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DEMO: Macarons


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48 replies to this topic

#31 schneich

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Posted 31 December 2005 - 08:22 PM

thanks for a great demo, i have tried quite a few times to make these little suckers, but they were never as perfect as yours. i hope you recipe works out for me :-)

can you tell me something about how long they can be stored and if you can put em into a plasticbox, or is there a need to add some silica gel ??


cheers


t.
toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#32 schneich

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 01:23 PM

i do the macarons every second day or so, our customers love them. recently i found out that its possible to skip the 20 minute wait after piping, by blowing them dry with the hot air blower i use for chocolate work. i hover about 15 cm over them for just a few seconds, until they loose that "shine" and develop a skin. dont overdo it, or things will start to brown :-)


cheers

t.
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patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#33 LittleIsland

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 02:09 AM

Thank you schneich for resurrecting this thread! Been reading the other long macaron thread and doing searches for more tips but for whatever reason this thread never came up in my searches. This one has been VERY helpful!! (And so has your tip, not that I have a hot air blower but someone else mentioned the Italian meringue macarons dry very quickly)

#34 JohnRichardson

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 08:38 AM

I'm going to revive this thread. I made these yesterday since you can't buy a decent one in Chicago, at least not without buying them in bulk via special order. I used the calculations from upthread (500g TPT, processed and sifted, 250 g sugar, 187 g egg whites, and I added 30g cocoa to the dry ingredients and filled with a dark ganache made from 7 oz 71% valhrona, 2 1/2 tbs butter, and 7 fl. oz of cream)

The cocoa needed to be a better quality, or perhaps more of it, becuase the color wasn't the beautiful chocolate color, it had a grayish tinge to it. But other than that, and the fact that I think I needed to deflate just a bit more becuase the first few were very fluffy, these were pretty good. About 15 minutes at 325, and I found the batch on parchment was much better than the two batches on silpats, the silpat batches didn't quite stick, but required some care to release, the parchment batch was almost sliding around on the parchment. Texture wise, they were just about perfect: crispy, chewy, delicate.

Next time I'm going to make a template and shoot for 2" macs, these were about 2 3/4 to 3", which is a touch too big. And I'm going to process the dry ingredients longer, there were still some almond chunks, even after sifting... Maybe a finer sifter. But not bad for a 2nd attempt, my first batch was undercooked, irregular, and ugly. And since I made them without a stand mixer, I rememberd the meringue being a PITA. With a stand mixer, it's easy. :wub:

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#35 RuthWells

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 02:57 PM

I'm going to revive this thread.  I made these yesterday since you can't buy a decent one in Chicago, at least not without buying them in bulk via special order.  I used the calculations from upthread (500g TPT, processed and sifted, 250 g sugar, 187 g egg whites, and I added 30g cocoa to the dry ingredients and filled with a dark ganache made from 7 oz 71% valhrona, 2 1/2 tbs butter, and 7 fl. oz of cream)

The cocoa needed to be a better quality, or perhaps more of it, becuase the color wasn't the beautiful chocolate color, it had a grayish tinge to it.  But other than that, and the fact that I think I needed to deflate just a bit more becuase the first few were very fluffy, these were pretty good.  About 15 minutes at 325, and I found the batch on parchment was much better than the two batches on silpats, the silpat batches didn't quite stick, but required some care to release, the parchment batch was almost sliding around on the parchment.  Texture wise, they were just about perfect: crispy, chewy, delicate.

Next time I'm going to make a template and shoot for 2" macs, these were about 2 3/4 to 3", which is a touch too big.  And I'm going to process the dry ingredients longer, there were still some almond chunks, even after sifting...  Maybe a finer sifter.  But not bad for a 2nd attempt, my first batch was undercooked, irregular, and ugly.  And since I made them without a stand mixer, I rememberd the meringue being a PITA.  With a stand mixer, it's easy. :wub:

Posted Image

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Lookin' good! A very standard trick for improving the color of a chocolate mac is to add a few drops of red food color to the batter. Perks the brown right up.

Last week I asked my local market to order Bob's Red Mill almond flour for me, so I'll be mac-ing soon, too, I hope!

Edited by RuthWells, 02 December 2008 - 02:58 PM.


#36 JohnRichardson

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 07:44 AM

Lookin' good!  A very standard trick for improving the color of a chocolate mac is to add a few drops of red food color to the batter.  Perks the brown right up.

Last week I asked my local market to order Bob's Red Mill almond flour for me, so I'll be mac-ing soon, too, I hope!

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That is the flour that I used. It's a little coarser than would be ideal, I put the almond meal & powdered sugar into a food processor and hit it with 6-8 5 second pulses. Next time I'm going to do even more, and try a finer sifter, because it still came out a little chunky, and after the batter gets to the point where everything is incorporated, I'm goign to intentionally stir it a bit more, these don't have the right shine and weren't quite flat enough. But night and day over my last attempt, and they had feet and texture.

The food coloring idea is not a bad one, although I prefer not to add any. Just moving to a better cocoa would probably get me there, this was the hershey's "special dark" which was all I could find at the regular market where I bought all the ingredients except the almond flour, which I bought ahead of time at whole foods (I made these at a friend's house as my contribution to several different cookie types that we made). I wish hershey's still made their european style, which was actually quite good.

Once I have a bigger kitchen and a stand mixer (< 3 months) I'll try this again. I've made italian meringues and even buttercream before with a hand mixer but a stand mixer certainly makes it easier.

#37 RuthWells

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 01:50 PM

Thanks for the tip re: the almond meal -- I'll try whizzing it with the sugar, as well.

#38 afoodie

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 10:33 AM

thanks for a great demo, i have tried quite a few times to make these little suckers, but they were never as perfect as yours. i hope you recipe works out for me :-)

can you tell me something about how long they can be stored and if you can put em into a plasticbox, or is there a need to add some silica gel ??


cheers


t.

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I think silica gel will do no good for them, they will dry out.

#39 alanamoana

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:14 PM

thanks for a great demo, i have tried quite a few times to make these little suckers, but they were never as perfect as yours. i hope you recipe works out for me :-)

can you tell me something about how long they can be stored and if you can put em into a plasticbox, or is there a need to add some silica gel ??


cheers


t.

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i realize this was like three years ago, but i thought i'd respond: it's possible to freeze macs (unfilled) and then just defrost and fill. at least that's what they did at payard patisserie in nyc a couple of years ago.

#40 gap

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:21 PM

I've frozen them for up to two weeks filled and they're fine (post two weeks they become a little chewy). I actually think they're better after being frozen for three days. (I thaw for 24 hours in the fridge)

#41 JamericanDiva

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 10:31 PM

After doing countless hours of research on macarons, I finally decided to make some. Happy to say, I got lil' feet on my first attempt. Here's a picture. I got lazy to make the ganache and instead filled it with staight NUTELLA! I darn near needed an insulin shot! It was delicious though... only filled three with Nutella. Naked the others sit in a plastic tub until I settle upon a filling.
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Extra pictures are posted in a Facebook album:
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#42 gfron1

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 06:12 AM

Perfect tops - congrats! Awesome first attempt.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#43 bluechefk

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 02:16 PM

am re-re-resurrecting this thread as my copy of the pierre herme macaron book arrived just the other day, and i'm itching to make some! first i need to spend some quality time with Google Translator & figure out some of the recipes - i'm just dying to try the ketchup flavor :smile:

some quick questions:

* i've ordered some blanched fine almond powder from Mandelin - have heard that it's excellent for making macarons; anyone have personal experience with this brand? also, is it overkill to process this flour with the sugar a time or two? - it's meant to be quite fine, and i don't know if more is good in this case, or if it would be too much!

* i had planned to bake these at home, where i have only a conventional oven. PH uses convection - do you think this makes a major difference? if necessary, i can bake the macarons at work & use their ovens (drawback: i will have to share with the staff :hmmm: ). would the standard 'increase by 25 degrees' conversion from convection to conventional be the way to go?

and finally -

* PH calls for opening and closing the oven door rapidly 2x during baking - what is the purpose of that, anyone know?

kerry

#44 chezcherie

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 03:25 PM

some quick questions:

*  i've ordered some blanched fine almond powder from Mandelin - have heard that it's excellent for making macarons; anyone have personal experience with this brand? also, is it overkill to process this flour with the sugar a time or two? - it's meant to be quite fine, and i don't know if more is good in this case, or if it would be too much!

kerry

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i've used the mandelin almond paste and it is absolutely awesome. amazing almond flavor.
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#45 alanamoana

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 05:27 PM

am re-re-resurrecting this thread as my copy of the pierre herme macaron book arrived just the other day, and i'm itching to make some!  first i need to spend some quality time with Google Translator & figure out some of the recipes - i'm just dying to try the ketchup flavor  :smile:

some quick questions:

*  i've ordered some blanched fine almond powder from Mandelin - have heard that it's excellent for making macarons; anyone have personal experience with this brand? also, is it overkill to process this flour with the sugar a time or two? - it's meant to be quite fine, and i don't know if more is good in this case, or if it would be too much!

* i had planned to bake these at home, where i have only a conventional oven. PH uses convection - do you think this makes a major difference? if necessary, i can bake the macarons at work & use their ovens (drawback:  i will have to share with the staff  :hmmm: ). would the standard 'increase by 25 degrees' conversion from convection to conventional be the way to go?

and finally -

* PH calls for opening and closing the oven door rapidly 2x during baking - what is the purpose of that, anyone know?

kerry

View Post


i think overprocessing could result in undesired oiliness. but if you're processing with the sugar, it might be protected a bit. if the almond meal is very fine, i wouldn't worry about it. i might sift the tpt to get out any big bits of almonds.

i think the oven conversion would depend on if your home oven is calibrated or not. convection might be better because of the circulating DRY air. i think that's also the point of opening and closing the oven...to let out moisture.

i would also go with a lower temp rather than a higher temp...but that's just me :wink:

good luck and let us know how they turn out based on PH's recipe!

#46 lennyk

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 07:55 PM

macarons are indeed very temperature sensitive in the oven,
you should try different rack heights and figure out the best for your oven
it is a pain but worth the trouble

I used to do mine for 18mins in the middle 2 racks and rotate the sheets around 8mins otherwise the higher rack would be overcooked

I later found that using the topmost and second rack was fine and didn't even require rotating except that the ones on the edges might be overcooked but that was the only reason to rotate

#47 lamington

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 11:29 PM

There are lots of useful tips over in the main macaron thread in France: Cooking and Baking, here.
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#48 prairiegirl

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 07:25 PM

I find these really tricky to make. I botched the last batch...only by a little...I was close!! My kids gobbled them up in no time!

#49 tkerby

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 07:25 AM

Just tried this recipe and it was looking so good until the cooking.  I've ended up with the feet spreading too much and the shells being thin and completely hollow.  Cooked on a variety of surfaces, all steel baking sheets one with a silicon liner, one parchment and one a teflon sheet.  Oven temp was 150C and cooked for approx 12 minutes.  Any tips?