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Chocolate Truffles

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69 replies to this topic

#31 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 06:01 AM

Sidewalls formed when creating the outer shell in a molded chocolate. 

This woman, a jewelry maker, has an event of over 100. 

What kind of mold are you talking about making?  Would it hold up to multi-use chocolate production and assist the shine of tempered chocolate?

What about a custom metal cutter to cut chocolate from painted acetate?  That would be ideal to have an applique tile in her logo form.  Then it could be attached somewhat tilted on a round mold or elongated egg mold.  Perhaps a flat caraque with the logo slanted.  hmmmm, would it be cool or lame?

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Here is the link to the gelatin recipe for molding.

You will get nice shine depending on the smoothness of the item being duplicated, but I don't think it would hold up to 100 moldings (I might be wrong).

Essentially what you do is put some gelatin mixture in a container, place the object to be duplicated in it, cover with more gelatin, shake to remove bubbles. When solid, cut in half to release object, then mold chocolate in the halves. If you were trying to make a chocolate bar mold you could place your item face down in the gelatin, shake to remove bubbles, pull it out carefully when solid then use like a bar mold.

I like the idea of a metal cutter, the one thing I learned early, make sure you get it made backwards. You could paint your acetate, spread on the chocolate, punch with the cutter while still soft, and bend into a shape so that when you later release it it's not just a flat. Might make it easier to put on your rounded or egg shaped mold.

I had a rubber stamp made up with a logo backwards, painted it with coloured coco butter, stamped it onto acetate, then used the acetate in the bottom of a magnetic mold. A stencil might work better though to get the thickness and intensity of coloured cocoa butter on your acetate.

This afternoon I'm heading up to 'Coco Chocolates', a business started by one of my students, and we are going to talk to a potter who wants to explore the possibilites of making a clay mold to use for molding chocolate bars for her event. I'll let you know what we come up with.

#32 ruthie jewell

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 07:42 PM

Excellent information, thank you. I love the rubber stamp idea-ingenius! I really want to try the gelatin mold now. I'll be in touch.

Edited by ruthie jewell, 27 June 2006 - 07:47 PM.


#33 David J.

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 08:17 PM

Some great links, thanks.  I just called Chef Rubber in Vegas to see about having a polycarbonate mold made for a client's logo; whoa the price!  So I inquired about possibly doing a silcone cavity mold.  Can I make a sidewall in the mold or would they require dipping?  How about having a cutter made of her logo and doing some bright appliques from transfers on a truffle?

Suggestions and ideas welcome.

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I have both the Silicone Plastique and the CopyFlexTMLiquid Silicone from Culinart, Inc. I have been using it to make stencils for molds rather than molds themselves so far, but it is easy to work with. If you have a positive of the logo it would be a snap to make a mold that will stand up to repeated use.

http://www.culinart.net/silicone.html

#34 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 08:17 PM

Excellent information, thank you.  I love the rubber stamp idea-ingenius!  I really want to try the gelatin mold now.  I'll be in touch.

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Ruthie,
The one problem I had with the rubber stamps was getting the image intense enough. I suspect if you add some white to the colour it will make it more opaque, or try the stencil.

#35 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 08:19 PM

Some great links, thanks.  I just called Chef Rubber in Vegas to see about having a polycarbonate mold made for a client's logo; whoa the price!  So I inquired about possibly doing a silcone cavity mold.  Can I make a sidewall in the mold or would they require dipping?  How about having a cutter made of her logo and doing some bright appliques from transfers on a truffle?

Suggestions and ideas welcome.

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I have both the Silicone Plastique and the CopyFlexTMLiquid Silicone from Culinart, Inc. I have been using it to make stencils for molds rather than molds themselves so far, but it is easy to work with. If you have a positive of the logo it would be a snap to make a mold that will stand up to repeated use.

http://www.culinart.net/silicone.html

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That looks neat, seems to be food safe too. I'll have to get me some.

#36 Desiderio

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 10:50 PM

Yes definatly need to get some to play with :laugh: Thank you for the link )
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#37 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 04:40 AM

Some great links, thanks.  I just called Chef Rubber in Vegas to see about having a polycarbonate mold made for a client's logo; whoa the price!  So I inquired about possibly doing a silcone cavity mold.  Can I make a sidewall in the mold or would they require dipping?  How about having a cutter made of her logo and doing some bright appliques from transfers on a truffle?

Suggestions and ideas welcome.

View Post


I have both the Silicone Plastique and the CopyFlexTMLiquid Silicone from Culinart, Inc. I have been using it to make stencils for molds rather than molds themselves so far, but it is easy to work with. If you have a positive of the logo it would be a snap to make a mold that will stand up to repeated use.

http://www.culinart.net/silicone.html

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We seem a bit off the topic of truffles, however I picked up some Smooth-sil 940, a liquid food safe silicone from the Smooth-On company. I'll play with it while I'm in Manitoulin in the next 2 weeks and report back. I also ordered some of the Silicone Plastique to play with but It will take a couple of weeks to arrive.

#38 Kerry Beal

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 05:53 PM

I made a mold with the smooth-sil 940. I've posted the results in Confections! What did we make.

#39 jsmeeker

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 03:43 PM

I have a very generic question about chocolate truffles.

Is there a standard ratio of chocolate to cream? If I have a hunk of chocolate that weighs x, how much cream do I need. I'm looking to do simple hand rolled truffles that will be rolled/coated in cocoa powder.

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#40 Kerry Beal

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 03:48 PM

I have a very generic question about chocolate truffles.

Is there a standard ratio of  chocolate to cream?  If I have a hunk of chocolate that weighs x, how much cream do I need. I'm looking to do simple hand rolled truffles that will be rolled/coated in cocoa powder.

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About 4:1 chocolate to cream for dark chocolate.

#41 jsmeeker

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 09:24 PM

I have a very generic question about chocolate truffles.

Is there a standard ratio of  chocolate to cream?  If I have a hunk of chocolate that weighs x, how much cream do I need. I'm looking to do simple hand rolled truffles that will be rolled/coated in cocoa powder.

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About 4:1 chocolate to cream for dark chocolate.

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Thanks. I have a 10 ounce chunk of Callebaut 635. Thank makes for 2.5 ounces of cream. I'll give it a try.

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#42 tammylc

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 09:38 AM

4:1 chocolate to cream for dark chocolate would be way too stiff, IMO. I would recommend a 2:1 ratio.

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#43 ejw50

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Posted 29 January 2009 - 06:21 AM

4:1 chocolate to cream for dark chocolate would be way too stiff, IMO. I would recommend a 2:1 ratio.

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I also think 2:1 is the classic for the centers. If yuo're going to eat them right away
you can go down to 1.6:1.

Edited by ejw50, 29 January 2009 - 06:21 AM.


#44 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 January 2009 - 06:26 AM

My error was probably in talking about just the cream - there is also the butter, the booze, the glucose!

Edited by Kerry Beal, 29 January 2009 - 06:27 AM.


#45 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 04:09 PM

Suddenly I am having a problem with my dipped truffles. Some of the shells are cracking and some have little ribbons of ganache leaking out. We are trying everything we know to correct this but nothing is working so far. We are letting them rest after rolling them, doing a thin pre-dip, then doing the final fork dip. The storage room is kept at 62 degrees, My couverture is Callebaut. We are tempering it in a "Perfect" machine. Any suggestions? Please?

#46 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 04:34 PM

Try chilling the truffle balls before dipping - this often works for me when I get leaky dipped truffles.
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#47 Kerry Beal

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 04:47 PM

Actually I find it worse if I chill the centers - they expand as they warm and the chocolate contracts as it cools worsening the 'worms'. Have you made any changes in your formula? Has the room always been that cool or was it previously warmer?

#48 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 06:54 PM

We haven't changed anything. The temperature has been constant. We let the centers come to room temperature before dipping. The workroom is kept at 68 degrees. (Sorry I left that out.) Controlling humidity is a challenge but it has been staying at about 54%, not ideal but not too far off. The formula hasn't changed in years. I even buy the same brand of butter and cream, not only the same percentages.

#49 Kerry Beal

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 04:25 AM

Any change in the formulation of the Callebaut you are using?

#50 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 11:30 PM

The worst leaking occured with the sugarfree truffles. But the cracking was worst with the Callebaut 811. I will try to call them to see if there has been any change in formulation. Thank you for helping.

#51 Kerry Beal

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 04:32 AM

If your recipe will allow - add a bit of milk chocolate to your 811 for dipping and see if that helps.

#52 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 02:03 PM

When you suggest a bit, what proportions do you mean? I have been using a 44 pound warmer for the 811. It has been oour workhorse chocolate.

#53 Kerry Beal

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 02:37 PM

When you suggest a bit, what proportions do you mean? I have been using a 44 pound warmer for the 811. It has been oour workhorse chocolate.

Maybe about 5 to 10 % - but I'd probably do a little testing first - smaller quantities to see if it helps.

#54 gap

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 05:03 PM

Alternatively, is your warmer still keeping the chocolate at the same temperature? Maybe check it with a thermometer. In my experience, having chocolate at the higher end of the "holding" temperature range will make for a better coating on curved surfaces. Maybe your machinery is the cuplrit and is no-longer holding to the same temperature it once was?

Edited by gap, 07 June 2011 - 05:03 PM.


#55 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 10:24 PM

Thank you for the suggestions. I hadn't thought about raising the temperature but it is worth a try. My warmer is usually pretty dependable; sometimes we keep the thermometer handy for testing. But it is worth a try.

Kerry, would some additional cocoa butter help? I feel a little queasy about throwing in some of the milk chocolate. I'm areaid it will alter the flavor.

#56 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 04:11 AM

Kerry, would some additional cocoa butter help? I feel a little queasy about throwing in some of the milk chocolate. I'm areaid it will alter the flavor.

Nope - you want the milk fat to make the tempered chocolate more 'flexible' and less likely to crack. So probably not your best solution in this case.

#57 Mjx

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 04:35 AM



Kerry, would some additional cocoa butter help? I feel a little queasy about throwing in some of the milk chocolate. I'm areaid it will alter the flavor.

Nope - you want the milk fat to make the tempered chocolate more 'flexible' and less likely to crack. So probably not your best solution in this case.


Could a tiny amount of butter alone be used, then?

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#58 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 03:45 PM

Yup - clarified butter. But it makes the chocolate very soft.

#59 AnnieWilliams

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 04:14 PM

I was asked to make some chocolate truffles, which I have never done before since I'm not much of a candy maker. Sure, I have made ganache, but I have never gotten into the whole truffle thing. I am not looking at using molds, just the irregular chocolate "blobs" rolled in cocoa powder or whatever else. I was wondering if someone could provide a good base formula for the ganache. I am not sure what percentage of chocolate to use (I have been making ganache with 70% lately and it's been good), whether or not to add butter, and how much liqueur to use if you wanted to flavor them that way. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

#60 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 04:23 PM

Basic Dark Chocolate Truffle

(50 servings)


  • 150 grams whipping cream
  • 40 grams glucose
  • 350 grams dark chocolate
  • 65 grams butter - room temperature
  • 45 grams liquor of some sort


Melt chocolate and cool to about 30 to 32 degrees C. Heat cream and glucose to about 40 degrees C. Stir cream mixture into chocolate and stir until emulsified. Mix in butter until smooth and stir in liquor.






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