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Congee

Chinese

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190 replies to this topic

#181 Ce'nedra

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 09:12 PM

What kind of sauce is that SobaAddict70? It looks like there's possibly some sesame oil too?
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#182 Dianabanana

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 05:53 PM

I suspect that what I'm about to ask is painfully basic for those knowledgeable in Chinese cooking, but here goes. I just made a fish congee, the recipe for which directed that the fish be marinated with salt, pepper, a dash of sesame oil and a pinch of cornstarch. What is the function of the cornstarch here?

#183 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 05:00 PM

Diana - in the chinese restaurants that I've been to in the Philippines, the fish is lightly deep fried so that it takes a slightly crispy coating. Then again, some just steam the fish.
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#184 Dianabanana

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 08:06 PM

I'm sorry, my question wasn't very clear. After the marination, the fish was just added to the congee, which is what confused me. I mean, the congee doesn't need to be thickened and it seemed that the cornstarch would have just rinsed off in the liquid so I can't see what it was doing for the fish. And such a very small amount, too. I have to say it was one of the most delicious things ever, even if I don't understand it!

#185 Dejah

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 08:41 AM

I'm sorry, my question wasn't very clear. After the marination, the fish was just added to the congee, which is what confused me. I mean, the congee doesn't need to be thickened and it seemed that the cornstarch would have just rinsed off in the liquid so I can't see what it was doing for the fish. And such a very small amount, too. I have to say it was one of the most delicious things ever, even if I don't understand it!

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Hi Diana,

The purpose is the same as "velveting" meat before stir-frying. The small amount of cornstarch gives the slices of fish a velvet texture as it is quickly cooked in the congee. It really makes a difference.

I usually add more than "a pinch." :smile:
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#186 Dianabanana

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 09:28 AM

Thank you for the explanation. I'll try adding more next time.

I have one more question. Is "jook" pronounced more like "book" or "juke"?

#187 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 09:36 AM

What kind of sauce is that SobaAddict70? It looks like there's possibly some sesame oil too?

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oh sorry, here I am seven months later replying to your question. :raz:

it's just mushroom soy sauce with a little sesame oil. toppings included broiled chicken breast, scallions and pickled ginger (ginger root, rice wine vinegar, salt).

#188 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 09:41 AM

this thread is timely since I've been craving it lately.

here's a pic from last month:

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the yellow stuff is 2 lightly beaten eggs.

#189 CFT

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 03:31 AM

I have one more question. Is "jook" pronounced more like "book" or "juke"?

Diana, try this link: http://humanum.arts....i...ch.php?q=
Best Wishes,
Chee Fai.

#190 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 08:06 AM

I have one more question. Is "jook" pronounced more like "book" or "juke"?

Diana, try this link: http://humanum.arts....i...ch.php?q=

#191 Jenni

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 09:54 AM

This is an old thread, but I will revive :)

For me, I usually make an Indian version of congee. But when I do make "Chinese style" I like to cook the rice with just a few ginger slices, for at least 3 hours so it's really creamy. Sometimes I add a little celery when there is only 1 hour left, depends how I feel. I serve it with greens that have been stir-fried with lots of garlic and chilli and seasoned with soy sauce and toasted sesame oil (use more of all the seasonings then you would usually - as people will only be adding a little to their congee). I also serve ginger slices, fresh coriander and spring onions, plus extra soy sauce. Yum...

But let me tell you about kanji in Kerala. This is not something you will get in a fancy restaurant, but if you stay at someones home you might be able to try it. When I stayed with some friends in Kerala for six weeks, we sometimes had it for breakfast or for a late supper. It's really easy to digest and so soothing for your stomach. Made with rosematta rice (so it had a very slight pinkish look), the rice is parboiled so it becomes very soft but does not turn to mush. It was always served with payar, which are whole moong beans cooked dry (e.g not a wet soupy dish) with a few seasonings such as onion, curry leaves, ginger, etc. For me, this is pure comfort food.

What about elsewhere in India? Well, travelling through Madhya Pradesh, I noticed "rice soup" on several hotel's menus. I thought to myself, this must be kanji, and so I often ordered it when I wanted something light and comforting to eat. Seasoned with ghee and sometimes a few cumin seeds, I liked to also add a little freshly ground black pepper.

I have heard that in the North East of India, rice gruels are made by cooking rice with lots of water and leaving overnight to ferment slightly, sometimes with a little yoghurt added. Now I have had kanji with yoghurt, but not fermented! And in Goa they have something called pez which is another congee dish.

In fact, the traditional Indian medicine system Ayurvda has a number of gruels and soups made from grains that are prescribed for invalids and those who need a light diet. Plus of course, there is the wet version of khichdi, which adds dal to make a nutritious one pot meal for someone under the weather, or in need of comforting, easy to digest food.

At home, I always made kanji very simply as a light breakfast or supper dish, usually made quite plain and eaten with a dry vegetable dish and/or condiments. Sometimes with yoghurt added too. Nowadays, I often make Kerala style kanji, because it's so good.

I have always thought of kanji and other rice gruels/porridges/soups as something that can only really be appreciated by someone who eats rice everyday, two or three times a day. As one of those kind of people, I have always enjoyed it! But I see now that Chinese style congees have brought this wonderful dish to a whole new audience of people. And I think that can only be a good thing!

Edited by Jenni, 14 March 2011 - 09:57 AM.






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