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Eggs, Beaten, w/ Stuff Inside -Cook-Off 19

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154 replies to this topic

#31 eJulia

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 11:55 AM

Fat Guy: I don't know how Chris will rule, but I'd love to see some picks of that!!!
"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”
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#32 Abra

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 01:01 PM

Me too, FG - more details and visuals on the Egg-On-Egg dish, please!

#33 Chris Amirault

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 01:12 PM

I decree, with relish, that Steven is allowed to have the "stuff" added to the beaten eggs be eggs. Allez cuisine!
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#34 torakris

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 04:29 PM

These eggs sort of have stuff in them, if stuff can be dashi, soy sauce and sugar...

Dashi-maki tamago AKA the sweetened egg omelette found in sushi bars

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close-up

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#35 Hiroyuki

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 04:43 PM

These eggs sort of have stuff in them, if stuff can be dashi, soy sauce and sugar...

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Do you call them stuff? :blink: :biggrin: I'm going to make my versions for lunch, with other stuff.

#36 torakris

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 04:59 PM

These eggs sort of have stuff in them, if stuff can be dashi, soy sauce and sugar...

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Do you call them stuff? :blink: :biggrin: I'm going to make my versions for lunch, with other stuff.

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I guess it depends on how we are defining "stuff" :biggrin:
I am planning something else for Saturday.....

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#37 OnigiriFB

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 05:01 PM

Finally a cook off I could do without running all over town!

I used to leftover mushrooms I had made last night with garlic, onion, and red wine and combined them with scrambled eggs. Sliced the leftover t-bone and some grapes made a wonderful brunch.

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Kristen - I LOVE those type of eggs. I even bought a tomago pan just to make rolled omelets! I tried using chopsticks to "flip" it but I sucked! Sad since I've used chopsticks all my life. Looks nummy!

#38 Hiroyuki

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 08:58 PM

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I made three different versions:
Left: Western style (3 eggs and milk) with processed cheese in it, with pizza sauce I previously made
Middle: Sweetened version (3 eggs and 2 tbsp kaeshi) with nori in it, with grated daikon and soy sauce
Right: Unsweetened version (3 eggs, soy sauce, and dashi powder) with fake crabmeat in it, with ume chirimen (a type of furikake with pickled plum)
I must say I wasn't impressed with any of them. I'm convinced that atsuyaki tamago should have nothing in it and should not be sweetened.
My regular atsuyaki tamago recipe can be found here on RecipeGullet.

#39 Jason Perlow

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 09:14 PM

Hiroyuki, I did not make this atsuyaki tamago, but ate some this evening at a local sushi place. I thought the presentation was very interesting:

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#40 Hiroyuki

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 09:25 PM

Hiroyuki, I did not make this atsuyaki tamago, but ate some this evening at a local sushi place. I thought the presentation was very interesting:

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Oh, yes, interesting presentation, but it's SWEETENED, I suppose. I don't know why Japanese people like to sweeten eggs...

#41 Idlewild

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 10:09 PM

Egg things are a standby around here. Tonight I made a large omelette with bacon, green onion, fresh tomato, a little salt and pepper, and a scrape of parmesan. Cut it into two wedges and we had it with toast. Perfect for a light dinner. The other day it was scrambled eggs, with this divine "mediterranean style" yoghurt - about as thick as clotted cream and deliciously sharp and tangy, and lots of butter. I had just a sprinkle of cheddar on top, the husband had cheddar and salsa because he does not respect my beautiful delicate scrambled eggs. Sigh. Also he asked me to cook them longer. Fine, but mine come out of the pan first. I fear tough scrambled eggs.

The thing I keep wanting to master and not doing because I'm chickenshit is flipping the omelette by hand in the pan - that much vaunted wrist action. I know I couldn't do it with a cast iron pan, I have weak wrists. I do have a small all-clad omelette pan but I'm still rather nervous since I've been doing omelettes the poke-with-spatula way since I was ten.

#42 Shalmanese

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 02:30 AM

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Pancetta, Asparagus, Mushroom & Truffle Quiche

I'm not happy with this shot. I made 3 quiches and they were all of differing heights so we decided to polish off the two smaller ones first and let the big one cool till tomorrow for easier slicing. The smallest one was in the pic and was slightly overcooked so you I didn't get that lovely tender custard. Plus, the lighting makes the mushrooms look awful. I'll take another pic tomorrow morning of the deep one.

Incidentally, this quiche was made with an Oil Crust since i'm too cowardly to make a proper pate brisee (not cowardly technique wise, I'm just afraid of so much saturated fat). The crust was a bit pale on the bottom and probably could have done with a blind baking before the ingredients went in. But the crust was tender and tasty and very easy to make.
PS: I am a guy.

#43 jackal10

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 04:09 AM

I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.
Any requests as to type/flavouring?
(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

Edited by jackal10, 17 February 2006 - 04:10 AM.


#44 Marlene

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 05:15 AM

I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.
Any requests as to type/flavouring?
(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

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Cheese or Grand Marnier!
Marlene
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#45 petite tête de chou

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 05:36 AM

I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.
Any requests as to type/flavouring?
(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

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A winter vegetable souffle would be interesting.
Shelley: Would you like some pie?
Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

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#46 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 07:02 AM

Incidentally, this quiche was made with an Oil Crust since i'm too cowardly to make a proper pate brisee (not cowardly technique wise, I'm just afraid of so much saturated fat). The crust was a bit pale on the bottom and probably could have done with a blind baking before the ingredients went in. But the crust was tender and tasty and very easy to make.

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Although I made a real pate brisee, not an oil crust, I would still say to blind bake it. It makes an amazing difference in the taste and texture of the crust. You want it nearly browned, not just set. Also, if you have two pie plates use one inside the other to keep the crust thin and crunchy. More room for custard. And, keep your fillings in check, also to have more room for custard. See Quiche thread.

#47 Jason Perlow

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 08:53 AM

I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.
Any requests as to type/flavouring?
(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

View Post


Chocolate. See, now you have to do all of them. We're pulling for you, Jack.
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#48 jackal10

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 09:09 AM

I'm sure there are people here who make better souffles, with flat tops...
However here is my rustic version. Very good it is too for a light lunch or supper.
Fantastically versatile recipe. You can use almost any filling or flavouring, sweet or savoury. Use the same mixture in a flat pan to make a roulade. Any souffle left cover can be left to deflate and go cold, then reheat in a sauce for a double cooked souffle.

Winter vegetable and cheese

Ingredients.
Left over veg Here sprouts and carrots
An egg per person
Grated cheese (this is cheddar and Parmesan)
Salt, pepper, butter


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Preheat the oven to 200C/400F. Souffles like bottom heat, so put in a baking stone if you have one.

Separate the eggs. Butter the ramekins well, and if you like put a "surprise" in them . Some ham or bacon would also go well if you eat them, or a cube of cheese, or for a sweet liquor souffle a cube of bread soaked in the liquor. Whiz the ingredients other than the egg white. Season well - all that flavour is going to be diluted by the egg foam.
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Beat the egg white to soft peaks. The puree and the egg white should be about the same stiffness, and roughly equal volume. Mix a little of the egg white into the puree to lighten it.
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Fold the rest of the egg white into the puree. Don't beat out all the air - its OK for some to be not fully mixed. Fill into the ramekins
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Tap to settle the mixture then run your finger round to clear the edge
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Put in the oven for 25 mins.
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Serve immediately. This deflated a bit while I was fiddling with the camera. Should be just runny in the centre.
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Enjoy!

You can use many different vegetable purees. Courgette is good in summer.
For a cheese souffle use a Bechamel (white) sauce
For sweet souffle add sugar, and coat the inside of the ramekin with sugar.
Fruit puree are good, or just a liquor, like Grand Marnier beaten with the egg yolk.
Chocolate is classic: melt the chocolate and beat with the egg yolks.

Edited by jackal10, 17 February 2006 - 09:36 AM.


#49 Jason Perlow

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 09:29 AM

Nice, Jack.
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#50 BryanZ

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 11:02 AM

Good demo. I like the in-the-oven shots.

#51 Lori in PA

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 11:22 AM

Thank you, Jack. I kept thinking, "Where's the bechamel? I thought you had to make a bechamel?" So that's only for cheese versions?
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#52 jackal10

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 04:59 PM

Thank you, Jack.  I kept thinking, "Where's the bechamel?  I thought you had to make a bechamel?"  So that's only for cheese versions?

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Old recipes for souffle used bechamel as the flavour carrier and to give body. More recent formulations are flourless to give more intense tastes.
You can leave out the bechamel for cheese versions, and just add the grated cheese to the egg yolk but the cheese can come out a bit grainy, or melt the cheese with some cream, but I rather like the softness a bechamel gives for cheese souffles.

#53 Marlene

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 05:11 PM

That was awesome Jack, thanks. I might even have the courage to try this on the weekend! Is there a particular size ramiken that works best for individual souffles?
Marlene
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#54 jackal10

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 05:17 PM

That was awesome Jack, thanks.  I might even have the courage to try this on the weekend!  Is there a particular size ramiken that works best for individual souffles?

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Those are 3 inch diameter internal

#55 petite tête de chou

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 06:17 PM

Jack, I was hoping that you would use brussel sprouts, I love them. Was their flavor quite noticeable in the souffle? Are meats ever used in souffles? Perhaps as the "surprise?"
Shelley: Would you like some pie?
Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

#56 KatieLoeb

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 06:43 PM

Ooooh, ooooooh! Can we please transfer the Rustic Souffle recipe to RecipeGullet so we'll all know where to find it in the future? Something that simple and lovely is definitely a keeper and I always forget which thread I saw a recipe in when I want it again. :sad:

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#57 rjwong

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 08:13 PM

That was awesome Jack, thanks.  I might even have the courage to try this on the weekend!  Is there a particular size ramiken that works best for individual souffles?

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Those are 3 inch diameter internal

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My ramekins are precisely that size. jackal10, you're encouraging me, just a bit ...
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#58 jackal10

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Posted 18 February 2006 - 03:22 AM

Yes, you can taste the Brussels sprouts. I guess you could accentuate the flavour by frying them a bit first.
Meat is indeed used - ham and cheese for example. Start with a mousseline force-meat and add the eggs. Escoffier gives recipes for many variations - ham, duck, chicken such as for a truffled chicken souffle, (whizz raw chicken breast with some cream, add a little truffle oil, before mixing with the eggs), and then you can play on that - add mushrooms or asparagus, for example.
Fish - smoked fish such as smoked haddock is well known for its affinity with eggs. Need strong flavours as they are diluted a lot by the egg.

Edited by jackal10, 18 February 2006 - 03:24 AM.


#59 petite tête de chou

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Posted 18 February 2006 - 04:19 AM

Thanks. I really like the fish suggestion. Since I have easy access to smoked salmon perhaps a "rustic" smoked salmon souffle is in my near future...with a pile of roasted sprouts on the side. :smile:
Shelley: Would you like some pie?
Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

#60 Lori in PA

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Posted 18 February 2006 - 05:30 AM

For a party I attended last night I made mini quiches with cream cheese pastry. The filling was smoked salmon, shallot, and roasted asparagus. I had extra filling left, so added egg and bits of cream cheese to it this morning and am reading this thread while eating my breakfast of scrambled eggs deluxe. (Isn't it nice when one can read a thread on a particular topic while eating the very type of food being described?)
~ Lori in PA
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