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Please help with cannele recipe


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#61 hedgehog

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Posted 07 March 2003 - 01:15 PM

thank you so much for taking the time to type out the recipe. It looks fantastic.

#62 Joni

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Posted 07 March 2003 - 03:11 PM

My thanks to you also for typing it out! As soon as my cannele molds arrive, I will make them!

#63 nightscotsman

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Posted 07 March 2003 - 07:12 PM

You're welcome - I hope they turn out well for you.

I don't mean to taunt, but here is a photo of one of mine cut in two so you can see the inside:

Posted Image

#64 col klink

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Posted 07 March 2003 - 07:33 PM

They were very tasty NSM, a little soft and gooey on the inside with a nice, almost crisp texture on the outside and all the while not too sweet, just a little to take the bite out of the chocolate. Good work!

#65 tighe

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Posted 07 March 2003 - 07:33 PM

I don't mean to taunt, but here is a photo of one of mine cut in two so you can see the inside

Dude!! What kind of cruel and sick mind do you have?? You expect to post pictures like that and still maintain public order? Oh, the humanity!!.....
Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.
- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

#66 mjc

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:23 AM

I don't mean to taunt, but here is a photo of one of mine cut in two so you can see the inside:

I made these chocolate canneles this weekend and was dissapointed in the outside texture, they were soft and not crispy. I have made the classic canneles many many times and they always come out with an excellent crispy crust. Col Klink says his were "almost crisp". What were your chocolate ones like?
Mike
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#67 nightscotsman

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:48 AM

I don't mean to taunt, but here is a photo of one of mine cut in two so you can see the inside:

I made these chocolate canneles this weekend and was dissapointed in the outside texture, they were soft and not crispy. I have made the classic canneles many many times and they always come out with an excellent crispy crust. Col Klink says his were "almost crisp". What were your chocolate ones like?

Mine were sort of crunchy/chewy. I did bake them for much longer than the recipe called for - he says 35 to 40 minutes and I let them go for over and hour. It's more difficult to tell when the chocolate ones are done since the batter starts out dark to begin with. The tops should be almost black when they are done. When they're getting close you can take one out and unmold it to check how the rest of the crust is dong, then put it back in if it's not ready. Don't let them go too long though, since they will get crisper as they cool.

Hope that helps. :smile:

#68 mjc

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Posted 07 May 2003 - 08:48 AM

There is an article about Canneles in today's LA times. I enjoyed this piece since it seemed to somewhat echo my experience and others on this board.
There is a second story about which is better: silicon or metal molds. She concludes silicon, because of ease and cost. I found this piece disapointing, as it seems that the writer might not really understand the tradition/flavor/"craftmanship" of the pastry. I think that using silicon definetly can easily lead to inferior product.

Edited by mjc, 07 May 2003 - 08:49 AM.

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#69 rickster

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Posted 07 May 2003 - 09:46 AM

I've tried 2 different types of silicon molds and 2 different recipes (Silverton's was one of them)and been very disappointed in the results. The crust is rubbery/gummy and they tend to cave in once unmolded. I haven't tried the extra long baking though. It's hard to justify the expense of copper molds though unless you are a real fan of these.

#70 nightscotsman

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Posted 07 May 2003 - 09:54 AM

It sounds to me from the second article that they only tried aluminum and not copper pans on the metal side. Hardly a complete and scientific test, especially since copper is the traditional type. I'll stick with my copper, thanks.

Also, the recipe from the first article is radically different from all of the others I've seen, both in books and on-line. None of the others included sweetened condensed milk, dry milk power, or water (why use dry milk and water - why not just use real milk?). Of course I'll have to try it and see if it really is better than Nancy's recipe.

#71 kitwilliams

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Posted 07 May 2003 - 03:13 PM

I too am again inspired to get back on the hunt for the perfect canneles bandwagon after seeing the LA Times article today. Finally purchased some beeswax at the farmers market today so will whip up some batter and report back tomorrow...but now, back to my Devon Apple Cake with Sundowner apples and Golden Flame raisins.
kit

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#72 mjc

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Posted 07 May 2003 - 06:14 PM

Finally purchased some beeswax at the farmers market today so will whip up some batter and report back tomorrow

Just a tip for using the beeswax: I usually melt it on the stove with equal parts of butter and wax. I put the butter and wax on a piece of foil in the pot, so that it doesn't make a mess and its easy to keep the extra. Also I've found that the brush you use to apply it, becomes almost impossible to clean.
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#73 kitwilliams

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 10:11 PM

For anyone who has not made canneles due to the high cost of the proper copper molds, I have now had great success with the silicon molds. I finally did the beeswax/butter treatment, used Nancy Silverton's recipe (although I reduce the sugar to just 400g (2 cups)) and they were very close to those that I have had at La Brea Bakery. Well, the ones at La Brea Bakery BEFORE it was sold. A beautiful, shiny crust that was crisp and chewy and the moist, custardy interior. And no problem holding their shape.

I'm sure if I were to compare them to canneles made in copper molds I would detect a difference in the crust. But these were damn good until I can afford the copper!

FYI, I got my molds at Bridge Kitchenware.
kit

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#74 nightscotsman

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 10:58 PM

Good to hear the silcone molds work well. What brand of molds did you end up using? Are they the black ones or the red ones?

I also finally got around to testing the Malgieri recipe that was published in the LA Times (which is the same as the one charlotte baker posted some time ago). They had a good, thick crust and nice interior, but I had the same problem with them rising out of the molds that I mentioned before. I think I will stick with the Silverton recipe since that's the one I've had the most success with.

#75 Marlene

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 04:44 AM

And kit your bees sound so cool!

They are, lou...we love them! But our neighbors are scared to death (ooh -- they are probably killer bees!!!) and keep threatening to call local authorities.

Just let them try :angry:

I'm going to move my question to a new thread so that it might get the attention it undoubtedly deserves. Ha! :biggrin:

I would never come out of my house! I'm allergic :angry:

There are some great recipes here, but I can't put them in the archive because they look like they all come directly from a cookbook. Can someone tell me whether any of them have been altered enough to meet our copywright requirements :rolleyes:

Edited by Marlene, 10 June 2003 - 04:48 AM.

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#76 Wolfert

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:48 AM

copper molds I would detect a difference in the crust.  But these were damn good until I can afford the copper! 

FYI, I got my molds at Bridge Kitchenware.

For anyone who has not made canneles due to the high cost of the proper copper molds, I have now had great success with the silicon molds.  I finally did the beeswax/butter treatment, used Nancy Silverton's recipe (although I reduce the sugar to just 400g (2 cups)) and they were very close to those that I have had at La Brea Bakery.  Well, the ones at La Brea Bakery BEFORE it was sold.  A beautiful, shiny crust that was crisp and chewy and the moist, custardy interior.  And no problem holding their shape.


Kit: did you use the same temperature and timing as suggested by nancy silverton? I've tried the gastroflex and was really disappointed with the glassy exterior. The moul'flex may be the way to go. I'm going to try it.
In the meantime, I would like to share a story, recipe and notes for canele de bordeaux which will appear in my new book coming out this fall. (My recipe originally appeared in Food Arts about two years ago.)
http://www.paula-wol...pes/canele.html

any comments would be much appreciated.

Edited by Wolfert, 10 June 2003 - 10:55 AM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#77 nightscotsman

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 11:13 AM

Great, another recipe I have to try. :hmmm:

Just kidding :smile: . Thanks for the great article, Paula. The recipe sounds very good and I appreciate all the details. One question: is there a reason the milk must be heated to exactly 183 F? Would it ruin the recipe if I were just to bring the milk to a boil and let it cool for a few minutes before adding it to the rest of the ingredients as Nancy Silverton directs?

#78 Wolfert

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 11:32 AM

I don't bring milk to a boil because the flavor tends to change. The temperature of 183 is just a conversion from the celsius given to me by chef Antoine.

By the way if you have a convection oven , the results are spectacular.
“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#79 charlotte baker

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 01:08 PM

Nightscotsman---I'm glad you tried the Michel Roux recipe I posted. His book was
published in 1995. I wonder if that was where Nick Malgieri got the recipe.

I've never had the " white ass " problem. I guess I've been lucky.

If you want to try a different way of using the cannele batter, pour the whole thing into a Nordicware Festival tube pan. Unmolds easily, has the same dark, crisp exterior, custardy interior and looks spectacular.

#80 trillium

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 01:46 PM

Does the batter cooked in Nordicware Bundt pans have the same dark, crisp exterior even without the butter/beeswax mixture? I'm very intrigued by this idea...I bought the a 10 c Bundt pan at Costco because it was cheaper then at a cookware store and it came with one of the 6 mini Bundts pan. I haven't figured out what to use the it for, but I love canneles.

regards,
trillium

#81 Wolfert

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 04:17 PM

for themini=bundt molds: simply brush lightly with butter. When they are black on the outside they're done.

Inside this fat cannele there's a skinny canele de bordeaux screaming to get out. EAt it as if it was for real!!!

Edited by Wolfert, 10 June 2003 - 04:19 PM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#82 Wolfert

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 04:26 PM

Nightscotsman---I'm glad you tried the Michel Roux recipe I posted. His book was
published in 1995. I wonder if that was where Nick Malgieri got the recipe.

I've never had the " white ass " problem. I guess I've been lucky.

If you want to try a different way of using the cannele batter, pour the whole thing into a Nordicware Festival tube pan. Unmolds easily, has the same dark, crisp exterior, custardy interior and looks spectacular.

I've never had the " white ass " problem. I guess I've been lucky.


I think you're very lucky. Other readers might find themselves stuck with "white asses" What to do?. Do what the the patissiers of Bordeaux do, run the tops under a broiler for a second to brown the crown.

Edited by Wolfert, 10 June 2003 - 04:39 PM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#83 nightscotsman

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 04:40 PM

I admire that you have never had that problem, but others might find themselves stuck. Just in case someone reading this does: here is what the patissiers of Bordeaux do,run the tops under a broiler for a second to brown the crown.

Ah-ha! tricky. Thanks for the tip. :smile:

#84 Wolfert

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 05:12 PM

[QUOTE] Here's what is happening - as the cannele starts to bake it expands and pushes itself up and out of the mold, leaving a big airspace between the batter and the bottom of the mold. This means that the top tends to burn and the bottom never browns. I've tried slipping a knife down the side of the mold to release the pressure when it starts to rise, but within minutes of putting them back in the oven they spring out of the pan again. I actually "re-seated" them about five times before giving up and letting them bake. I'm getting really frustrated! :wacko: QUOTE]

I just read the message above which was posted some time ago, but I didn't see any comment as followup. So allow me to offer a comment: the canele or cannele will sometimes rise and push itself up and out of the mold, but this is not a problem. If left alone to bake a full 2 hours the cannele or canele will return to its "starting place."

Edited by Wolfert, 10 June 2003 - 05:13 PM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#85 charlotte baker

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 07:09 PM

Trillium--Just butter the tube pan. It will unmold easily. If your tube pan has a non-stick surface don't use Pam. It will leave a sticky residue that is virtually impossible to remove.

#86 kitwilliams

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:13 PM

Good to hear the silcone molds work well. What brand of molds did you end up using? Are they the black ones or the red ones?

I've seen both the red and the black but mine are definitely rust colored. On the Bridge website they are called "Silicon Flex".


Kit: did you use the same temperature and timing as suggested by nancy silverton?


Yes, Paula, having lowered the temperature to 375 once, I have now decided that the 400 degrees for two hours does have the best results. Enjoyed the article too. Can't wait until I finally get to Bordeaux so that I can sample the ultimate!

I have batter in the frig right now! Fresh canelles tomorrow!
kit

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#87 Wolfert

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Posted 10 June 2003 - 11:06 PM

Kit:
I can see that caneles are your passion. Mine too! And your description of success with the silicone molds from Bridge kitchenware is very exciting. If the molds are the right size, that is each one has a 3 oz capacity. I certainly want to buy a few sheets from Bridges. Thank's so much for the tip.

If you have the time, would you mind answering some questions?
Do you chill the wax and butttered silicone molds before baking?
Are you using the large 3 ounce size mold?

Do you get a really good crackling crunch?

Is the texture of the filling a gentle rich custard?

Many thanks
Paula

Edited by Wolfert, 11 June 2003 - 08:23 AM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#88 kitwilliams

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Posted 11 June 2003 - 08:46 AM

Kit:
I can see that caneles are your passion. Mine too! And your description of success with the silicone molds from Bridge kitchenware is very exciting. If they are right size: 3 oz each I certainly want to buy a few sheets.  Thank you so much for the tip.

Do you mind answering some questions?
 
Do you chill the wax and butttered silicone molds before baking?
Are you using the large 3 ounce size mold?

Do you get a really good crackling crunch?
Is the texture of the filling a gentle rich custard?

Many thanks
Paula

Paula: The thing you need to know about me and cannele is that I've never eaten one in France. Payard and La Brea bakery are the only places I have experienced them. Just wanted to give you that little "heads up"! And nightscotsman is the true cannele expert on egullet! But I'm happy to share what I have learned.

I just sampled one from the batch I baked this morning. Interestingly, the batter sat for nearly 40 hours (I usually can't wait the required 24 hours due to impatience) and they did not rise as much. Nancy Silverton notes that the batter should be used within 48 hours so I pretty much stretched it to the limit and so found that closer to the 24 hour mark is better as far as size goes. However the interior seems to be even more custardy than usual. A true pleasure to bite into.

The crust is a good thickness and crackling crunchy both top and bottom however there is a ring around the middle where it just doesn't get the extreme top or bottom heat and a chewier rather than crisp crust has developed. That seems to be the norm for me however it is more pronounced in today's older batter. Is that a problem with copper molds as well or might it just be the silicon sheet molds which, due to their closeness, may not attract as much heat as do the individual copper molds.

My molds hold just short of 3 oz. Here is a link to the size at Bridge: http://www.bridgekit...Product_ID=2587

And yes, I wax/butter the molds and stick them in the freezer until ready to fill them.

But I did bring my milk to a full boil, as Nancy states. Next time I'll try the 183 degree mark. And I may have convection soon so look forward to seeing the results that will bring!

NSM: I'm trying chocolate cannele next!
kit

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Weebl

#89 mjc

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Posted 11 June 2003 - 09:02 AM

Are there differences between a cannele that you would get here in US from payard, la brea, or even balthazar (there is a clear difference between balthazar and payard actually), compared to what you would find in Bordeaux.

P.S.. I really liked your article Paula and will try your recipe.

I also agree with the use of a convection oven, I've gotten a much better cannele when using professional convection oven than from my regular oven at home.
Mike
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#90 Wolfert

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Posted 11 June 2003 - 09:12 AM

Thank you so much for the detailed answers to my questions. I'm curious enough to try one sheet and will order asap now that I know they are available in the 3 0z size.

Since I've only worked with copper molds, I have never experienced that middle line.

I,too, have found that waiting two days before using makes the caneles creamier inside. And, you can freeze the mixture and after defrosting and baking it is even better.

Some caneles are too cake-y inside for my taste. If you get around to trying my adaptation of patissier Antoine's recipe, you'll notice the procedure is quite different: milk is added to the egg yolks after they are mixed into the flour +butter+ sugar blend. In my experience this helps to create a very creamy interior.

I will try those chocolate ones as well. They look yummy.

Again, I can't thank you enough
“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.