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Eggs, Beaten, w/ Stuff Inside -Cook-Off 19

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#61 Abra

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Posted 18 February 2006 - 10:32 AM

Jack, I'm another in the camp of "never thought to make souffle without bechamel" so that recipe is a revelation to me. I'll be making it soon - thanks so much!

#62 I_call_the_duck

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Posted 18 February 2006 - 08:18 PM

Breakfast this morning, courtesy of Mr. Duck. Eggs scrambled with sour cream and green onions. Served on top of leftover naan from last night's (restaurant) dinner.
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#63 fou de Bassan

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 03:40 AM

Would egg nets qualify? Yes, the eggs are beaten but then made into nets and wrapped around a filling. So the stuff in them isn't an inclusion but a separate part.
Thanks
If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

#64 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 06:01 AM

Would egg nets qualify?  

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Just read this on egg nets about which I knew nothing:article on eGullet by Matthew Amster-Burton

Desperate Measures: Thai Omelet
Too many chickens, not enough cows

One of the most elegant motifs in Thai cooking is the use of egg nets. If you've ever seen a pastry chef make designs with melted chocolate onto wax paper, then chill and peel the chocolate off, you understand the principle behind egg nets. The eggs are beaten gently and then strained, leaving a smooth liquid. A thin web of egg strands is dripped from the tips of five fingers into a hot pan, then peeled off and used to wrap savory ingredients like pork, shrimp, and shallots. It's not the sort of skill you master in a weekend, but with the right partner it would make for a sexy Tampopo-style cooking scene.


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#65 Chris Amirault

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 06:26 AM

Would egg nets qualify?  Yes, the eggs are beaten but then made into nets and wrapped around a filling.  So the stuff in them isn't an inclusion but a separate part. 
Thanks

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I think that they are still eggs, beaten, with stuff in them -- so, sure!
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#66 Chufi

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 11:48 AM

I made a really nice tortilla today (did we discuss terminolgy already? to me a thick omelet with stuff in it is a tortilla, a thin one, a frittata). It had potatoes (little cubes, fried in olive oil until golden brown before adding to the egg mixture), smoked bacon (also fried first,), onions and garlic, sweated in olive oil first. And lots of fresh parsley, and a sprinkling of grated gouda.

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#67 Pan

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 03:37 PM

I made a really nice tortilla today (did we discuss terminolgy already? to me a thick omelet with stuff in it is a tortilla, a thin one, a frittata).[...]

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I thought that was just a linguistic difference between Castellano and Italian. But of course the most important thing is the taste.

#68 TongoRad

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 06:03 PM

Well- here's one that I'm calling a frittata. I only had 8 eggs to spare or it would have been thicker.

I had to wait until all of that snow from last week's storm melted away and gave me access to my sage plant, somehow this one just needed to have it. It's a Spaghetti Frittata, but in addition there are onions, the sage, roasted peppers and hunks of mozzarella.
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And here is a serving plated- some capers on top and some tomato/vegetable sauce from a braised chicken dish that I had lying about, though tomato sauce works just as well. I thought about adding the asparagus as well , but I'm glad I did it on the side:
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Edited by TongoRad, 19 February 2006 - 06:04 PM.

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#69 purplewiz

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 07:54 PM

The dark path to my first Spam souffle was the result of not feeling like cooking combined with a somewhat twisted sense of humor. Surprisingly, that one turned out well, but I'd wanted to tweak a few things. This cook-off was the perfect excuse to do so and to document the process.

The problems before were that the Spam cubes were too large, they all sank to the bottom, and the souffle needed a flavor boost. So this time I diced the Spam much smaller, and added some more seasonings.

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Basic mise en place. I figure Kraft cheese is the perfect accompaniment to Spam - Velveeta might have been better, but I didn't have any.

Not pictured are a dash of cayenne pepper, half a tsp of dry mustard, and the milk.

I should mention that one of the eggs pictured above had to be replaced with a stunt double because I broke the yolk while separating them. The injured egg will be held for observation overnight, and is expected to have a successful future career as breakfast.

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Mmmmmm. Spammy goodness.

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Half the can of Spam, diced, being browned off. (The other half was cut into larger cubes and shoved in the freezer for some future use.) I've found that browning off the Spam adds a lot of flavor and a nice texture.

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Bechamel with cheese. 3 tbsp flour, 3 tbsp butter, 1 cup milk, 1 handful shredded cheese (it's about a cup, more or less). Seasoned with a dash of cayenne, half a tsp of powdered mustard, salt, and a dash of ground pepper.

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Egg yolks were beaten with the homegrown dried chives (which is why they are not of uniform size), tempered in. I didn't take pictures of the tempering because I thought it was in the best interests of dinner to temper well rather than document it.

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Egg whites before....

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...and after. Stiff peaks, still glossy.

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Cheese egg mixture, Spam cubes, and green onions folded into the egg whites, then poured in the 1.5 quart souffle dish. A circular dent drawn in the top for that top hat effect - at least that's what the cookbook claims, and I figure it's not a lot of extra work.

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Forty minutes later. Started it at 350F, turned it down to about 300F for the last 10 minutes because it was getting awfully brown. Yes, of course I peek at my souffles while they're cooking!

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Dinner is served. Alongside is a wilted spinach salad with bacon and shallots.

All in all, a most satisfactory souffle. The Spam stayed nicely distributed throughout, the flavor was markedly better (my dining companion, otherwise known as my husband, asked what I did differently because this souffle had so much more flavor), and it has the added benefit of horrifying several of my foodie friends (a SPAM souffle?!?!).

Marcia.
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#70 christine007

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 08:23 PM

I love the Spam souffle, it's adorable!
I was looking at my old cookbooks, and I'm thinking about making a strata. Remember them?
It's basic- stale bread in a buttered dish, shredded cheese, finely chopped onion and tomato, and four eggs beat with a cup of millk poured over.
Baked in a 325 degree oven till brown on top and set. I have one recipe that calls for a can of stewed tomatos with the liquid drained off.
Does anyone still make these? It's been awhile since I cooked one, but I remember it was very good!
---------------------------------------

#71 tejon

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 08:29 PM

Stratas are lovely things when done right! They come out of the oven puffed and golden, with a rich, creamy interior. Even better with some form of pork in the mix :wink:
Kathy

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#72 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 08:33 PM

Marcia, that souffle is simply gorgeous! It makes me want to run downstairs to my kitchen and whisk one up ... but then everyone would wake up, demanding some of it!
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#73 christine007

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 08:40 PM

tejon, I agree! I was thinking about making a strata that we could share with my mom who is vegetarian.
To make up for the lack of meat, I might add some sauteed mushrooms and switch the cheese from cheddar to swiss. Tomatos being nasty this time of year, I am going for the canned, drained stewed tomatos.
That should be good, no?
---------------------------------------

#74 Fat Guy

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 09:31 PM

So I'm working on a version of shakshouka. This is a dish you find in various forms (and spelled various ways) around the Mideast and North Africa. The one I'm talking about involves a base of very slowly scrambled eggs with diced tomatoes. A small subset of people who cook shakshouka use this trick: at the very end of cooking, you crack some whole eggs over the mixture and the gooey stuff permeates the soft scrambled eggs.

My preliminary results were neither photo-worthy nor particularly good. But I'm now receiving some instruction from my friend Sigal Seeber, who used to be Geoffrey Zakarian's pastry chef at "44" (and is also the author of Light Quick Breads) and learned how to make shakshouka from him. I've had the dish at her house and loved it. If I can ever figure out how to make a version that doesn't suck, I'll post some photos and comments.

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#75 C. sapidus

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 09:05 AM

This thread inspired me to make some standard breakfast fare. In our house, DW usually makes the “regular” food, while I usually make the more exotic dishes. Apparently, somewhere along the line I mentally reversed the directions for making omelets and scrambled eggs. I had been cooking scrambled eggs quickly over high heat, and cooking omelets slowly over low heat. I can hear all of you thinking “Duh”.

Anyway, it turns out that the correct method works much better (all together, “Duh”). I made nice, soft, plain scrambled eggs for grandma and younger son. Then, I tried two batches of omelets. One had feta cheese with sautéed Poblano peppers, garlic, and chives. The other had Poblano peppers, garlic, and fresh basil. Can you tell that I love Poblano peppers?

I followed Julia Child’s instructions for banging on the skillet handle to flip the omelet. Although clouting cookware is great fun, I need to gauge impact strength better. One of the omelets flipped quite nicely, but the other half-cleared the pan. Even the flying omelet was quite tasty, though.

#76 Jensen

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 09:53 AM

I was looking at my old cookbooks, and I'm thinking about making a strata. Remember them?

[...]

Does anyone still make these? It's been awhile since I cooked one, but I remember it was very good!

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I've made a spinach and cheese strata within the last year or two; recipe from Epicurious.

#77 Osnav

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 11:30 AM

Chris, is it okay if the stuff in the scrambled eggs is eggs? I've recently noticed a few dishes in different books -- most recently Jose Andres's tapas book, and also in some books of Mideastern recipes -- that are variants on this theme: you cook some scrambled eggs and then towards the end of cooking you crack some whole eggs over them. This creates not only a dramatic presentation but also you get the curdy scrambled eggs and the gooey texture of a fried/poached/soft-boiled egg at the same time as the yolks run all over the scrambled eggs.

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God this sounds good. I don't care if this qualifies or not. I'm heading for the kitchen NOW!
"the only thing we knew for sure about henry porter was that his name wasn't henry porter" : bob

#78 mizducky

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 01:43 PM

Okay, there's nothing particularly special about this omelette, except that I thought it came out purty ...

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... and it's made with egg substitutes.

Other than the flavor being a tad flat, they're pretty decent. And they behaved very well in the cooking process.

(I don't even try flipping my omelettes. I simply fold it in the pan, and slide it out onto the serving plate.)

ETA: oh yeah, the green stuff is sauteed scallions.

Edited by mizducky, 20 February 2006 - 02:35 PM.


#79 laurenkusa

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 02:33 PM

Howdy,

I realized that I fit into this thread as I recently made a "leftovers" frittata.

I took a basic frittata recipe from Bittman's How to cook everything and just substituted my leftover pasta, sauteed mushrooms, bell pepper, onion, garlic mixture, cheese, and of course 6 eggs. I cooked it on the stove for a few minutes then transferred it into the oven to cook for another 20 minutes or so.

Came out great, brown on the bottom, fluffy in the middle. I used a 12 inch stainless steel calphalon pan.
Lauren

#80 craft-G

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 04:02 PM

We just did an egg dish at the restaurant for an amuse.
Bacon and Eggs w/ Hollandaise

Egg whites that have been whipped to stiff peaks. Fold in extremely fine chopped bacon and bake
ile flotant style. When the meringues are done then carefully with a squeeze bottle, inject the meringues with hollandaise and serve fast.

In the end it resembled a poached egg and when you cut into it the yolk (hollandaise) oozes out.
Fun and easy dish.

#81 fou de Bassan

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 02:50 AM

egg nets...
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They aren't pretty. I've been cooking from David Thompson's awesome Thai food, but I can't seem to achieve the elegant results he does. They taste delicious anyway.
If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

#82 bleudauvergne

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 03:21 AM

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I decided on this family homespun souffle from Mme Saint Ange - the potato souffle. I'm seeing how little money I can spend on food and still make it taste good. :biggrin: I scaled the recipe down to one serving and it only cost 45 centimes to make. I also took awful and strange photo of it and I apologize in advance for it. I am stuck in a terrible hokey photography spiral. Help! :wacko:
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#83 bleudauvergne

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 03:28 AM

Put in the oven for 25 mins.
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Jack, I saw in Mme Saint Ange's technique for the souffle that she says to put it on the floor of the oven, and you have done this too. Can you explain why?

#84 Shalmanese

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 07:19 AM

Jack, I saw in Mme Saint Ange's technique for the souffle that she says to put it on the floor of the oven, and you have done this too.  Can you explain why?

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You want the heat to rise from the bottom to give more lift to the souffle.
PS: I am a guy.

#85 jackal10

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 07:29 AM

Amen Shalamanese!
The bottom of my Aga oven is hot.
Thats is why I recommend putting it on a pre-heated pizza stone.

Herve This, in an article on Souffle in his Molecular Gastronomy book, just released in English, says you should beat the egg whites to a stiff, dry foam, and suggests briefly grilling the top to seal it to give an even rise.

Edited by jackal10, 21 February 2006 - 07:33 AM.


#86 bleudauvergne

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 09:05 AM

While Madame St. Ange reccomends painting the top with melted butter before going in the oven, which I suppose might not give the desired effect. Thanks for those tips!

#87 torakris

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Posted 23 February 2006 - 11:18 PM

I should have taken more than one picture, many apologies for my lack of photographic talent....

This is tamago-toji.
Basically anything you feel like is simmered in a gently seasoned broth (dashi, soy sauce and mirin) then a couple beaten eggs are added and it is cooked until just set.
This is the same way a dish like oyako-don (Japanese chicken and egg topped rice dish) is cooked.
Last night I used satsumage, a fish paste product, with gobo (burdock root) and mitsuba (trefoil). The mitsuba was added after the eggs.

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#88 DianaBuja

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 03:45 AM

So I'm working on a version of shakshouka. This is a dish you find in various forms (and spelled various ways) around the Mideast and North Africa. The one I'm talking about involves a base of very slowly scrambled eggs with diced tomatoes. A small subset of people who cook shakshouka use this trick: at the very end of cooking, you crack some whole eggs over the mixture and the gooey stuff permeates the soft scrambled eggs.

My preliminary results were neither photo-worthy nor particularly good. But I'm now receiving some instruction from my friend Sigal Seeber, who used to be Geoffrey Zakarian's pastry chef at "44" (and is also the author of Light Quick Breads) and learned how to make shakshouka from him. I've had the dish at her house and loved it. If I can ever figure out how to make a version that doesn't suck, I'll post some photos and comments.

View Post


Best [commercial] shakshuka I've had - was at the Filfila restaurant in central Cairo. The dish is not really made in rural Egypt, where plain boiled eggs that are dipped in fresh cumin [not salt] are a common b'fast dish, with white cheese, onions, bread and tomatoes.

Last year an Israeli friend told me that 'shakshuka' originated as a jewish [I believe sephardic] dish, thence spreading to North Africa and etc.... or, perhaps, from North Africa and then taken to Israel... Certainly, the word 'شاكشكا' is not derived from a common arabic root.

Any thoughts on this?

I make shakshuka with onion, tomatoes, green pepper, some hot pepper - sometimes, also, a few cubes of eggplant and white cheese ['gibna bayda'].
Simmering the veggies, then breaking the eggs either on them - or keeping the eggs whole and breaking them into indentations in the veggie mixture.

Look forward to your experiments and pix!

Dianabuja.

#89 Lori in PA

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 04:26 AM

Well, in the middle of a cooking frenzy yesterday here at my house, I managed to flip a full dozen eggs out of the too-full fridge and upside down onto the floor. It was one of those suspended animation moments for me -- stupefied expression, dismayed gasp, and all. The carton landed squarely, so the result was not the slimy mess I expected when I picked up the carton; rather, every egg but one was extensively crackled across the top.

I'd like to say I dropped everything and made a lovely, bechamel-free souffle, but twouldn't be true. I knew I was making four shoofly pies for a funeral this morning, so I cracked four eggs into one bowl and put the other eight into another. The eight got whipped up with salt and pepper this morning for a couple of eggs worth of scrambled for dh before he left for work. The rest of us will polish them off shortly for our own breakfast, I guess. I WANT to make a souffle, but I seem to be blocked. I went so far as to get out my one and only Julia Child cookbook, but saw the directions for an eight-cup souffle dish and thought, "Does my (one and only) souffle dish hold eight cups? It seems smaller than that...", plus, that whole foil collar thing seemed to be just too much work in the middle of all my other cooking enterprises. Somebody tell me I don't need to bother with that...
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#90 jackal10

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 04:45 AM

You need not bother with a collar!

Souffles are real easy...and no more work than making those scrambled eggs

seperate the yolks and the whites.
Flavour the yolks - booze, chocolate, cheese, veg or fruit puree or what you will.
Beat the whites as hard as you can.
Use ramekins or a straight sided bowl that the egg mixture will fill
Preheat the oven (preferably with a pixxa stone or heavy baking sheet)
Butter the dish
Mix the beaten whites and the yolk mixture, pour into the bowl. Out into oven. Wait 20 mins. Serve at once

Nobody has yet made a tortilla de patata...





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