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A Diary Of A Life At CIA


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#1 chiantiglace

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 01:50 AM

Hi everyone, How have you been. Sorry I've been gone so long. I began attending the CIA 6 weeks ago. I just finished my first block which is basically the generic start off. I've had 5 classes and have really been busy every second of the day. There is so much to do, especially extra curricular, everytime I sat down to put this intro into place I get distracted by something new and exciting.

So here it is. First I want to give everyone a look through my eyes. I took a lot of pictures the day I arrived and it was in the middle of a snow storm, so here are a few.
This is a picture of "Roth Hall"
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Heres one of the "Conrad H. Hilton Library"
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Heres a picture of the St. Andrews cafe, It may be a little difficult to see.
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Heres a small view of the brand new "Anton Plaza". It is a garden and stone plaza that rests ontop of a nicely laid parking garage. I must say it is classy for a garage.
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Heres a picture of the new Italian "colavita" education center with the Ristorante Catherine de Medici.
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Here are a few specs from the inside, first being Farquharson. This is where we eat most of our meals. A lot of events are held here as well, like formals and bingo night.
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This second one is where two of my classes were recently held, gastronomy and product knowledge. It's the Annheuser Busch theatre.
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Class has been very interesting. There was about 100 students starting with me during orientation, which lasted the first two days. The students ran the gamut of size, shape, age, sex, race, place or origin, and skill level. I actually could not sit still for the first few days, there was just so much to see and so many people to meet. Overnight I went from very good with names, to quite poor.

On the third day we split up into 2 classes, both averageing about 48-50. AM class was from about 8 - 12 everyday while my class started at 2 and ended at 6 everyday. The AM class eats breakfast, and lunch on stage, served by the banquet class. PM eats lunch from kitchens and Dinner on stage from PM banquet class. We all have writing classes at various times, but those classes last a normal semester, like a normal college.

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday I have Math from 2-3:30 and Product Knowledge from 4 - 5:30
Tuesday and Thursday I have Gastronomy from 2 - 4 and Food Safety (Serv Safe) from 4:15 - 6:15

Math is pretty basic on food costs. The math itself is no calculus, its quite easy. To me the class seems more like a game, more like answering trick questions rather than doing actually math.

Product Knowledge is great. Anyone can learn a lot from that class and have a good time doing it. My professor J. Stein is a little wacked, but he knows his stuff. This guy is about as passionate about fruits and vegetables as I am pastry. Theres a lot of Identification as well as condition and quality explanation. The store room is immaculant. I love walking through it and just looking at all the different kinds of products all in one room.

Gastronomy is also a neat class. It's kind of hard to think back and remember what I learned because in all it feels some what irrelevant. But everytime I left class I felt smarter than when I went in, so I am sure I got way more out of it then I thought. There were a lot of corky things going on. We had several "surprise" tasting and smelling projects. Everytime I volunteered to help set up and assist just so I wouldn't have to participate in the "surprise". I'll just say everything my classmates ate was proven to be edible, and possibly only enjoyable to select few people on this planet.

Food Safety is pretty easy to figure out. It's Serv Safe, if you've ever had to take a sanitation class then you get the jist of this one. Pretty boring, pretty common sense, pretty easy. there was a little I got out of it so I would hardly say it was a waste. It's hard to push yourself to take a class like that, but I'm really happy I did because now I'm more confident in my decision making.

I just finsished my Finals and next week I will start C block which is Baking Ingredients and Equipment Technology + Principles of design. Should be interesting.

I wanted to say the last 6 weeks have been amazing. I've been getting involved with the SGA, the one at my highschool was useless but the one here seems to have a pretty big impact on the everyday cycle of the school. Soon I will be joining the Beer Club and hopefully bringing the brew master from a micro brewery I work at up to hold a seminar. Also the eating has been fantastic. When I say "on stage" I'm referring to "B block" who seats up on stage in Farq. hall and is served a 3 course meal plus an amuse usually, during lunch or dinner. it's really a great way to get to know your class mates, especially the ones your not in class with. On tuesday I start eating at the kitchens. There are 6 kitchens I believe you can get food from. They all have there own menus, being Asian, Cuisines of the Americas, Cuisine of Europe, etc, and the menu changes constantly so theres always 5 or 6 new things to pick from. Not to mention when you get that you usually have a selction of appetizer the class prepares such as salads. Once you get in Farq hall there is one table set up with baskets holding large amounts of fresh breads from, you guessed it, bread class. There is another 3 tables set up soley for plated desserts and cakes you can take at random. You can see I definately don't complain about the food situation.


Hopefully soon I will have my report from our "Grand Buffet" held once at the end of each block (3 weeks), which is outstanding. I hope you enjoy this and please feel free to ask and questions, there is so much to say I can't remember it all.

Edited by chiantiglace, 21 January 2006 - 01:53 AM.

Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#2 Pan

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:00 AM

I really enjoyed reading that. For now, I have only one question: What's an SGA?

Enjoy your current block!

#3 chiantiglace

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:02 AM

Student Government Assosciation
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#4 Pan

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:13 AM

Oh, I think that was called SGO at Purchase when I was there. What does it do at CIA?

#5 Kent Wang

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 08:22 AM

Very cool.

My dream is to retire early and go to the CIA just for self-education, without any plans to go into the industry after graduation. Have you met any luck ducks like that?

#6 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 11:23 AM

Thanks Chianitglace. I can't wait to see photos of the food/buffets, etc...

#7 chiantiglace

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 06:41 PM

Alright, I finally loaded all the images up and they are ready to go. I must say that what you are about to see is not all that was there. I showed up about 10 minutes late and I couldn't get a lot of pictures because there were just too many people in the way, plus I was trying to eat/taste myself. This "Grande Buffet" is a product of about 7+ classes worth of food and production. That I know of is Hearth Breads and rolls class, Cookies, Tarts, and Mignardises, Individual and Production Pastries, Basic and Classical Cakes, Special Occasion Cakes (the ones on display), Chocolates and Confections, Garde Manger, and I beleive Skills 1 and 2. I'm not sure. The entire Buffet is performed by the Banquet class. You can see there is a lot of chaos going on but somehow it all comes out rather professional. This is the second time I've attended since I've been at school, and the first time I was too in awe to take pictures. Even this round I was a little overwhelmed.

Let's start with a few bread pics, remember what you see is not all that was there, only what I could find at certain times.
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Heres some pictures of the cuisine
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And finally the desserts. These came out much better than last three weeks, but thats my own personal opinion.
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I must say there was a lot to gather. Everytime something ran out it wasn't like it was instantly replaced with the same thing. Instead whatever ran out was replaced with something different. So the key is to constantly scrounge around because you really don't know what your going to get. Students are constantly comming in will full trays and out with empty ones. The best bet is to pick stuff of the trays before they get to their designated table. Also there were a few things floating around "cocktail" style like granitas (coffee, rose, and lemon I think), aswell as a "marrow custard". Didnt look too appetizing to me, more like mini drain pans :laugh: . All In all it was a great time. But just to say one more time, whats in the pictures is probably only 1/3-1/4 of what there was throughout. A lot of those empty spots on the tables just mean there running out of product. In the beginning the tables are covere dish to dish.

Right now I am in the process of getting a list of everything from the buffet. Since there is so many things and classes its hard to gather the information.

Enjoy.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#8 chiantiglace

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 07:00 PM

Very cool.

My dream is to retire early and go to the CIA just for self-education, without any plans to go into the industry after graduation. Have you met any luck ducks like that?

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No retiree's but I have met several older people. 2 classes ahead of me I think, there is a 55 year old man that use to me a car saleman I beleive. I've seen and Older couple as students, probably in there mid 40's. They probably made some good money earlier, now they want to open up a restaurant and are going to school. I see things like that all the time. there are a couple 30 year olds in my class off the top of my head as well.

I will say this, nobody cares about age, race, or well anything here. I think students hold a certain level of pride depending on skill level but thats about it. This is a school of passion, well, it should be.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#9 kalypso

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 07:18 PM

Very cool. And the pictures are great, they're kind of whetting my appetite for dinner, which is in the oven.

I've had the opportunity to take a couple of classes at the CIA-Greystone in Napa. Really awesome. The kitchens are such a pleasure to work in because they are so well laid out and so complete. And, of course, the food that's produced no matter how good or bad the students are is almost always wonderful.

Good luck on your studies. Keep posting, I've enjoyed reading about your experiences.

#10 Badiane

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 07:44 PM

You must let me know if you encounter my old nemesis, Olivier Andreini...I understand he is a chef instructor there now. He was one of the chefs at the cooking school I went to. We nearly came to blows a couple of times - I nearly quit during exams, we had such a go 'round. You must let me know if he is still in the habit of yelling 'ok, people, LETS HAVE IT' when it's time to plate....

He scared the crap out of me...must have worked, he is still one of the voices in my head :smile:
Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

#11 Rebcameron

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 11:19 PM

Thanks Chiantiglace! I graduated from the CIA last June...your pics bring back a lot of memories!

As far as the other question regarding older students. There are certain times throughout the year where enrollment has a higher percentage of older students. I was 28 when I started at the CIA in 2003...this was my second time at college! The first time a majored in nutrition and became a dietitian. I began my courses in June at the CIA and most of my classmates were people who were changing careers or had years of industry experience. After externship, I came back to school with a new group and I was the oldest student. At first it was a little strange...we're talking a lot of 18-20 year olds...but I have to say I definitely enjoyed my group. I think there was more excitement and interest in the younger group than the former.

#12 eJulia

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 12:01 PM

That buffet is unbelievable! How much weight is gained during an average tenure at CIA? I would blow up to record proportions with awesome food like that!

Seriously, you are lucky to be going to school in such a beautiful, renowned place. We are lucky you are willing to blog! Keep up the good work!
"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”
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#13 chiantiglace

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 12:10 PM

How much weight is gained during an average tenure at CIA?


Believe it or not, a study was actually done. The avaerage person is sad to gain 20-30 lb's within in the first semester. Then it dies down because your not eating 3 course meals, and quite frankly you get kind of sick of eating like a king :biggrin: .

Though in relation I have only gained 5 lbs, and quite possible could be more muscle than fat gain. I finally have a gym to go to and am there every single day.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#14 FabulousFoodBabe

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 12:23 PM

You must let me know if you encounter my old nemesis, Olivier Andreini...I understand he is a chef instructor there now.  He was one of the chefs at the cooking school I went to.  We nearly came to blows a couple of times - I nearly quit during exams, we had such a go 'round.    You must let me know if he is still in the habit of yelling 'ok, people, LETS HAVE IT' when it's time to plate....

He scared the crap out of me...must have worked, he is still one of the voices in my head  :smile:

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OMG< Chef Andreini! He's now a CMC. I worked with him on a few special projects, and he took over about half our Garde Manger class.

Yeah, I channel my old chefs, too. I still can't break down a salmon without hearing, "Fabby, DONOTDONOTDONOT STOP YOUR KNIFE!" <-- Chef Clark.

Oh, Chianti -- about the "older" students at the CIA. I was one of them and, yeah, no one is supposed to care if you're older, but the other students pretty much do. Girls are especially tough on older women and to that I always said, "One day you, too, will be 40!" The assumption is made immediately that you're a housewife with a hobby, or a retiree, or just playing at it, even if you've been in the industry for years and years. As many 19 year olds play at it as do 39 year olds. I could write a book ...

That said, the friends I made there are lifelong; I'm always in touch with my chefs and professors. Just spoke with a guy from my team today; he's a full 20 years younger than me, lives 500 miles away, and I still count him among my best friends.

Have fun and start working on that Externship right now! It will be here before you know it. This is bringing back some memories. Snif.


Edited to add: I was 45 when I started!

Edited by FabulousFoodBabe, 22 January 2006 - 12:26 PM.

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#15 Pan

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 01:07 PM

Everyone, please remember that some of the folks reading this are not CIA grads, so please watch the acronyms. What does CMC stand for? Off the top of my head, I thought of "chef management consultant," but I doubt it.

#16 godito

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 03:37 PM

I'm glad to see they finished Anton Plaza... looks pretty cool. They were building it when I graduated. I was affraid of what they were gonna do with that space, as it was one of my favorite spots. Then, I came back from my externship and they were removing dirt to start construction.

Welcome, chiantiglace, to the CIA. I trully enjoyed my stay there. Wish you the best of lucks, and make use of your time as a student. Get involved, get a job, talk to every chef out there. They love it when you do... just as long as you do it respectfully.

And about chef Andreini... he's a CMC now... wow! He tought gardemanger to my sister class, and they all hated him. I guess he's pretty arrogant, huh?

CMC stands for Certified Master Chef... the certification is international, approved by some board... the candidates have to go through a whole week of tests to be certifed. Those tests are taken at the CIA, in a pretty cool kitchen.

EDITED TO ADD: nice pictures!

Edited by godito, 22 January 2006 - 03:39 PM.

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#17 M.X.Hassett

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 04:19 PM

Awesome, maybe I will run into you around campus in one of the upcoming semesters.

Edit: What is that great looking plate on your profile page?

Edited by M.X.Hassett, 22 January 2006 - 04:21 PM.

Matthew Xavier Hassett aka "M.X.Hassett"

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters-it is vulgarly called bittered sling and is supposed to be an exellent electioneering potion..."
- Balance and Columbian Repository. May 13, 1806

#18 chiantiglace

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 04:53 PM

Unfortunately, or maybe in this case fortunately I don't have Chef Andreini. I am in the pastry program and don not take Garde Manger. Though I will warn my fellow students about him.

Girls, sorry to sound sexest, are the worst here. I htink that a lot of women will back me up on this. They are ruthless. And maybe it's because there barging into a predominately mans world. Of course this has been mentioned a million times. I do feel sorry for a lot of women depending on the situation here because some of these girls/women just don't want to get along. They really seem to let the tension get to them. I receive a lot of that similar tension, but when we are in the kitchen I treat you like a colleague, not a brother or sister or friend or enemy. A colleague should be unbiased and consistent. You do your job and I'll do mine. Our rythym must flow like water. When we get outside of the kitchen I don't care if you want to avoid me, ignore me, harass me whatever. But when were in the kitchen communication and production are key. But this is why were at school, to hopefully gain these traits.

It's funny you mention this situation because currently we have to pick "group leader", and there was a rumour going around that I was running. I am 1 of 4 males in a group of 16. Basically every single female has decided that they do not want a male as there leader no matter of there stature. Can we come back to that whole "domination" thing again. Women fight to be recognized, to be equal and to show they can be just as strong as a man. But a monopoly is not a fight. So what is the pride in playing games like reality tv shows. Form your little groups, exclude some people that don't fit right and cut each others throat. This is not how the kitchen system should run yet this is what is falling into place. Maybe it's the males fault for so many years of pushing down women. But I have worked for several women in my life and showed them the same respect as men. If you know what you are doing I will listen to you all day long. I will pick your brain apart. But if you are foolish, arrogant and a liar I have nothing to offer you, nor you have nothing for me. I cannot tolerate lack of character that drives some of the students here. I will not run for group leader unless it's a unanimous decision to place me up there. Which it will not be. I have a feeling until extern there will be a lot of knee bashing, refering to the fact that somebody is not going to not like whoever is the "leader" and will do whatever they can to knock them down. As far as I'm concerned all I want is my group to pay attention and excel. The group will affect my appearance as well, so I will be doing everything I can to push people along, atleast at an expected rate, hopefully an excelerated rate.

Please do not take anythign I said affensively. I could careless of sex, race, place of origin, etc. All I'm concerned about is the progressive learning of myself and my peers. I'm just trying to give everyone an overall idea of the frustration that may occur.

Pan, the acronyms are given from the ACF (American Culinary Federation). Which surprisingly enough is not spoken of very much in this soceity. There are 12 levels of being certified by the ACF, Starting with Certified Culinarian to the Certified Master Chef. Theres also degrees of Pastry chef too. We Have 10 CMC's on campus and 1 CMPC. There are 65 total CMC's and 8 total CMPC's. CIA has the highest concetration of Certified masters for any school in the world. ACF is the leading "apprenticship" program in the world. Even though there is a world group, it is lead by the ACF, there for each countries around the world is more or less based on the ACF's structure. The CIA and ACF is directly linked together, and the CIA is the only school not certified upon graduation, do you know why? Simply because they say we set the standards for the ACF. Isn't that a load of cocky BS. hahaha.


Edit: What is that great looking plate on your profile page?


Egulleteers Plated Desserts

I think you can easily find your answer here. thanks for asking.

Edited by chiantiglace, 22 January 2006 - 04:58 PM.

Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#19 M.X.Hassett

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 05:05 PM

Awesome Chianti Souffle Glace with Poached Pear Tart.
, and thanks for the insight into the CIA do you as I do when telling people you plan/are going to the CIA get weird looks and reference to foreign peoples and espionage :wink: .

Edited by M.X.Hassett, 22 January 2006 - 05:07 PM.

Matthew Xavier Hassett aka "M.X.Hassett"

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters-it is vulgarly called bittered sling and is supposed to be an exellent electioneering potion..."
- Balance and Columbian Repository. May 13, 1806

#20 PicnicChef

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 05:25 PM

[OMG< Chef Andreini! He's now a CMC. I worked with him on a few special projects, and he took over about half our Garde Manger class.

Yeah, I channel my old chefs, too. I still can't break down a salmon without hearing, "Fabby, DONOTDONOTDONOT STOP YOUR KNIFE!" <-- Chef Clark.

I was 37 when I started the CIA. Chef Clark...Gee, at least I can still filet one heck of a flounder, or a tuna..or whatever gets thrown at me. Chef Arnone, a CMC will be coming to my shoppe in New Jersey. We're doing a demo together! The friends you make at CIA are wonderful. I talk to many friends from my block frequently. Just today, as a matter of fact!

Enjoy the CIA
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#21 JasmineL

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 05:28 PM

Thanks for sharing your experiences. My friend just graduated a few days ago (Pastry). I can not wait for her to come home. ;)

#22 PicnicChef

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 05:28 PM

[It's funny you mention this situation because currently we have to pick "group leader", and there was a rumour going around that I was running. I am 1 of 4 males in a group of 16.

I have a feeling until extern there will be a lot of knee bashing, refering to the fact that somebody is not going to not like whoever is the "leader" and will do whatever they can to knock them down.

Hey! Don't worry about the group leader thing. In the beginning, it is a big deal, buy the fourth or fifth block, you'll all be one group and the natural leaders will lead the group to success, regardless of the person wearing the little gold toque pin!

#23 jgarner53

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 05:38 PM

Wow, exciting to read! What do you plan to do or where do you want to go when you're done? How long is the Pastry program at the CIA? Do you want to work at a high-end hotel or resort? Do you have a focus on something (like wedding cakes)?
"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

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#24 chiantiglace

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 06:01 PM

I've been doing a lot of thinking about Extern. There are so many options. I just asked Sam Mason on his thread if I could extern with him :laugh: . More than likely that won't happen, but would be great. I have in mind so far, Park Avenue Cafe, The Breakers, Le Fountain Blue, Somwhere in San Diego would be great or possibly New Zealand. Both very far. I've been giving most concentration to Miami and NYC, but still a lot of other places in the back of my mind, like the Marriot in Arizona.

I definately do not want to go to Vegas simply because I applied to the Belagio previously and plan to go there after graduation. Don't really want to extern a future employment site. I'd like to go somewhere that probability looks that I won't ever live. Somwhere I want to experience but not thrive in. Maybe Key West. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

I'm leaning more towards plated dessert. But the real passion for me is the sculptures. I know that is a select group of people that get to do it, but I'm pushing all the more everyday.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#25 M.X.Hassett

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 06:06 PM

But the real passion for me is the sculptures.  I know that is a select group of people that get to do it, but I'm pushing all the more everyday.

View Post

You mean sugar sculpture? If you do regardless of possible future points of employment L. Vegas may be the best place to extern for that genre.
Matthew Xavier Hassett aka "M.X.Hassett"

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters-it is vulgarly called bittered sling and is supposed to be an exellent electioneering potion..."
- Balance and Columbian Repository. May 13, 1806

#26 daniellewiley

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 07:29 PM

Girls, sorry to sound sexest, are the worst here.  I htink that a lot of women will back me up on this.  They are ruthless.  And maybe it's because there barging into a predominately mans world. 


Ha, maybe that explains something I experienced about 14 years ago! I was a freshman at Vassar, about 30 minutes away from the CIA, and a bunch of guys from the CIA came to our school to party. I guess they heard that we had wayyy more women than men. :laugh:

Well, they were horrid! Hitting on EVERYONE, and they completely vandalized our dorm. Here's the funny thing - they vandalized the dorm with FOOD! We had ketchup and mustard all over our bathroom walls!!
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#27 FabulousFoodBabe

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 04:51 AM

I can see that the CMC (try saying that five times before coffee!) has been answered.

I really liked Chef Andreini. He's quite a character and has about the best story I've heard, about how he came to be a CIA instructor.

Group leaders ... LOL! We kicked our first one to the curb; he was a drunk (at 22, no less) and we just had to boot him. It means so, so much at first and believe me, you'll have to work hard to find someone to do it after Externship. It's truly a thankless job, especially when you pull a chef who gives leaders a grade based on how well they make the team behave. (And some chefs just hate group leaders in general ...)

Some of the younger women there treat CIA like an extension of high school, which is a shame for them. My team was very small, mostly male, and they politely informed me that "Fabby Rocks, baby!"

And I does. And did. Keep it coming, chianti. I'm loving this!
"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office

#28 chiantiglace

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 11:50 AM

Some of the younger women there treat CIA like an extension of high school, which is a shame for them. My team was very small, mostly male, and they politely informed me that "Fabby Rocks, baby!"



I couldn't say this any better. The truth be told, the girls that are into to it, love it, drive for it are even high praised by the guys. We find it really cool to hang out with a girl that feels like us. They are put in the spotlight sometimes.

The whole extension of high school speaks so perfectly. And there are a couple guys like that. But they don't seem to last long. Guys who aren't into this seem to quit faster. But the girls fitting this description seem to feel, I guess pressured by there parents maybe? There is one girl that fits this experience, and she is always commenting her parents won't let her miss a class, or her parents won't allow a B. Something like that. I'm going to be helping here any way I can because shes like a headstrong puppy that wants to be the leader of the pack. Not knowing whats out there to snatch her up. The last thing I'd want it someone like that to break, could be dangerous to me :laugh: .
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#29 Badiane

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 12:06 PM

I really liked Chef Andreini.  He's quite a character and has about the best story I've heard, about how he came to be a CIA instructor.

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I'm so glad he's still out there terrorizing young chefs...while I could have cheerfully gutted and barbecued him, I know he only rode me like he did because he cared and thought I had it in me to succeed. If he could only see me now...I know he would be proud. I am what I am (at least in the kitchen) due in part to his extreme drive for perfection.

There are several cringe-worthy memories about him in my head...to this day I cannot eat mango salsa without thinking of him...and I still guard his recipe for Pear Anise soup with my life - he told us that if he ever came to someplace we worked and saw it on the menu he would gut us like a halibut. Every time I make it, I toast his memory.

I really MUST email that man...

Awesome stories in this thread...really brings back those days in culinary school.
Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

#30 FabulousFoodBabe

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 03:37 PM

I'm so glad he's still out there terrorizing young chefs...while I could have cheerfully gutted and barbecued him, I know he only rode me like he did because he cared and thought I had it in me to succeed.  If he could only see me now...I know he would be proud.  I am what I am (at least in the kitchen) due in part to his extreme drive for perfection.

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that was something I learned early on in school: that the people who the chefs pretty much stayed cool with, were the ones they may like and enjoy but didn't really care about. Best thing I did was in C block, was ask my chef after class what I could do to make myself absorb and learn faster. (That was after he kicked my butt from the moment I picked up the knife ...) I will never forget what he told me; it was a turning point in my education and something that no one in 15 years in the industry had told me before.

Do email Chef Andreini! I'm sure he'd remember you. He may have told us stories about you! :raz: :raz: Now, what would it take to get the pear anise recipe ... :hmmm:

Chianti, do you know which block Chef Schorner is teaching? He is amazing. He was our faculty advisor in Aspen a few years ago, and when Jacques Pepin came into the room to say hello to him, he told all of us that he (Pepin) was where he was, because of Schorner. (Watching him work was something I'll never forget.)
"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office