Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

San Francisco Lounges


  • Please log in to reply
114 replies to this topic

#61 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 13 February 2007 - 12:47 PM

One more thing about Bourbon and Branch.

Wednesday through Saturday, they have an adjunct barroom open called, "The Library" open from 6PM to 2AM.

You do need a password; but, you don't need a reservation.

The really cool part is the "sekrit" door. At the back of bourbon and branch there is a bookcase. By moving a particular book on the bookcase, the bookcase swings open to reveal The Library.

I really want one of these in my house.

The Library is a bit loud and I don't believe there are benches or seating. Still a nice place to stop by for a drink on your way to or from dinner.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#62 ChefCarey

ChefCarey
  • participating member
  • 233 posts

Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:19 PM

To get the other two, think bank and university.


Think Carlbad's got it!

Now all I have to do is figure out what a kudo is.

Guess I can offer 4 Big microseconds of fame.

As for the rest of you keep trying.

View Post


Stanford, Huntington, Hopkins and Crocker ?

#63 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 20 February 2007 - 11:35 AM

I checked out Bourbon and Branch for the first time this past Saturday. We stopped in early before our 7:30 dinner reservations.

We thought the decor and atmosphere were great. The design blends elements from the 20's/30's (pressed tin ceiling, red velvet/felt wall paper, dark wood) with modern touches (neat metal barstools (very comfortable), white-washed brick walls behind the bar, candles in niches). The period music was great as well; everything was a nice backdrop for appreciating the drinks and having a conversation. It seems to me that parties of 2-4 would work best here.)

We didn't ask our first bartender's name but he did a great job. (He looked a bit like a much better looking, younger Robert Blake... in case someone can add a name... :smile: ) I think the other bartender was Todd Smith, the bar manager at B&B, I believe, and formerly of Cortez. They both greeted us warmly and we settled down to have some fun reading the menu.

We were pleasantly surprised to get an "amuse drink" while we considered the menu which was a peach bellini variant: sparkling wine and peach. I think they may have used some type of peach cordial as the texture had a great, smooth texture that was more viscous than if peach juice were used. The peach flavor was intense, but balanced, not too sweet and I recall a pleasant slight almond/bitter flavor in there as well.

The glassware was very nice for the amuse and for all the other drinks. Another nice touch are the square, linen cocktail napkins that are slightly ruffled about the edges.

Our first two drinks were:

Elderflower 10: Tanqueray 10, elderflower syrup, lemon juice, and orange bitters (I'm not sure if I'm missing one more ingredient?)

1794: Rittenhouse Rye, Campari, Vya Red vermouth, flamed orange peel garnish

They were both excellent. I coudn't read the last ingredient I scribbled down for the Elderflower 10 (if someone knows, I'd appreciate the tip). Somehow this drink reminded me of just a great whiskey sour although it was made with gin. The tart and sweet components were perfectly balanced and the elderflower adds another elusive level of flavor. This is the best sweet and sour drink I've had. I think I read somewhere that this was a signature drink of Todd Smith's at Cortez.

The style is so different from the elderflower 10, but the 1794 was another hit. I've had this drink once before at The Range and was again very happy. The dark red color of the drink is striking. It was served in a beautiful small V-shaped glass. The flavors were so intense, but again, well balanced. As a big fan of Manhattans, Sazeracs and Negroni's this was right up my alley. I will definately be adding this to my home cocktail repertoire. I suspect that using Vya vermouth would could make a big difference.

We split a third cocktail before dinner:
Dempsey: 209 gin, calvados, pastis, grenadine
My friend and I disagreed a bit on this drink in that I found it less complex and balanced. For me, the pastis element was too overpowering. I like black licorice as a flavor element but don't ususally drink Pastis on its own so this may have been a personal bias on my part. Perhaps someone that drinks Pastis alone would pick up on the additional flavors in this cocktail. I asked our bartender about the grendadine as I don't think of grenadine adding much in terms of flavor to a drink and it didn't seem likely they would add something just for the color. I didn't catch all he said, but I understood that they actually make their own grenadine from pomegranates.

We left at about 7:15 for dinner but we actually came back to try some more drinks later on. More, in a later post.

edited to remove inadvertant addition of orange bitters to the 1794 ingredient list.

Edited by ludja, 21 February 2007 - 11:02 AM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#64 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,569 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 20 February 2007 - 01:38 PM

1794: Rittenhouse Rye, Campari, Vya Red vermouth, orange bitters, flamed orange peel

View Post


Ludja,
Any idea of the proportions in this drink? Thanks.
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#65 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 20 February 2007 - 02:36 PM

1794: Rittenhouse Rye, Campari, Vya Red vermouth, orange bitters, flamed orange peel

View Post


Ludja,
Any idea of the proportions in this drink? Thanks.

View Post

Unfortunately, I don't know. I'm not even sure if this is an older classic cocktail or a newer "classic" invention. I have also had the drink at the San Francisco restaurant, Range, but as I understand it, one of the Range bartenders is working at Bourbon and Branch so it may have been a local "transfer". I can't seem to find much information on it by googling.

Perhaps eje has tried his hand at making this cocktail at home? I think he has also sampled it at The Range and at Branch and Bourbon. Without any guidance, I guess I'd start at Negroni 1:1:1 proportions and go from there...
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#66 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 20 February 2007 - 03:02 PM

Unfortunately, I don't know.  I'm not even sure if this is an older classic cocktail or a newer "classic" invention.  I have also had the drink at the San Francisco restaurant, Range, but as I understand it, one of the Range bartenders is working at Bourbon and Branch so it may have been a local "transfer".  I can't seem to find much information on it by googling.

Perhaps eje has tried his hand at making this cocktail at home?  I think he has also sampled it at The Range and at Branch and Bourbon.  Without any guidance, I guess I'd start at Negroni 1:1:1 proportions and go from there...

View Post

Posted Image
Here's a not very great picture of the 1794 from B&B.

I've had them at Range and Bourbon and Branch.

I think it's a Thomas Waugh original that he first made at Range. I believe he may sometimes work at Bourbon and Branch; but, they have a number of new cocktails created by local and international bartenders on their menu.

I've never tried making it at home.

I would start at 2:1:1, though, as rye isn't quite as assertive as gin. At Range they make it with Old-Overholt, cinzano rosso, and campari. Stir with ice, garnish with flamed orange peel.

Edited by eje, 20 February 2007 - 03:10 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#67 cocktailgeek

cocktailgeek
  • participating member
  • 50 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 20 February 2007 - 03:26 PM

Unfortunately, I don't know.  I'm not even sure if this is an older classic cocktail or a newer "classic" invention.  I have also had the drink at the San Francisco restaurant, Range, but as I understand it, one of the Range bartenders is working at Bourbon and Branch so it may have been a local "transfer". 

View Post

I think it's a Thomas Waugh original that he first made at Range. I believe he may sometimes work at Bourbon and Branch; but, they have a number of new cocktails created by local and international bartenders on their menu.

View Post


Thomas has never worked at B&B, but you're on the right track. Dominic Venegas works at both B&B and Range as well as John Walker & Co. (one of the best liquor stores in the city). I believe the 1794 is his creation. I'll ask around, and will post a retraction if I'm wrong...
Marcovaldo Dionysos
Cocktail Geek
cocktailgeek@yahoo.com

#68 cocktailgeek

cocktailgeek
  • participating member
  • 50 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 21 February 2007 - 03:35 AM

Unfortunately, I don't know.  I'm not even sure if this is an older classic cocktail or a newer "classic" invention.  I have also had the drink at the San Francisco restaurant, Range, but as I understand it, one of the Range bartenders is working at Bourbon and Branch so it may have been a local "transfer". 

View Post

I think it's a Thomas Waugh original that he first made at Range. I believe he may sometimes work at Bourbon and Branch; but, they have a number of new cocktails created by local and international bartenders on their menu.

View Post


Thomas has never worked at B&B, but you're on the right track. Dominic Venegas works at both B&B and Range as well as John Walker & Co. (one of the best liquor stores in the city). I believe the 1794 is his creation. I'll ask around, and will post a retraction if I'm wrong...

View Post


I was @ b&B tonight, and I stand by my previous post. Dominic was surprised to see orange bitters in the recipe, but endorsed a ratio of 2:1:1.
Marcovaldo Dionysos
Cocktail Geek
cocktailgeek@yahoo.com

#69 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 21 February 2007 - 09:00 AM

I was @ b&B tonight, and I stand by my previous post.  Dominic was surprised to see orange bitters in the recipe, but endorsed a ratio of 2:1:1.

View Post

Thanks for checking into this Marco!

It's a very tasty cocktail.

Coincidentally, the Dr. Cocktail column in the March/April Imbibe Magazine has a recipe for the "Boulevardier" from McElhone's 1927 book, "Barflies and Cocktails". 1 1/2 oz Bourbon, 1 oz Campari, 1 oz Italian Vermouth.

Great minds think alike, eh? Rye sounds better to me, anyway!

edit - Also, according to Dr. Cocktail, this Campari and whiskey drink actually pre-dates any known reference to the Negroni by some 20 years.

Edited by eje, 21 February 2007 - 10:04 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#70 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 21 February 2007 - 09:30 AM

I was @ b&B tonight, and I stand by my previous post.  Dominic was surprised to see orange bitters in the recipe, but endorsed a ratio of 2:1:1.

View Post

Thanks for checking into this Marco!

It's a very tasty cocktail.
...

View Post

Yes, thank you very much! Sorry to have mistakenly added the orange bitters. :smile: Looking back at my scribbled notes, I think I mistakenly took my note for the flamed orange peel garnish as one for orange bitters. I'll go back and edit my post.
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#71 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 21 February 2007 - 10:55 AM

After a great dinner at Canteen, we couldn't resist going back to Bourbon and Branch. We thought it would be fun to check out what the Library looked like and wanted to try more of their creations. The Library also has an interesting decor and was pretty hopping at about 9:30 or so. There are a few seats at the bar; we found one seat at the end and camped out there for a bit. Although it makes sense given the larger ratio of patrons to bartenders in the Library, we hadn't realized that the Library serves a reduced menu. We still "managed" to find two excellent cocktails to sample.

Cucumber Gimlet: cucumber-infused gin (don't know the gin), elderflower syrup, orange bitters, champagne, garnish of very thin cucumber slices floating on top

Negroni Plymouth gin, Vya red vermouth, Campari

The cucumber gimlet was great. I've become a big fan of cucumber in cocktails (everything from a Hendrick's martini garnished with cucumber to a Trader Vic's Suffering Bastard with cucumber and mint garnish). This drink was a tasty and unique addition to the genre. As with the Tanq 10, the sweetness contributed by the elderflower syrup was well balanced with the non-sweet components of the drink so that the effect from the first to the last sip was not at all cloying.

We decided to order the Negroni because we like them a lot and also because my friend has experimented in making them at home with different gins and vermouths, etc. (One of his favorite mixes is Plymouth gin, Campari and Punt e Mes) In any case, the B&B version received his full approval and I enjoyed it very much as well.

We were interested in tasting a few other drinks we had noticed on the full menu and luckily were able to get another seat at the main bar.

Algonquin rye whiskey (not sure what type), pineapple juice and dry vermouth
Aviation 209 Gin, Luxardo maraschino, lemon

I haven't tinkered with Aviations at home and so far I had only had some uninspired renditions in a couple other bars around town so we were eager to try B8B's version. I knew that there had to be *something* to this drink given the enthusiasm it has engendered in so many. We loved B&B's offering, it was complex and well-balanced. I suspect the choice of gin and the ratio of ingredients are particularly important in making this drink. (No news to anyone here, I'm sure, but this Aviation was so much better than the other ones I've had.)

We were intrigued to try the Algonquin because it is a classic drink and we were just interested in how the ingredients would come together. I don't think I've had any other whiskey drink with either dry vermouth or pineapple juice. This is the one drink that I can't remember as well--it may be that my palate was getting tired or just that the combination was different enough that I need to try it again. The drink was definately on the less sweet side; with the pineapple providing just a hint of fruitiness.

Well, I'm looking forward to going back there again. The drinks are great as is the atmosphere for enjoying them. I love being able to have a complex tasting cocktail and a good conversation at the same time. One interesting thing that we experienced particularly well here was to notice the evolving taste of the drinks over time. It was akin to the experience of drinking a glass of wine and noticing the changng taste as it 'opens up' through warming and exposure to oxygen. I'm sure this experience was due mainly to the quality and complexity of the drinks, but I think the atmosphere was also important in being able to focus on the taste.

We thought the service was warmly professional at the bar and front of house. We ran into Dahl Donnellly, a proprieter of Bourbon and Branch in addition to Swig and Anu, at Swig afterwards. He introduced himself and we had a nice conversation about our experience at Bourbon and Branch. (No more drinks at Swig, we were just checking it out! :smile: )

Edited by ludja, 21 February 2007 - 11:18 AM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#72 Carolyn Tillie

Carolyn Tillie
  • participating member
  • 4,642 posts
  • Location:San Francisco and Napa

Posted 21 February 2007 - 11:30 AM

Ludja, I'm curious -- did you have to make reservations for both nights or was going back last night just a spur-of-the-moment decision?

I have yet to go but this is really high on my list...

#73 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 21 February 2007 - 12:07 PM

Ludja, I'm curious -- did you have to make reservations for both nights or was going back last night just a spur-of-the-moment decision?

I have yet to go but this is really high on my list...

View Post

Well, this was all on one night although our drinks were spread out quite a bit.... :wub: We had reservations for our first visit of the evening. After dinner we went back and checked out the Library which does not require reservations. After the Library we lucked in to being able to make a second visit to the bar as they happened to have some openings at that time.

If you want to go there spur of the moment, without reservations, the Library is a nice option. I think it typically gets more crowded as the evening wears on. It's very pretty, and would be great for a drink or two.

edited to add: Also note eje's post above re: the Library hours (Wes-Sat, 6 pm- 2 am)

Edited by ludja, 21 February 2007 - 12:31 PM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#74 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 09 March 2007 - 10:02 AM

My wife and I have been meaning to try NOPA for a while. We were in the neighborhood for a concert last night, so we thought we'd give walking in a try.

I've heard good things about the bar, so I was pretty excited.

I have to say the cocktails and bartenders exceeded my expectations.

We had a good vantage point to see most of the tables in the restaurant, and hardly a one didn't have a cocktail of some sort. They are selling the heck out of Old Cubans and Dark and Stormys. Not a single vodka drink on the menu.

The featured spirit was Aviation Gin, so I had a "The Forbidden". Aviation Gin, Gewürztraminer juice, dash of Mezcal, garnished with a wedge of preserved lemon. Lightly sweet and refreshing, with the floral nature of the gin and grape juice combining nicely.

If you're in the neighborhood, I'd definitely recommend stopping by for a drink. They're open late (1:00 AM), so no excuses.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#75 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 24 April 2007 - 12:52 PM

Orbit Room update:

I've been told that Flighty Hostess, Alberta Straub, is no longer at the Orbit Room.

There was another good bartender there (Ron, I believe); but, if you're making a special trip to visit Alberta, you will be disappointed.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#76 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,902 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 27 April 2007 - 06:19 PM

Any idea where Alberta has gone, Erik? I hope she's found a home behind another bar somewhere in the city. (Yeah, she's quirky, but she's way too good to lose.)

#77 cramper

cramper
  • participating member
  • 14 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:21 PM

Any idea where Alberta has gone, Erik? I hope she's found a home behind another bar somewhere in the city. (Yeah, she's quirky, but she's way too good to lose.)

View Post


I believe Alberta is concentrating on her new online show these days. A launch for teh channel happens in a couple of weeks, but you can find and subscribe to the video podcast on iTunes.
Camper English, Alcademics.com

#78 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 03 May 2007 - 09:17 AM

Speaking of San Francisco bar news, I recently learned from Marcia Gagliardi's great Tablehopper newsletter, that Enrico's Sidewalk Cafe is in the process of being resurrected and aiming for a June re-opening.

According to Tablehopper, Reza Esmali has been brought on as a consultant GM and is overseeing staffing, the bar program, and cocktail menu.

Here's hoping the new owners can re-vive and revitalize a true San Francisco classic.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#79 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 18 May 2007 - 10:19 AM

Bar crawl celebrates local mixologists, Amanda Berne

SF Chronicle article about the first annual (I hope!) San Francisco Cocktail Week.

With that, we boarded the bus for "Camp Drink-a-Lot" with our cocktail counselors in tow, wielding the microphone and a bottle, or two, of Tequila. They all took turns talking to the rapt crowd about Cocktail Week. May 13 was National Cocktail Day, but the San Francisco bartenders banded together to stretch out the one-day celebration through May 21, when Chronicle contributor Gary Regan will be bartending at a benefit at Absinthe.


---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#80 mbrowley

mbrowley
  • participating member
  • 78 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 11:21 AM

I'm heading to San Francisco for the first time the first week of August for some eating, drinking, and talks with a few distillers and need a few pointers.

California watering holes are still largely terra incognito for me (I know New Orleans, Amsterdam, and Tijuana, in fact, better than my newly adopted state). Given only five days in and around the city, what are the bars/bartenders I shouldn't miss?

Anyone, for instance, experimenting with ho-made bitters? Are there bars known for extensive selections of whiskey or gin? Is there a local favorite that just begs for sampling? How about fantastic liquor stores?

The questions are a little scattershot, but I'm still in the early stages of planning and don't know nearly enough about getting enhooched in Northern California.

Thanks,

~ Matt
Matthew B. Rowley
Rowley's Whiskey Forge, a blog of drinks, food, and the making thereof

Author of Moonshine! (ISBN: 1579906486)

#81 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 July 2007 - 02:44 PM

My understanding is the cool new place to be is Duggan McDonnel's Cantina.

But, the nice part is Cantina, Bourbon and Branch, and Rye, is that they are all within stumbling distance of one and other.

Still enjoy Alembic, though I haven't been by since they got a new Chef.

I believe Range is still recommendable for both food and drink.

NOPA and Slanted Door both recently impressed me with their bar programs, though I am ambivalent about the food at both restaurants.

Absinthe Bar & Brasserie still makes a good cocktail.

Old School, I'd say Tadich Grill, Bix, Pied Piper Bar at the Palace Hotel. Harry Denton's Starlight Room, maybe, though I haven't been there.

Oh, and I just read in Marcia Gagliardi's tablehopper about a new bar will be opening in the Drake Hotel:

~BAR DRAKE~ is a new glam lobby bar opening July 12 in the historic Sir Francis Drake Hotel—it will have a 1920s vibe and classic cocktail list crafted by fab mixologist Jacques Bezuidenhout. Jacques’s drinks menu will include some updates on classics like the Sazerac (j’adore) and the Manhattan (I love you too), plus some signatures like the Bar Drake Manhattan with Woodford Reserve Bourbon, port, Angostura bitters, and maple syrup, and the Tommy Gun, made with Tullamore Dew Irish Whisky, Grand Marnier, and shaken with apricot jam, lemon juice, and fresh ginger. There will also be some bar bites available, like goat cheese and chive profiteroles, and salumi and fennel pickles.


This post is getting long, so drop me a note if you want liquor store recommendations, and I'll fill you in on what to get where.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#82 cramper

cramper
  • participating member
  • 14 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 12 July 2007 - 09:58 AM

Matt- as far as homemade bitters go, you're in a great place. I wrote this article about a bitters-making event that brought a lot of bartenders together. So now you can find them at Absinthe, Bourbon & Branch, Rye, Cantina, and the Slanted Door for sure, and probably at the other venues mentioned in the article as well.
Camper English, Alcademics.com

#83 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,902 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 12 July 2007 - 07:11 PM

If you like tequila, don't miss Tres Agaves.

#84 BTR

BTR
  • participating member
  • 96 posts
  • Location:Santa Barbara

Posted 15 July 2007 - 10:20 AM

Elixir, in the Mission, looks promising, though I haven't been yet. They seem to have a well-put-together cocktail list.

Is the Orbit Room no longer a must-visit?

#85 andrewB

andrewB
  • participating member
  • 172 posts

Posted 15 July 2007 - 10:31 AM

does anyone know if the tiki room is still open? it was in the basement of an old hotel in nob hill..

#86 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 15 July 2007 - 12:03 PM

Dunno about the tiki room.

The only Tiki places I know of in San Francisco proper are Trad'r Sam's, Tonga Room, The Bamboo Hut, and Trader Vic's. Lingba Lounge in Potrero also might count.

Martini Monkey at the San Jose Airport is reputed to be good.

My personal favorite in the vicinity is Forbidden Island in Alameda.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#87 andrewB

andrewB
  • participating member
  • 172 posts

Posted 17 July 2007 - 02:26 AM

Dunno about the tiki room.

The only Tiki places I know of in San Francisco proper are Trad'r Sam's, Tonga Room, The Bamboo Hut, and Trader Vic's.  Lingba Lounge in Potrero also might count.

Martini Monkey at the San Jose Airport is reputed to be good. 

My personal favorite in the vicinity is Forbidden Island in Alameda.

View Post


sweet! i'm movin back to the bay and for some reason i have this itch for a tiki bar. funny thing about them is that there has been a recent surge in popularity for them in Europe. We went to one in London which was across the street from the Ritz and it paled in comparison to what i remember in SF...

#88 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 27 July 2007 - 01:24 PM

The word is, Enrico's has reopened. I haven't been, yet, so can't say what changes the new management and remodel might hold. Looking forward to getting down to North Beach to check it out.

Some fascinating news from this week's tablehopper:

As ~ABSINTHE BRASSERIE & BAR~ approaches its tenth anniversary (no easy feat in this town), some changes continue. Not only is new executive chef Jamie Lauren up and rocking her new menu, but GM Jeff Hollinger and bar manager Jonny Raglin are going to be opening up a new bar with Absinthe’s owner, Bill Russell-Shapiro. (Hollinger and Raglin have been talking with Russell-Shapiro about the idea for the past year or so.) The bar will be more of an affiliation than an extension of Absinthe; it will be a different vibe and concept, but still a place that will celebrate classic cocktails and feature new ones inspired by the classics. (For more on the classics and their offspring, have you ever have a chance to peek at the fab book, The Art of the Bar, written by Hollinger and Rob Schwartz? There’s a reason why it won “Best New Cocktail/Bartending Book” at Tales this year!) The new bar concept is being described as a grand saloon of the pre-Prohibition era, a grand time for cocktails, but since a space hasn’t been locked in yet, there will still be some fine-tuning of the idea and execution (it will also have a name, obviously). Expect a focus primarily on gin and whiskey.


---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#89 ricain

ricain
  • participating member
  • 32 posts
  • Location:Shaker Heights, OH

Posted 01 September 2007 - 03:30 PM

I stopped by Frisson the other night and had a fantastic Manhattan:

1.5 oz bourbon (bulleit I believe)
Dash Cynar
Dash orange bitters
Dash pomegranate molasses
Orange peel

It added a sweetness to the typical bitter kick.

It was fantastic - recommend you have Ben mix it on Tuesdays.

#90 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,569 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 01 September 2007 - 04:16 PM

I stopped by Frisson the other night and had a fantastic Manhattan:

1.5 oz bourbon (bulleit I believe)
Dash Cynar
Dash orange bitters
Dash pomegranate molasses
Orange peel

It added a sweetness to the typical bitter kick.

It was fantastic - recommend you have Ben mix it on Tuesdays.

View Post


My only question is whether or not this is a Manhattan? It might be called a Manhattan, but...
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?