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Asian Noodle Soups--Cook-Off 18

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131 replies to this topic

#121 Austin

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 05:01 AM

khadija: Good question--I'd be curious to know about the noodles as well. My guess is that the Burmese generally use the dried noodles. At any Burmese market I've been to in northern Thailand and Burma there are lots of packaged dried noodles, but I've never seen (or at least never really noticed) the fresh ones. Incidentally, the noodles used in khao soi are a bit of a mystery as well. I've never seen them for sale in markets or anything. Perhaps the vendors make their own, or as khao soi is not generally made at home, they're simply not commerciallly available.

I did an article on Burmese food in Bangkok for ThaiDay, a local paper, which includes a pic of a bowl of ohn no hkauk hswe. It can be found here. There's also lots of info on khao soi on my blog if you search around, and an article I wrote about khao soi for the Bangkok Post can be downloaded here.

Look forward to seeing your results!

#122 snowangel

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 11:09 PM

Venison khao soi again, but this time, I fried the noodles, which just made the dish. And, my local Asian joint does their own pickled greens. They are so yummy. I made enough of this that there is another meal in the freezer (sans noodles, which I will do ala minute).

Paul, Diana and I agreed that this is one of our favorite comfort dishes -- in this household, it beats out chicken noodle soup. Slurp, slurp, slurp. This takes me back to those days in Chieng Mai in the early 70's when things were sleepy...

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#123 SheenaGreena

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 08:06 PM

is kuksu the same as gook su? I hate spelling out korean words, it makes absolutely no sense to me and makes me sound and look ridiculous :blink:

I wish I had a digital camera so bad, because I would make my version of gook su. It's alot different than marco polo's, because I use different noodles and use chicken or turkey stock instead of beef.


also, with your "kuksu", do you make an anchovy broth? I eat mine that way with a garnish of sesame seeds, julienned and blanched zuchini and some strips of omelet. I like the anchovy broth of course because its clear and because it is really subtle.
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#124 Marco_Polo

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 11:19 PM

is kuksu the same as gook su? ...

I wish I had a digital camera so bad, because I would make my version of gook su.  It's alot different than marco polo's, because I use different noodles and use chicken or turkey stock instead of beef.


Hi Sheena, yeah, it's the same thing just a different transliteration. Would love to know how you make it. I sometimes use chicken broth. The anchovy sounds great, too!

Marc

#125 SheenaGreena

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 03:40 PM

is kuksu the same as gook su? ...

I wish I had a digital camera so bad, because I would make my version of gook su.  It's alot different than marco polo's, because I use different noodles and use chicken or turkey stock instead of beef.


Hi Sheena, yeah, it's the same thing just a different transliteration. Would love to know how you make it. I sometimes use chicken broth. The anchovy sounds great, too!

Marc

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very easy really: make your basic chicken stock with some chicken, garlic, and onions. You can add carrots and celery if you like, but I tend to stick with my basic version. Then after 2 hours or so I strain the broth, pick the chicken meat off the chicken and do the following:

I cut some potatos into strips and boil them in the chicken stock until cooked through and then I add some slices of onion and zuchini. Then of course you add the noodles, but I don't use the skinny vermicelli noodles.

I use these:
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I took that from a google search by the way...

then I garnish the soup with some soy sauce that has some go chu marinating in it. It basically makes the soy sauce spicy.


btw, kal gook soo is a great way to utilize that leftover turkey from thanksgiving dinner

Edited by SheenaGreena, 09 November 2006 - 03:41 PM.

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#126 Marco_Polo

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 04:02 PM

but I don't use the skinny vermicelli noodles. 

I use these:
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Wow, those big fat noodles look great, Sheena. I'm going to try and source some for T-day leftovers! Thanks.
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#127 SheenaGreena

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 06:14 PM

they are easy to find in the korean grocery store. they are usually in the refridgerated section because they aren't dried like other noodles.
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#128 Jon Savage

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 09:03 PM

I made Bun Vit ( Vietmamese Duck Noodle Soup) the other day that was sublime.
The recipe was from a (Vietnamese) colleague's mom and it rocked.
Simple and to the point. The stock was nothing more than a duck, ginger, onion, nuc mam a little sugar.

Nice ginger nuc mam dipping sauce for the meat.

Sublime.

Jon

 

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#129 Utenya

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 02:00 PM

I made beef noodle soup the other day. It's a recipe that I've been continuously playing around with. It has beef shank & bones, five spice, onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes, and both light and dark soy sauces.

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#130 Chris Amirault

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 02:14 PM

Looks great. What kind of noodles are those?
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#131 Utenya

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 11:37 PM

I used some noodles I found at my local Chinese grocery market (Ranch 99). They were "Taiwanese Noodles". I can't read the first character, but I think it is Yang Chun Mian. They are semi chewy, made from all purpose flour, not the semolina which gives that good al dente bite. But I enjoy that kind of texture a lot when it comes to asian style noodle soups.

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#132 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 02:21 AM

A more recent eGullet discussion prompted me to dig up this fossil. The intent was to make pho but I wasn't going to tie myself to any particular set of rules.

I made a broth using beef short ribs, beef shin and pork 'soup bones'. I wanted to add some oxtail to the mix but the butcher was all out. The broth was seasoned with the obligatory blackened onions and ginger, as well as star anise, black peppercorns, coriander seeds, cloves and cinnamon.Once the meat was tender I removed the bones and strained out the aromatics. Vegetablewise, I went with spring onions, bok choy, choy sum, bean shoots, carrots and chillies--all added right at the very end (the greens before everything else, as I wanted them to wilt). Noodles took the form of rice vermicelli.

It was okay. I really should've added some raw/rare meat at the end. If I could get them, I'd want neck bones instead of random 'soup bones'. The pork is very much something I want in there, tho'.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 13 May 2012 - 02:23 AM.

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