Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Salty Snacks


  • Please log in to reply
237 replies to this topic

#31 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,622 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:24 PM

Chinese salted preserved plums.
Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#32 jkonick

jkonick
  • participating member
  • 254 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 27 January 2006 - 02:06 AM

Salt bagels, which seem hard to find. My favorite are from Dunkin' Donuts. They taste like a cross between a bagel and a donut, covered in giant salt crystals... mmmmm. Likewise, their twisty cousin, the giant soft pretzel.

As far as prepackaged snack foods, Combos are a favorite, especially the pizza flavored ones. It's a doubly salty combo of pretzel and processed cheese. I don't think it gets much better. I'm a big fan of sweet and salty too, so anything Reese's (cups or pieces) and Baby Ruths. In fact, I just finished off a Nutrageous.

Edited by jkonick, 27 January 2006 - 02:08 AM.


#33 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 27 January 2006 - 05:02 AM

Chinese salted preserved plums.

View Post


I love these too! And also the dried, sweet/sour/salty dried orange peel that come in little pouches.

#34 miladyinsanity

miladyinsanity
  • participating member
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Manchester, UK

Posted 27 January 2006 - 10:50 AM

Ooh I love that orange peel.

Hmm, I need to get aunty number 3 to bring some down from my uncle's shop if they come down this week.
May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

#35 Sencha

Sencha
  • participating member
  • 90 posts

Posted 27 January 2006 - 01:41 PM

-dried squid and cuttlefish
-jerky
-corn chips

I also have a bad habit of raiding the tub of miso and eating a small spoon of miso when I want something salty and tasty.

#36 cavebutter

cavebutter
  • participating member
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 27 January 2006 - 02:23 PM

Toasted paper-thin rye bread with gruyere and cornichons
wasabi rice crackers

--Shameful--
Chex Mix (Hot 'n' Spicy)
Munchies (those bags full of Sun Chips, Doritos, Pretzels, Cheetos, etc.)
The ButterChurn (www.cavebutter.com/wp) -- One dude's venture into the magical world of baking, dude.

#37 robb

robb
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 24 June 2006 - 07:06 AM

I'm working my way through the many suggestions here. Does anyone know where I can find mojama in NYC or Boston (or in between)?

#38 CMA

CMA
  • participating member
  • 28 posts

Posted 24 June 2006 - 12:40 PM

It's hard to find "Bugles" since I have been living in NYC for the past 6 years, but when I lived in Florida they were ubiquitous. "Bugles" are a delicious salty, corn-based snack that are conically shaped somewhat like a bugle.

#39 dockhl

dockhl
  • participating member
  • 1,729 posts
  • Location:Paso Robles......Central Coast Wine Country

Posted 24 June 2006 - 03:28 PM

salt 'n vinegar potato chips sandwiching salami...........

#40 Toliver

Toliver
  • participating member
  • 4,562 posts
  • Location:Bakersfield, California

Posted 20 July 2006 - 12:03 PM

Pringles has a new flavor - Chili Cheese.
The chili flavor is nice but the chips are also quite salty....almost too salty.
If you're looking for something with chili flavor, stick with Fritos Chili Cheese which are addicitve.

Pringles also has another new flavor - Loaded Baked Potato.
As the review states, there is a hint of bacon :wub: in the flavor but not much else. There's no tang of sour cream or chive flavor either. I am in hopes that Pringles will chalk this up as a good start and take it back to the tasting lab for improvement.

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'
Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”
– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”


#41 Kouign Aman

Kouign Aman
  • participating member
  • 2,653 posts
  • Location:San Diego

Posted 20 July 2006 - 12:20 PM

-Asian pork fluff/floss (those dehydrated shreds of heavily-seasoned pork)

Yum. Where can I get this stuff? Where in the 99 Ranch market would I seek it?

Marmite on buttered toast :wub:

This is embarrassing.... in addition to most of the things already listed by others, when I really want salt I'll:
eat marmite by the spoonful.
eat beef bouillion cubes or granules
eat table salt (dip finger method)
My co-workers have photographic evidence of me enjoying their xmas gift to me some years ago: a red mineral salt-lick :blush:
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#42 gini

gini
  • participating member
  • 287 posts

Posted 21 July 2006 - 05:40 AM

Besides cheese - usually Papillion, but really, I'll take anything except for plastic cheese - I really like Garden of Eatin's Sea Salt Pita Chips. Could I make these at home? Sure. But there's nothing quite so satisfying as eating these straight out of the bag.
Eating pizza with a fork and knife is like making love through an interpreter.

#43 FoodMuse

FoodMuse
  • participating member
  • 274 posts
  • Location:New York, NY 1036

Posted 21 July 2006 - 08:39 AM

MCA,
I also love Bugles. I went to the Fancy Food Show in NY last week and tried Polenta crackers shaped like conchiglie pasta that tasted very similar to Bugles. The only difference besides the shape is Bugles are a bit sweeter, probably due to added corn syrup. Here's a recipe for Polenta snacks I'm looking forward to trying for my next dinner party.

Salt is my downfall. Maybe I should just install a salt lick in the kitchen, then I wouldn't even need to bother with the food.

Do margaritas with a salt rim count?
Grace

edited to fix all my misspelled words

Edited by FoodMuse, 21 July 2006 - 02:16 PM.

Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking
www.fearlesscooking.tv
My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010
Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

#44 tupac17616

tupac17616
  • participating member
  • 1,224 posts

Posted 21 July 2006 - 11:57 AM

I'm working my way through the many suggestions here.  Does anyone know where I can find mojama in NYC or Boston (or in between)?


Despana on Broome Street in NYC has mojama.

#45 Josefinajoisey

Josefinajoisey
  • participating member
  • 118 posts
  • Location:Joisey

Posted 22 July 2006 - 02:18 PM

Nothing too fancy...bring on the salt!

Garlic bagel chips
Pretzel Chips (I forget the brand, they're fairly new in NJ, and great with hummus)

#46 robb

robb
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 23 July 2006 - 04:41 AM

I'm working my way through the many suggestions here.  Does anyone know where I can find mojama in NYC or Boston (or in between)?


Despana on Broome Street in NYC has mojama.

View Post



Thanks!

#47 MarketStEl

MarketStEl
  • participating member
  • 3,722 posts
  • Location:Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

Posted 23 July 2006 - 06:18 AM

First things first:

Have I stepped into some weird parallel universe where no one eats fried pork rinds?

Yummy and crunchy in a way no other dry salty snack is. Of course, being a barbecue fiend as well, my preference is for Utz Bar-B-Q rinds.

(Edited to add: Speaking of yummy and crunchy, I have some advice for Joseph Foy, the owner of Bridget Foy's restaurant on South Street: You should give serious consideration to bagging the cracklin' off that gorgeous roast pig you served at yesterday's Slow Food fundraiser on Head House Square and selling it as a snack.)


I am addicted to 'wheat thins' crackers.
Oh man, soooo salty and soothing. Try regular or the honey variety. The reduced fat ones are great too - I actually prefer them to regular.
Yes, I'm a salt addict.  :sad:

View Post


I actually find Wheat Thins an interesting mix of sweet and salty.

I generally buy Triscuits to satisfy this craving.

Does cheese count?

View Post


I think it does! One of my favorite salty snacks is thin slivers of very very old Dutch cheese.. with those lovely crunchy salt crystals.

another, less dignified one is anchovies, straight from the jar. Fortunately, I only get salt-cravings like that once a month :wacko:

View Post


Anchovies from the jar? I'll have to try that sometime. :hmmm: Sardines I do on occasion, but those are nowhere near as salty, if indeed they're salty at all.

As for the old Dutch cheese: the reason I like aged (clears throat) How-da is because it tastes almost like toffee. But if cheese counts as a salty snack, then I'm all in, being a big cheesehead.

Utz 'Special Dark' pretzels.  I don't know what I am going to do if they ever quit making these.  We used to gorge on the extra salty splits that the in laws would bring us back from semi-annual trips to Penn. Dutch-land and the last bag they brought is still on a shelf in the pantry.  They taste positively insipid after the Special Darks. [emphasis added]

View Post


Utz is one of the biggest-selling chip brands in the country (#4, last I looked), so I doubt they'll go out of business anytime soon.

But if you are jonesin' for Dark Specials, just move to Pennsylvania and you're all set.

Pringles has a new flavor - Chili Cheese.
The chili flavor is nice but the chips are also quite salty....almost too salty.
If you're looking for something with chili flavor, stick with Fritos Chili Cheese which are addicitve.

Pringles also has another new flavor - Loaded Baked Potato.
As the review states, there is a hint of bacon  :wub:  in the flavor but not much else. There's no tang of sour cream or chive flavor either. I am in hopes that Pringles will chalk this up as a good start and take it back to the tasting lab for improvement.

View Post


A Pringles aficionado comes out of the closet!

Yes, they're totally artificial, but they're strangely addictive. Occasionally I have to have them instead of Utz.

Edited by MarketStEl, 23 July 2006 - 06:20 AM.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#48 prasantrin

prasantrin
  • legacy participant
  • 5,468 posts

Posted 23 July 2006 - 06:55 AM

First things first:

Have I stepped into some weird parallel universe where no one eats fried pork rinds?

Yummy and crunchy in a way no other dry salty snack is.  Of course, being a barbecue fiend as well, my preference is for Utz Bar-B-Q rinds.


I love pork rinds! But I like the Vietnamese/Thai kind that still has fat and a bit of meat attached to it. They never come in different flavours, and are very lightly salted (at least where I buy them), so I always add more salt. Sometimes I eat them with a bit of rice and...dare I say it...ketchup!

A Pringles aficionado comes out of the closet!

Yes, they're totally artificial, but they're strangely addictive.  Occasionally I have to have them instead of Utz.

View Post


I can eat a whole can of Pringles in one sitting. But I probably shouldn't admit that. :blush: They recently had a limited edition Grilled Cheese flavour, but I didn't much care for it. It wasn't as cheesy and the White Cheddar or Cheezums ones. A lot of my friends love the French Consomme flavour, but I've not been daring enough to buy an entire can to try them.

I wish I lived in Germany--they seem to have pretty amazing flavours!

#49 MarketStEl

MarketStEl
  • participating member
  • 3,722 posts
  • Location:Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

Posted 23 July 2006 - 07:43 PM

A Pringles aficionado comes out of the closet!

Yes, they're totally artificial, but they're strangely addictive.  Occasionally I have to have them instead of Utz.

View Post


I can eat a whole can of Pringles in one sitting. But I probably shouldn't admit that. :blush: They recently had a limited edition Grilled Cheese flavour, but I didn't much care for it. It wasn't as cheesy and the White Cheddar or Cheezums ones. A lot of my friends love the French Consomme flavour, but I've not been daring enough to buy an entire can to try them.

I wish I lived in Germany--they seem to have pretty amazing flavours!

View Post


Consomme flavor?

Available only in France, I assume? And if not, where in the States can these be found?

And what flavors do they have in Germany?

You should dig up that thread on unusual chip flavors and post them there as well.
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#50 prasantrin

prasantrin
  • legacy participant
  • 5,468 posts

Posted 23 July 2006 - 08:04 PM

Consomme flavor?

Available only in France, I assume?  And if not, where in the States can these be found?

And what flavors do they have in Germany?

You should dig up that thread on unusual chip flavors and post them there as well.

View Post


The consomme flavour is available in Japan. The World Pringles site doesn't have a Japanese link, so I can't even show you the tin. It's in an orange tin, and looks very much like the Cheezums ones (some of my friends bought them thinking they were the cheese ones!). When I get back, I'll take a picture of them if I can get up enough courage to buy them.

On the Pringles Germany site, they have ones called "Light Aromas". Three different flavours make up the line--Greek style cheese with a touch of avocado oil, Spicy Thai with a touch of coconut oil, and Red Paprika with touch of Olive Essence. I think they're 30% less fat, too.

I think these aren't German-specific flavours (the pictures on the German website have English on them), but I've never seen them in Canada or in Japan. I would imagine they might be available elsewhere in Europe, though.

#51 barritz

barritz
  • legacy participant
  • 36 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 24 July 2006 - 02:18 PM

Roasted crickets. I've never had any, but check out Loung Ung's description of them in her book First They Killed My Father: "Wrapped in green lotus leaf, the brown, glazed crickets smell of smoked wood and honey. They taste like salty burnt nuts." I also read they're good beer food. I'm thinking about making them for myself, but frankly I'm scared. Also, I'm not sure the best place to get them. I found a place that sells them online, but only in quantities of a thousand. They seem like a good source of protein, and not at all fattening. I'm surprised more people aren't using them as a diet food. Oh wait, now I remember, Westerners are afraid to eat insects. We should break this unfair taboo. I see a future in the west where insect eating outpaces chicken consumption. Across American, l imagine all-you-can-eat mealworm buffets, and resturants where the specials are roaches in a light, creamy fruit fly sauce and home made--backyard made, in fact--earthworm ravioli.

#52 gini

gini
  • participating member
  • 287 posts

Posted 25 July 2006 - 05:36 AM

Roasted crickets.  I've never had any, but check out Loung Ung's description of them in her book First They Killed My Father: "Wrapped in green lotus leaf, the brown, glazed crickets smell of smoked wood and honey. They taste like salty burnt nuts."  I also read they're good beer food.  I'm thinking about making them for myself, but frankly I'm scared.  Also, I'm not sure the best place to get them.  I found a place that sells them online, but only in quantities of a thousand.  They seem like a good source of protein, and not at all fattening.  I'm surprised more people aren't using them as a diet food.  Oh wait, now I remember, Westerners are afraid to eat insects.  We should break this unfair taboo.  I see a future in the west where insect eating outpaces chicken consumption.  Across American, l imagine all-you-can-eat mealworm buffets, and resturants where the specials are roaches in a light, creamy fruit fly sauce and home made--backyard made, in fact--earthworm ravioli.

View Post

:smile: Fried crickets are not particularly tasty - mostly just salty. There's a place around the corner from where I live that does cricket tacos - crunchy, to say the least.
Eating pizza with a fork and knife is like making love through an interpreter.

#53 LindaSEANYC

LindaSEANYC
  • participating member
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest

Posted 27 July 2006 - 12:01 PM

I just started buying Kettle Bakes Fully Loaded Pretzel Chips and man they hit the spot!!

#54 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 27 July 2006 - 01:00 PM

Baked/fried Ikan Bilis--little dried anchovies
...

View Post

I had a great salty snack using these at Betelnut, a pan Asian fusion restaurant in SF a few years ago.

It was described as a wok stir fry of small dried anchovies, chilies, garlic and peanuts.

I've always wanted to create this at home but haven't gotton around to it yet.

Does anyone know from what country this comes from (if it's not a fusion invention) and if so, what it is called?

A great salty snack to bring along for a hike is this version of Gorp:
salted cashew nuts, raisins and plain M'nM's.
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#55 pauladsous

pauladsous
  • participating member
  • 18 posts
  • Location:Lausanne, Switzerland,but FRANçAISE =)

Posted 30 August 2006 - 07:58 AM

Baked/fried Ikan Bilis--little dried anchovies
...

View Post

I had a great salty snack using these at Betelnut, a pan Asian fusion restaurant in SF a few years ago.

It was described as a wok stir fry of small dried anchovies, chilies, garlic and peanuts.

I've always wanted to create this at home but haven't gotton around to it yet.

Does anyone know from what country this comes from (if it's not a fusion invention) and if so, what it is called?

A great salty snack to bring along for a hike is this version of Gorp:
salted cashew nuts, raisins and plain M'nM's.

View Post



#56 pauladsous

pauladsous
  • participating member
  • 18 posts
  • Location:Lausanne, Switzerland,but FRANçAISE =)

Posted 30 August 2006 - 08:13 AM

Baked/fried Ikan Bilis--little dried anchovies
...

View Post

I had a great salty snack using these at Betelnut, a pan Asian fusion restaurant in SF a few years ago.

It was described as a wok stir fry of small dried anchovies, chilies, garlic and peanuts.

I've always wanted to create this at home but haven't gotton around to it yet.

Does anyone know from what country this comes from (if it's not a fusion invention) and if so, what it is called?

A great salty snack to bring along for a hike is this version of Gorp:
salted cashew nuts, raisins and plain M'nM's.

View Post



Bonjour (I'm all emotional as this is my first contribution and I hope my English is decent enough for you to get at least a vague idea of what I mean to say...huh...write :unsure: )

To answer your question , I believe those little pieces of spicy salty heaven are Indonesian andpossibly Malaysian as well.
I discovered them while visiting my father when he was working in Indonesia, which by the way is Snackers' paradise.
They have tons of little fried stuff to munch on and you can purchase them in bulk in ALL supermarkets. some are sweet-salty, others sweet & sour, loads of them very spicy, and all totally addictive ( I have never sampled any I disliked, and boy was it heavy-duty smplaing, more like pigging out :rolleyes: )
The names I remember were lumpia (mini spring roll), sumpia, emping manis or asam(like a fied thick corn flake either sweet or spicy), kachang goreng (peanuts), ikan terie (small fishes too), peteh goreng (some sort of fried bean)
Basically, "gorenbg means fried like nasi gorend or bami goreng (fried rice or noodles), and asin, manis, asam, mean stuff like sweet, salty, spicy,...
Unfortunately,I did develop quite a passion for those nibbles which there's no way I'll ever find in Switzerland where I live. I just find some when I go to Paris......which regretfully doesn't happen often enough.
Hope this was helpful and not too boring to read or inaccurate
A bientôt

View Post



#57 kiliki

kiliki
  • participating member
  • 1,090 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 30 August 2006 - 04:24 PM

My new favorite salty snack: Garbonzo beans roasted in oil and salted.

#58 Domestic Goddess

Domestic Goddess
  • participating member
  • 1,738 posts
  • Location:South Korea, orig. from Philippines

Posted 05 January 2007 - 07:54 AM

Whenever we go to a big grocery store here in Kroea like LotteMart of E-Mart, I always pick up a couple of trays of these:

Takoyaki balls

Posted Image

Takotchi skewers (grilled chicken)

Posted Image
Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

#59 CMA

CMA
  • participating member
  • 28 posts

Posted 07 January 2007 - 07:54 PM

Recently bought some "Sundried Tomato and Basil" Wheat Thins, and they are surprisingly good with strong sundried tomato and basil flavors. True to the topic posting title they are, in fact, quite salty as well, but I'd give them a B+ overall.

#60 Sararwelch

Sararwelch
  • participating member
  • 124 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 08 January 2007 - 01:19 PM

I could live on hummus and pita chips. I usually buy sea salt or sesame multigrain pita chips. The cinnamon sugar pita chips are great for a sweet snack.