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Tanqueray Malacca


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46 replies to this topic

#1 jazzyjeff

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 12:12 PM

Hi there,

Great to find such a fantastic forum.

Just wondering if you could help me out. I have just managed to get hold of quite a few bottles of Tanqueray Malacca gin and wanted to find out more about the product.

I believe that it is triple distilled to 40% ABV to a recipe from 1839. I think it has a higher concentration of spicy botanicals than juniper (perhaps coriander?).

Other than that, my knowledge is pretty poor. I would be greatful for any other facts you may know about this and also what cocktails it works well in.

Many thanks

J

#2 M.X.Hassett

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 02:15 PM

I found this "This "good-gin-a- subtle, bad-gin-as-heavily-flavored" standard established, we must promptly chuck it out the window to come to grips with Tanqueray Malacca Gin. It is an unusual concoction." http://www.alcoholre...TS/malacca.html

According to this it looks likes you are sitting on some discontinued bottles
"THIS ITEM MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AND MAY REQUIRE SUBSTITUTION. IT IS NO LONGER BEING PRODUCED. WE HAVE LIMITED QUANTITIES STILL AVAILABLE IN THE USA." http://sendbeer.com/...eraymalacca.asp

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#3 Ktepi

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 02:38 PM

I haven't seen Malacca in at least a year, maybe two -- it was my gin of choice during its brief lifespan. I don't remember drinking it with anything but tonic or club soda -- I'm not much of a martini drinker, I hadn't yet embraced the Negroni, and I agree with the page there that says it doesn't mix with fruit juices as well as other gins do (although I usually added lime to my gin and tonics and didn't have a problem with it).

#4 scratchline

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 03:03 PM

Haven't seen that stuff in years. Got some when it came out and loved it. From Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails by Ted Haigh aka Dr. Cocktail:

Pink Gin

3 oz Plymouth Gin
6 goodly dashes Angostura

Shake in an iced cocktail shaker. Strain into a stemmed cocktail glass sans garnish.

"The only other brand that tastes right in a Pink Gin was Tanqueray Malacca--which adhered to an original 1839 gin formula, but in their infinite wisdom (heavy, HEAVY irony here) Tanqueray suspended its production. Plymouth and Malacca gins are the most valued in Doc's liquor cabinet, and I hope someone comes to their senses and produces the latter again."

You're a lucky camper. Sip safe.

#5 slkinsey

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 03:09 PM

Alas, Malacca is no longer being produced & can only be found among those of us who have secreted away a stash for the future. One of the more interesting products to come along. I was sad to see it go, and I know I'm not alone in that respect.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#6 Bill Miller

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 08:16 AM

When I tried it years ago it was promoted as the original Tanqueray. I found it not to my liking. Very different.
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#7 Alchemist

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 01:24 PM

I Just recivied a bottle of it from one of my favorite cocktail geeks. I have it stashed away from prying eyes, and thirsty tounges, till next summer. This way I have months to figure out what to do with this liquid gold. It's gotta be the paragon of simplicity. Pomagranate Gim Maybe.



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#8 bacchant036

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 06:17 AM

amusingly malacca (although the spellings quite different) means something fairly offensive in greek
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#9 Sneakeater

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 10:46 AM

And then of course there's Extra Heavy Malaga, which has its own meaning for Jewish wine fans.

Edited by Sneakeater, 28 December 2005 - 10:58 AM.


#10 freshherbs

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 03:08 PM

weirdly enough, it was targeted towards African-Americans when it came out.

It mixes beautifully with orange. should be beautiful in a fizz of some sort...thinking 1.5 oz mallaca, .75 oz OJ, 1.5 simple, egg white, seltzer and regan's orange to top it.

#11 Moto

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 06:56 PM

weirdly enough, it was targeted towards African-Americans when it came out. 

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Weirdly?

#12 cdh

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 07:03 PM

I still miss it. My last bottle is going very slowly.
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

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#13 freshherbs

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 07:27 AM

weirdly enough, it was targeted towards African-Americans when it came out. 

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Weirdly?

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weirdly, because i think it is weird when any product that can be enjoyed by all is decided by focus groups to be targeted at a single demographic.

#14 Jack Rose

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 08:05 AM

Malacca was great, distinct gin while is was produced - albeit not popular enough to warrant its continuance. Dr. Cocktail makes that reference with his Pink Gin (Gin and Bitters) recipe and I was too late in reading a couple of years back to find some. I was told that it is still available in the UK. Is there any truth to that?

It looks like the Tanqueray Sterling Vodka has either been discontinued or is really limited in scope of distribution.

The African-American mention was valid for I remember print ads although I cannot imagine what the rationale was. I asked some black friends and found that Tanqueray has always been popular within their demographic - usually mixed with grapefruit juice.

#15 gethin

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 10:16 AM

I was told that it is still available in the UK.  Is there any truth to that?

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unfortunately not.

gethin

#16 Moto

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 08:58 PM

It looks like the Tanqueray Sterling Vodka has either been discontinued or is really limited in scope of distribution.

The African-American mention was valid for I remember print ads although I cannot imagine what the rationale was.  I asked some black friends and found that Tanqueray has always been popular within their demographic - usually mixed with grapefruit juice.

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Exactly, Tanqueray, just like cognac has been popular in the African American community for years thus the targeting makes sense. Just as most liquors are targeted towards a demographic, whether sex, age, race or geography.

Tanqueray enjoyed with either grapefruit or tonic, I think I will pour one now. Preferably the regualr(bitter) grapefruit juice not that sweet stuff(ruby red). Tanqueray Sterling vodka is still available in the Carolinas.

#17 TBoner

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 08:40 PM

Bumping this because I found some Malacca this week. I'll be making pink gins with it, of course, and trying it out in G&T and martinis. But what other recommendations do you folks have to make this stuff really sing?

I'm thinking some cocktails, particularly with citrus juice, such as Aviations and Last Words may be the wrong answer based on what I've read. I see Alchemist's mention of Pomegranate gin. How'd that go over? I'm looking for input to maximize my enjoyment of the stash I found.
Tim

#18 KatieLoeb

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 08:57 PM

I'll be making pink gins with it, of course...


Pink gin? What do you mean by this?

There used to be a bottle of Pink Diamond Gin behind the bar at my last gig, and it was hideous stuff. Smelled like a grandmothers drawing room that hadn't had the windows opened in three decades. :raz:

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#19 TallDrinkOfWater

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 09:43 PM

Pink gin?  What do you mean by this?

Pink Gin background and recipe here.

Angostura bitters and gin in a glass. Nothing could be simpler. Make it with something zingy [Junipero, etc.] for a real kick.
-Dayne aka TallDrinkOfWater

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#20 KatieLoeb

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 10:01 PM

Thank you Dayne! I hadn't seen or heard of that one before. I'll have to try it. Sounds quite refreshing.

Katie M. Loeb
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#21 slkinsey

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 05:21 AM

Bumping this because I found some Malacca this week. I'll be making pink gins with it, of course, and trying it out in G&T and martinis.

Gin & Tonics with Malacca?! That's a real waste of this gin. Once it's gone, there won't be any more to be had. Why not make it with something where you can really taste the gin?
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#22 TBoner

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 05:51 AM

Bumping this because I found some Malacca this week. I'll be making pink gins with it, of course, and trying it out in G&T and martinis.

Gin & Tonics with Malacca?! That's a real waste of this gin. Once it's gone, there won't be any more to be had. Why not make it with something where you can really taste the gin?

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So, any suggestions to go with the chastisement?
Tim

#23 slkinsey

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 06:39 AM

Pink Gins and Martinis are just right, of course. My suggestion is that you hoard the bottle of Malacca and use it only in drinks like these that highlight its unique qualities. I've got around a half-bottle left myself, and wouldn't use it for anything but Martinis.

This is not to say that it wouldn't be good in a G&T. In fact, it's more emphatic flavors work very well with tonic water. So, if Tanqueray were still making Malacca I'd certainly suggest trying it with tonic water if you are a G&T lover. But considering that you may never come across another bottle of Malacca again, using it in drinks that don't highlight its "specialness" seems like a shame.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#24 TBoner

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 07:09 AM

slkinsey,

Thanks for the reply. I actually found 4 bottles of Malacca, so I think I'll give a G&T a go at least once. But I understand what you were getting at. Most of my gin of any stripe goes into martinis, though I enjoy a variety of gin-based cocktails. I really just threw the G&T suggestion in there because I figured the tonic water wouldn't overpower the flavor of the gin.

I'll definitely use the stuff sparingly, and report back on my results.

Thanks again.
Tim

#25 slkinsey

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 07:28 AM

FOr an optimal experience, see if you can get ahold of one of the boutique tonics like Fever Tree Tonic or Q Tonic. These have a more complex flavor, and won't overwhelm with sweetness.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#26 Moto

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 06:04 PM

Pink gin?  What do you mean by this?

Pink Gin background and recipe here.

Angostura bitters and gin in a glass. Nothing could be simpler. Make it with something zingy [Junipero, etc.] for a real kick.

View Post

I am glad to know one of my favs has a name. For the past 18 months(since acquiring my first bottle of angustora bitters I have been enjoying this drink often with a twist of lime. I really think it works well for lower proof gins such as plymouth

#27 eje

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 02:07 PM

Lucky man, to find some bottles of Malacca!

A couple people I trust to know what they are talking about, recommend Malacca as a substitute for Old Tom Gin, as long as you add a dash of simple.

One of my favorite recent cocktail discoveries from the Savoy Cocktail Book is the Casino Cocktail. It calls for Old Tom Gin. Really, it's good with just about any decent ballsy gin, so it might be worth a try with the Malacca:

Casino Cocktail

2 Dashes Maraschino (Luxardo)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters (generous couple splashes Regan's Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Lemon Juice (Juice 1/8 lemon)
1 Glass Old Tom Gin (2 oz Junipero Gin and a dash simple)

Stir well and add cherry.


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#28 Alchemist

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 08:12 PM

That is a rather strange version. The rule (and of course there are exceptions) is if a recipe calls for lemon of lime juice it is shaken.

My version

2 oz. gin (Tanq/Beef/Bombay Dry)
.75 oz lemon
.50 oz Luxardo Mara
.25 oz simple (1x1)
3 dash orange bitters (1x1 Regans, Fees with some essential orange oil added)

SSU, lemon twist if you want a little extra ooomph.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#29 eje

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 10:14 PM

The measures and ingredients suggest to me that that the Casino Cocktail is one of the pre-prohibition recipes in the Savoy Cocktail Book.

It's not from Jerry Thomas, that I know of.

Unfortunately, my pre-prohibition library isn't deep enough for me to be able tell you where else it might come from.
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#30 Splificator

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 08:40 AM

The measures and ingredients suggest to me that that the Casino Cocktail is one of the pre-prohibition  recipes in the Savoy Cocktail Book. 

It's not from Jerry Thomas, that I know of. 

Unfortunately, my pre-prohibition library isn't deep enough for me to be able tell you where else it might come from.

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The Casino Cocktail is as far as I know a New York drink of the 1890s-1900s, almost certainly named after the famous Casino theater, on Broadway and (if I recall correctly) 36th St. The Casino had a well-regarded bar and a roof garden, so the drink may have been the house cocktail there.

This drink is one of the many that Craddock cribbed from Hugo Ensslin's 1916 Recipes for Mixed Drinks (another being the Aviation, although minus the creme de violette). Ensslin's formula is identical. I seem to recall an earlier appearance of the drink than in Ensslin's book; I'll have a look when I get a chance.
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