by cmflick, 27 January 2009 - 09:42 AM.


#160 RobertM

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 10:13 AM

Is there a reason to use such a large HVLP spray gun as the Fuji?

#161 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:01 AM

Is there a reason to use such a large HVLP spray gun as the Fuji?

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The main difference I find between the Badger and the Fuji is the amount of aerosolized cocoa butter in the air when I'm done. With the Badger I am covered with a fine mist in just a few minutes. Before the Fuji I dreaded airbrushing.

#162 mostlylana

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:09 AM

Is there a reason to use such a large HVLP spray gun as the Fuji?

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With the pressurized cup you can easily do effects as well...

#163 cmflick

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:16 AM

Is there a reason to use such a large HVLP spray gun as the Fuji?

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The main difference I find between the Badger and the Fuji is the amount of aerosolized cocoa butter in the air when I'm done. With the Badger I am covered with a fine mist in just a few minutes. Before the Fuji I dreaded airbrushing.

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Ditto the aerosoling with a Badger. What I really notice is that my glasses get a film of cocoa butter on them pretty quickly when I use my Badger!

#164 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:21 AM

I have 4 airbrushes/sprayguns for chocolate - the Badger 250, another Badger I can't recall the number of (that I bought because it could splatter - theoretically) and Iwata (never worked worth a shit with chocolate) and now the Fuji.

The Fuji is the only one I suspect I'll ever use again.

#165 John DePaula

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 12:51 PM

And I'll just throw my 2¢ : When I used my Badger airbrush, aerosolized chocolate everywhere, including my glasses.

With the Fuji, nowhere but my spray booth i.e. not on me. Yay!

Edited by John DePaula, 27 January 2009 - 12:52 PM.

John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#166 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 08:22 PM

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Here's the multicoloured splatter with milk chocolate.

#167 mostlylana

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 09:18 PM

Wow - fantastic! I wish we all lived closer together so we could play together. :rolleyes: I would love to watch you do those.

#168 John DePaula

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 10:32 PM

Yes, I agree... really awesome!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#169 cmflick

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Posted 28 January 2009 - 06:02 AM

Very nice. They look like marble!

I noticed that you've done a lot of "splatter" with your new spraygun. Can you do fine spraying as well?

#170 Kerry Beal

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Posted 28 January 2009 - 06:25 AM

Very nice.  They look like marble!

I noticed that you've done a lot of "splatter" with your new spraygun.  Can you do fine spraying as well?

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Sure can - but I'm in my 'splatter phase' right now. This gun brings out my inner Jackson Pollock.

If you look at the first experiments I did - I splattered with dark chocolate and then did a fine spray with pink and silver.

I was fooling around with my frog and mice molds this trip - it takes me so long to paint to get the effect I like on them, so I am holding out hope that spraying them will be more efficient. I got a nice shiny surface - but it's all the same - so I'm not sure how to adjust the spray to get what I want. I may end up with splattered frogs and mice too!

#171 cmflick

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Posted 29 January 2009 - 09:05 AM



I have a question... once you've sprayed, how do you remove the overspray from the mold?  Scrape while wet?  Wipe while wet?  Scrape when dry?

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Ideally I wipe while wet - with paper towels laid flat, I just place the mold face down and push it across the surface.


Kerry, thanks for the tip on how to clean off the overspray. I tried it this morning with ordinary kitchen paper towels and it worked like a charm. It makes clean up later a whole lot easier.

Edited by cmflick, 29 January 2009 - 09:05 AM.


#172 rubyred

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 08:24 PM

I've only had a chance to read through the first three pages of this topic, which have been absolutely illuminating! I'm going to read through the rest when I have more time, but til then I have a question:

Has anyone tried using a hobby paint sprayer (the sort used to paint model cars, etc.) with chocolate? I'm more or less experimenting at this point, so the $15 price tag is very appealing compared to hardware store prices! Specifically, I want to try the Alinea recipe 'LIQUID CHOCOLATE, Chicory, Dandelion, Banana, which calls for coating a frozen chocolate square with chocolate spray.

I'm curious to hear what everyone has to say about it. It seems to me that, in the absence of any other trials with this product, $15 almost makes the hobby sprayer disposable, if only to report back on my findings!

#173 prairiegirl

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 08:38 PM

Request for an update: How does the Fugi (Kerry)differ from the Walmec(Lana)?
I use a Badger Universal for airbrushing. I can't do splatters but it is safer than the aerosol can. Has anyone tried the JLP that Kerry provided the link? This one has the heated head. I know that DC Duby uses a heated airbrush. I am unsure of which is the best all round airbrush to use. I like the idea of a heated head as the clogging can be annoying! Please continue to educate me.
Thanks.
deb.

#174 Serj

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 11:19 PM

Has anyone tried using a hobby paint sprayer (the sort used to paint model cars, etc.) with chocolate?


I have found it comes out a little sloppy. It's hard to get the nice even distribution- lots of splotches. Obviously you get what you pay for! :)

#175 Serj

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 11:20 PM

Or maybe it's just me! :)

Edited by Serj, 27 March 2009 - 11:20 PM.


#176 rubyred

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 06:13 PM

Has anyone tried using a hobby paint sprayer (the sort used to paint model cars, etc.) with chocolate?


I have found it comes out a little sloppy. It's hard to get the nice even distribution- lots of splotches. Obviously you get what you pay for! :)

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I had a feeling that might be the case. Thanks, Serj!

#177 schneich

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Posted 15 April 2009 - 01:24 AM

we use three different airbrush sizes, a small paasche external mixer, a bigger gun usually used for car paint jobs, and a wagner airless. since my first career was in graphic design, i used to do airbush illustrations and photo retouching long before photoshop became an option. the thing that john mentioned when he uses his small airbrush is called "overspray" and it occurs if your pressure level is way to high, all you have to do is turning the pressure down a bit. i like to work with the paasche because it gives me a great control over what iam doing. i can do color transitions, lines, polka dots, and even use some paper maskings for cool marble like effects. the big guns are way to big for that kind of control. if i find the time i do some demo shells, so you caan see what i mean :-)
btw. a few weeks ago we had the advanced chocolates course at callebaut with jp wybauw. it was just cool. i put the pics up as soon as i find some time...


cheers

t.
toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#178 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 April 2009 - 04:09 AM

we use three different airbrush sizes, a small paasche external mixer, a bigger gun usually used for car paint jobs, and a wagner airless. since my first career was in graphic design, i used to do airbush illustrations and photo retouching long before photoshop became an option. the thing that john mentioned when he uses his small airbrush is called "overspray" and it occurs if your pressure level is way to high, all you have to do is turning the pressure down a bit.  i like to work with the paasche because it gives me a great control over what iam doing. i can do color transitions, lines, polka dots, and even use some paper maskings for cool marble like effects. the big guns are way to big for that kind of control. if i find the time i do some demo shells, so you caan see what i mean :-)
btw. a few weeks ago we had the advanced chocolates course at callebaut with jp wybauw. it was just cool. i put the pics up as soon as i find some time...


cheers

t.

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Can't wait to see both the demo and the JPW stuff!

#179 Lior

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 12:41 AM

yes, me 2!!

#180 tomdarch

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 04:08 PM

I've only had a chance to read through the first three pages of this topic, which have been absolutely illuminating!  I'm going to read through the rest when I have more time, but til then I have a question:

Has anyone tried using a hobby paint sprayer (the sort used to paint model cars, etc.) with chocolate?  I'm more or less experimenting at this point, so the $15 price tag is very appealing compared to hardware store prices!  Specifically, I want to try the Alinea recipe 'LIQUID CHOCOLATE, Chicory, Dandelion, Banana, which calls for coating a frozen chocolate square with chocolate spray.

I'm curious to hear what everyone has to say about it.  It seems to me that, in the absence of any other trials with this product, $15 almost makes the hobby sprayer disposable, if only to report back on my findings!

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Basically, I'm looking for the same thing. In the Alinea recipe, there is a chocolate preparation that's liquid around room temperature. That preparation is frozen into a block, then the frozen block is sprayed with a semi-thick layer of chocolate on all sides that will remain solid at room temperature. The sprayed surface in the photo is beyond "velvet" - it's verging on "popcorn" - splattery and textured, but even. This sprayed block is allowed to come to room temperature and is served (with all the other "accessories") on the edge of a bowl, so that the diner breaks the outer layer of sprayed chocolate, and the liquid interior runs out into the bowl.

Here's a photo of the dish before the sprayed "block" is broken open for the liquid contents to run out onto the plate.
http://farm1.static...._bcbd16a545.jpg
In the book, the lighting makes the evenly splattered surface pretty clear. Functionally, though, the splatter doesn't matter. The important thing is that the outer layer is thick enough to contain the liquid center.

For most of us "Alinea at home" folks, buying a serious HVLP spray system is probably out of the question. We're looking for a way to get that outer layer of sprayed chocolate onto the frozen "core" block. I don't have the book with me, or I'd give you some idea of what the spraying chocolate is like in terms of ingredients/mix/quantity.

One issue I see with the small air brushes is that in order to coat several blocks, you would need a fair amount of chocolate. The tiny paint pot may be impractical.

I had thought that I could pour/paint on the outer coating, but that isn't nearly as pretty or "authentic." :biggrin:





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