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Taboule


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74 replies to this topic

#61 scubadoo97

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 01:19 PM

My question is curly or flat leaf parsley? I've always used curly, just curious about everyone else.


My Grandmother always used curly but may have been based on availability. I've used both and don't have a big preference

#62 rotuts

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 01:27 PM

Ill have to look again at the Market, but I have not gotten curly in a long time as in the past it had no flavor what so ever.

 

plenty of " tickle " though.


Edited by rotuts, 28 March 2013 - 01:28 PM.


#63 crinoidgirl

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 01:53 PM


Why no mint?

I ask also. 
 
No mint in Tabbouleh is like no chocolate in chocolate cake. :shock:


The best (to MY taste, so your mileage may vary) tabbouleh I've ever had comes from a local Lebanese bakery. They don't use mint. They also use plenty of oil and lemon, which I like.
V

#64 janeer

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 08:47 PM

Lotsa mint, lotsa lemon, lotsa parsley (curly for this). I do use ripe summer tomato--just a little--and a little finely chopped sweet onion. I soak (boiling water) and drain/dry very well, sometimes overnight (mix with a little oil), then dress about 1/2 hr before serving, chill.



#65 Darienne

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 07:25 AM

I'm almost feeling overwhelmed by all these replies.  Let's see.  I'll make Tabbouleh today and divide it in half and put tomatoes in half.  Of course, living in the far frozen north as we do, the tomatoes will be cardboard and tasteless... :raz: .


Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#66 Jaymes

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 07:55 AM

 

Why no mint?

I ask also. 
 
No mint in Tabbouleh is like no chocolate in chocolate cake. :shock:

 

The best (to MY taste, so your mileage may vary) tabbouleh I've ever had comes from a local Lebanese bakery. They don't use mint. They also use plenty of oil and lemon, which I like.

 

At least in Lebanon, tomatoes are compulsory. Tabbouleh should not be bone dry, in fact it's often very moist with a small pool of dressing, which is usually not more than sumac, garlic, a lot of lemon, and olive oil. Also, in Lebanon, preserved lemons to my knowledge aren't really a thing.

 

Tabbouleh should properly be eaten like a lettuce wrap, it's always served with whole leaves of romaine.

 

And because, as most knowledgeable authorities agree, tabbouleh was invented in the Lebanese mountains, I think the Lebanonese know best when it comes to what to put into Tabbouleh.



#67 SobaAddict70

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 08:33 AM

I've made tabbouleh one of the usual ways -- with couscous, lots of parsley and mint, not as much tomato.

 

Then, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease.  It's not traditional though.



#68 Jaymes

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:07 PM

hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease.  It's not traditional though.

 

That sounds interesting.  Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted.  I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it.  Or a link...



#69 SobaAddict70

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:13 PM

hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease.  It's not traditional though.

 

That sounds interesting.  Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted.  I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it.  Or a link...

 

here you go, Jaymes:  http://kitchenseason...ticchie-part-1/



#70 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 03:10 PM

hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease.  It's not traditional though.

 

That sounds interesting.  Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted.  I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it.  Or a link...

 

You can also make it with cauliflower, by processing the cauliflower into small grains to replace the bulghur; you can steam or sautee it or leave it raw.



#71 Jaymes

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 04:20 PM

 

hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease.  It's not traditional though.

 

That sounds interesting.  Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted.  I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it.  Or a link...

 

You can also make it with cauliflower, by processing the cauliflower into small grains to replace the bulghur; you can steam or sautee it or leave it raw.

Hey, thanks, you two!

 

We eat a LOT of Med/Middle Eastern food in our family.  And having a gluten-free tabuli substitute will sure be helpful.


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#72 ChefCrash

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 01:55 AM

No mint. Finely chopped tomatoes. Flat leaf parsley if young and tender, otherwise, whatever:)



#73 cakewalk

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 02:06 PM

Because good tabbouleh is a beautiful thing:

 

http://chefindisguis...tion/#more-5527

 

One of the commenters mentions straining the tomatoes and then soaking the bulghur in the tomato water. Nice idea.


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#74 Jaymes

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:37 PM

Because good tabbouleh is a beautiful thing:

 

http://chefindisguis...tion/#more-5527

 

One of the commenters mentions straining the tomatoes and then soaking the bulghur in the tomato water. Nice idea.

 

Oh my goodness, what a great blog!  That tabbouleh/tabuli/whatever in the jar is absolutely gorgeous.  The next potluck I go to, I'm taking that.  And at serving time, will just pour it into a bowl and stir.

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to post this link.

 

Wonderful.



#75 cakewalk

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:07 PM

 

Because good tabbouleh is a beautiful thing:

 

http://chefindisguis...tion/#more-5527

 

One of the commenters mentions straining the tomatoes and then soaking the bulghur in the tomato water. Nice idea.

 

Oh my goodness, what a great blog!  That tabbouleh/tabuli/whatever in the jar is absolutely gorgeous.  The next potluck I go to, I'm taking that.  And at serving time, will just pour it into a bowl and stir.

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to post this link.

 

Wonderful.

 

Glad you like it. I came across the blog about a year ago, I don't even remember how. She offers a wonderful "intersection" of east and west for both cooking and baking.