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A pictorial guide to Chinese cooking ingredients

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#61 CFT

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 04:32 AM

I have come across an interesting recipe for Dried Lotus Root and Sparerib Soup in "Madame Chu's Chinese Cooking School" by Grace Zia Chu published in 1975. I mentions 2 ingredients with which I am unfamiliar:

4 slices of Wei-san spice

20 seeds chi-tzu spice

I have not been able to find any references online. Can someone here provide me with alternative names and/or appropriate online links?

why is "Wei" capitalized?

Should that be wai-san (huai shan) - 淮山? I wouldn't call it a spice, it is a tuber.

Not sure what "chi-tzu" might be - maybe gei zi (goji berries).
Best Wishes,
Chee Fai.

#62 dmreed

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 01:43 PM

I have come across an interesting recipe for Dried Lotus Root and Sparerib Soup in "Madame Chu's Chinese Cooking School" by Grace Zia Chu published in 1975. I mentions 2 ingredients with which I am unfamiliar:

4 slices of Wei-san spice

20 seeds chi-tzu spice

I have not been able to find any references online. Can someone here provide me with alternative names and/or appropriate online links?

why is "Wei" capitalized?

Should that be wai-san (huai shan) - 淮山? I wouldn't call it a spice, it is a tuber.

Not sure what "chi-tzu" might be - maybe gei zi (goji berries).

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your response is greatly appreciated...it verifies what I finally was able to connect online last night...again many thanks
The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#63 dmreed

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 12:12 AM

new topic! in The Mandarin Way by Cecilia Sun Yun Chiang there is a recipe for Beggar's Chicken which calls for "yellow rice". I have not been able to find a reference for "yellow rice". can someone tell me what it is?
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#64 BonVivantNL

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 12:44 AM

i was wandering around a market in Chengdu and saw this thing... does anyone know what this is? is it bamboo that's been salted? or has been roasted? or is it not bamboo at all?

#65 XiaoLing

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 04:41 PM

Looks like something wrapped in seaweed to me.

#66 jo-mel

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 07:17 PM

new topic! in The Mandarin Way by Cecilia Sun Yun Chiang there is a recipe for Beggar's Chicken which calls for "yellow rice". I have not been able to find a reference for "yellow rice". can someone tell me what it is?

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That's a hard one! I looked in my different Chinese ingredient books, and one book devoted just to rice, and the only reference in one of them was a recipe where turmeric was added to give the rice the yellow color. On line, there was one about using saffron to give the color.

But that isn't what Madam Chiang would be using.

I did find this google link:

http://www.angelfire...nd/rice_variety

Oh -- I just reread the recipe in her book and I think I found the answer. In the ingredient list, it asks for 1 Tbsp yellow rice in the left column. In the right column, it asks for wine or sherry -- but no amount. Sooooo I think it was just a funny misprint of the ingredients, and what you want is 1 Tbsp yellow rive wine or sherry. In the preparation of the dish, and in the actual stuffing mix, there is no mention of using rice.

Could that be the answer? That is is just yellow wine?

BTW -- I just love reading that book! I've reread it a couple of times, just soaking up her life. I had a chance to meet her in 1985 and she signed the book for me. a lovely and gracious woman!

#67 dmreed

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 10:57 PM

OK, here I go again! Reading a recipe in "The Chinese Festive Board" by Corrine Lamb originally published in 1935 and republished in 1985, I came across an ingredient called "chiang" which was described as "a particularly aromatic condiment which is made from red kidney beans. It is made best in the Province of Kuangtung, where Canton is located. It is not subject to decomposition and thus lends itself to export...". Another recipe refers to "sweet chiang". A further description and other names would be greatly appreciated.
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#68 muichoi

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 02:17 AM

Yellow bean paste and sweet bean paste is what's meant.

#69 dmreed

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 08:00 PM

Yellow bean paste and sweet bean paste is what's meant.

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thanks

except that it is supposedly made with red kidney beans?

maybe it is Tian mian jiang paste/sauce?

20090419@2240 update: the original recipe was called Cha Chiang Mien (pronounced ja jeong mien). Doing a Google search on "cha chiang mien" I found this on Wikipedia (which I think is OK to quote):

"Zha jiang mian (lit. "fried sauce noodles") is a northern Chinese dish consisting of thick wheat noodles topped with a mixture of ground pork stir-fried with fermented soybean paste."

with the following additional information:

"In Beijing cuisine, yellow soybean paste (黄酱; pinyin: huáng jiàng) is used, while in Tianjin and other parts of China sweet noodle sauce (甜面酱; pinyin: tián miàn jiàng), hoisin sauce (海鲜酱; pinyin: hǎi xiān jiàng), or dou ban jiang (豆瓣酱; pinyin: dòu bàn jiàng) may be used in place of the yellow soybean paste."

Most of these are already in my pantry ready to try the recipe.

So the author (it was published in 1935!) simply got it wrong regarding red kidney beans! But the recipes in the book look interesting and pretty decent for the year of publication.

thanks to an answer by hzrt8w to another of my questions, I now try to find alternative phonetic spellings!

Edited by dmreed, 19 April 2009 - 10:45 PM.

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#70 dmreed

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 12:34 AM

another ingredient question:

In Jacqueline M. Newman's "Cooking From China's Fujian Province", there is a recipe which calls for "swallow-skin wrapper" (made from meat and flour). I cannot find any recipe for such a wrapper?

Can someone provide me with such a recipe or a reference to such a recipe or maybe another name for the wrapper?

20090512@0127

I just found by a quite circuitous route another name for the skin "yanpi" made with mashed pork and flour...but I still cannot find instructions or a source for the skins :sad:

Edited by dmreed, 12 May 2009 - 01:30 AM.

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#71 Craig Bayliss

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 04:27 AM

another ingredient question:

In Jacqueline M. Newman's "Cooking From China's Fujian Province", there is a recipe which calls for "swallow-skin wrapper" (made from meat and flour). I cannot find any recipe for such a wrapper?

Can someone provide me with such a recipe or a reference to such a recipe or maybe another name for the wrapper?

20090512@0127

I just found by a quite circuitous route another name for the skin "yanpi" made with mashed pork and flour...but I still cannot find instructions or a source for the skins  :sad:

View Post


Strangely I was viewing this page earlier tonigt on a completely different mission. I was looking up transglutiminase or 'meat glue' -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surimi. Anyway, there might be info here that helps...

"Pork surimi also is mixed with flour and water to make a type of dumpling wrapper called "yèn pí" (燕皮 or 肉燕皮) that has the similar firm and bouncy texture of cooked surimi"

Edited by Craig Bayliss, 18 May 2009 - 04:32 AM.


#72 dmreed

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 05:41 AM

another ingredient question:

In Jacqueline M. Newman's "Cooking From China's Fujian Province", there is a recipe which calls for "swallow-skin wrapper" (made from meat and flour). I cannot find any recipe for such a wrapper?

Can someone provide me with such a recipe or a reference to such a recipe or maybe another name for the wrapper?

20090512@0127

I just found by a quite circuitous route another name for the skin "yanpi" made with mashed pork and flour...but I still cannot find instructions or a source for the skins  :sad:

View Post


Strangely I was viewing this page earlier tonigt on a completely different mission. I was looking up transglutiminase or 'meat glue' -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surimi. Anyway, there might be info here that helps...

"Pork surimi also is mixed with flour and water to make a type of dumpling wrapper called "yèn pí" (燕皮 or 肉燕皮) that has the similar firm and bouncy texture of cooked surimi"

View Post

thanks...that is definitely what I am looking for but there were no links to instructions for making it :sad:

but maybe I can find something with more searchs!
The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#73 dmreed

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 03:44 PM

Chinese Fish Sauce?

Does anyone here have a source for Chiu Chow (other names: Sitchow, Teochow) fish sauce?

How does it differ from Thai and other Asian fish sauces?
The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#74 jo-mel

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 08:36 PM

Chinese Fish Sauce?

Does anyone here have a source for Chiu Chow (other names: Sitchow, Teochow) fish sauce?

How does it differ from Thai and other Asian fish sauces?

View Post


The "Ma Family Cookbook" (Swatow food) said it is probably difficult to obtain. The ingredient list doesn't give a brand name, or explain if it is different from other fish sauces..

#75 dmreed

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 11:13 PM

I just ran across another Chinese ingredient of which I have no idea what it is and I cannot find anything online???

What is "starched shrimp meat"?
The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#76 sheetz

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 09:56 AM

I just ran across another Chinese ingredient of which I have no idea what it is and I cannot find anything online???

What is "starched shrimp meat"?

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Wouldn't that just be getting some shrimp and mixing it with a bit of cornstarch?

#77 v. gautam

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 08:14 PM

Re: pork surimi, meat with fat homogenized [emulsified] with crushed ice in a food processor will make a base [the same process used to create texture for hot dogs, a pork, beef, turkey or chicken surimi]. Then you may choose to add quantities of flour and seasonings to your desire. You may experiment with egg white powder, which will give stuctural strength the sheets but they may toughen the mixture if above a certain proportion.

Next comes the tricky part, of forming sheets about which I have no idea. I would guess chilling, and rolling out and shaping these: perhaps with a sushi mat and silicone baking sheet? Would they be steamed after this step or dry cooked or pan cooked with a water-oil spray?

One would suppose the initial amount and types of fat [liquid crystal/membrane structure] of the initial mixture, plus the matrix stucture of the emulsion with regard to its fluidity and protein mix, and beginning and end temperatures while grinding [much like temperature control while mixing bread dough in industrial machines] would have some effects on the final results.

I have no experience of Yan-pi; am merely re-constructing a logical chain, if that is of any help to you.

#78 dmreed

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 06:23 PM

Re: pork surimi, meat with fat homogenized [emulsified] with crushed ice in a food processor will make a base [the same process used to create texture for hot dogs, a pork, beef, turkey or chicken surimi]. Then you may choose to add quantities of flour and seasonings to your desire. You may experiment with egg white powder, which will give stuctural strength the sheets but they may toughen the mixture if above a certain proportion.

Next comes the tricky part, of forming sheets about which I have no idea. I would guess chilling, and rolling out and shaping these: perhaps with a sushi mat and silicone baking sheet? Would they be steamed after this step or dry cooked or pan cooked with a water-oil spray?

One would suppose the initial amount and types of fat [liquid crystal/membrane structure] of the initial mixture, plus the matrix stucture of the emulsion with regard to its fluidity and protein mix, and beginning and end temperatures while grinding [much like temperature control while mixing bread dough in industrial machines] would have some effects on the final results.

I have no experience of  Yan-pi; am merely re-constructing a logical chain, if that is of any help to you.

View Post


thanks for the details, much appreciated!
The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#79 dmreed

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 06:31 PM

another maybe unknown ingredient back in the early days???

in "Chinese Cookery in the Home Kitchen" editted by Jessie Louise Nolton copyrighted 1911 (available for free download), she describes Chinese Potatoes (yes, potatoes!) as:

"A small Chinese vegetable which is the root or tuber of a water plant. The flavor is similar to sugar cane when raw. The chief charm about this vegetable when used in the different foods is, that it retains its crispness when cooked, and furnishes a distinctly delicate addition to any dish in which it enters.

"Chinese potatoes should be peeled and sliced thin. Their keeping qualities are not as good as of ordinary potatoes and they do not retain their flavor for a great length of time."

this sounds like water chestnuts to me!

BTW the book is an interesting read and is very heavy on various versions of "Chop Sooy"!
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#80 liuzhou

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 06:54 PM

"Chinese Cookery in the Home Kitchen" editted by Jessie Louise Nolton copyrighted 1911 (available for free download)


and the link is here.

#81 dmreed

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 07:35 PM

"Chinese Cookery in the Home Kitchen" editted by Jessie Louise Nolton copyrighted 1911 (available for free download)


and the link is here.

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thanks, I should have provided the link :>(
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#82 udscbt

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 11:13 PM

Hello,

I would like to make Yan-Kit So/Martin's "Red-in-Snow Soup with Pork" but I have not found the main ingredient. It would help probably if I knew how "red-in-snow" is written in Chinese. Can someone help me? If I can't find it, is there a substitute, for example can I use Sichuan preserved vegetable?

Thanks for any help.

#83 udscbt

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 12:09 AM

Hello,

And yet another ingredient question prompted by the same book, Jacqueline M. Newman's "Cooking From China's Fujian Province" as dmreed's question.

There are a number of recipes (14 in the index) which refer to "rice wine lees". It is apparently a key ingredient in Fujian cooking but it is new to me.

Has anybody used this in his/her cooking? What does it add to a dish: color surely but what about taste or texture? How does one find this ingredient? What is it called in Chinese?

Thanks for any help.

Edited by udscbt, 19 August 2009 - 12:10 AM.


#84 v. gautam

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 11:32 AM

I believe red-in-snow may be a type of radish or crucifer. Red wine lees question is answered in the fu-ru/fermented bean curd thread.

#85 Ben Hong

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 09:53 AM

"Red in snow" is indeed made from a cruciferous plant, ie: a cabbage type similar to bok choy. It can usually be found in cans, preserved and pickled, and chopped up.

A huge nod to V. Gautam, again. :cool:

#86 dmreed

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 05:06 AM

Re: pork surimi, meat with fat homogenized [emulsified] with crushed ice in a food processor will make a base [the same process used to create texture for hot dogs, a pork, beef, turkey or chicken surimi]. Then you may choose to add quantities of flour and seasonings to your desire. You may experiment with egg white powder, which will give stuctural strength the sheets but they may toughen the mixture if above a certain proportion.

Next comes the tricky part, of forming sheets about which I have no idea. I would guess chilling, and rolling out and shaping these: perhaps with a sushi mat and silicone baking sheet? Would they be steamed after this step or dry cooked or pan cooked with a water-oil spray?

One would suppose the initial amount and types of fat [liquid crystal/membrane structure] of the initial mixture, plus the matrix stucture of the emulsion with regard to its fluidity and protein mix, and beginning and end temperatures while grinding [much like temperature control while mixing bread dough in industrial machines] would have some effects on the final results.

I have no experience of  Yan-pi; am merely re-constructing a logical chain, if that is of any help to you.

View Post


thanks for the details, much appreciated!

View Post


I am still looking for actual recipes for "swallow skin" or for references in books or for online mail-order sources...as usual, any help would be greatly appreciated.
The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

#87 Liveitloud

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 04:36 AM

Thanks for this thread it has answered several questions I have about products. Has anyone cooked with bulldog sauce? I think it's called tankatsu. I make a noodle dish that finishes with this sauce and it's flavors are so deep and beautiful.

#88 prasantrin

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 04:39 AM

Tonkatsu sauce is Japanese, not Chinese.

#89 OliverB

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 02:03 PM

this thread is probably going to be one of the most useful things to me on eGullet, if not the internet! Thanks for starting this, we just got a new Ranch 99 and a Fish something or other is going to open up soon. I find myself in front of 35787 different kinds of (insert name)sauces and have no clue what to get - usually just buy the more expensive stuff hoping it's "better", so this is going to be really really helpful!

Thanks!

Oliver
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#90 David A. Goldfarb

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 05:37 PM

An interesting new ingredient I found recently at the Asian market is Roxy 100% Cold Pressed Pure Peanut Oil, which I looked for and didn't find on the distributor's website, www.roxytrading.com, so perhaps it is a new product for them. It doesn't say that it is made elsewhere, so it is possible that it is manufactured in the US. I actually bought it about a week ago and opened the bottle this evening to discover the very vivid and pleasant aroma of PEANUTS, which seems absent from the peanut oil one gets at the supermarket. I think it was around $13 for a 64 oz. plastic bottle.





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