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Chocolate Tempering Machines

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#151 lapin d'or

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 10:28 AM

In addition to looking at the equipment available from Vantage House you might also look at keylink and the home chocolate factory.

I bought both my Mol d'Art melters from HB ingredients but their equipment range is quite limited.

I started with the 3kg (round bowl) Mol d'Art melter and later bought the larger one to make working with larger figure moulds more practical. They hold temper well but you need to manage the way the chocolate can gradually thicken up, so as mentioned above, use a heat gun regularly to keep it fluid.

My biggest problem with working from a home kitchen in the England (Devon) is managing the room temperature and the especially the humidity.

I hope that helps,

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#152 Edward J

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 07:22 PM

My thoughts on this are almost the same as Chris's--you'd be better off with a larger melter.

I have the small rev. machine, probably one of the first (back then it was chocovision)and it works good. O.T.O.H. it is too small to cast shells for bon-bons, too small to dip anything more than a dozen or two of truffles.

The mol'dart's are robust melters and are quite good, big enough to cast a few trays of bon-bons, and accurate enough to hold their temperature for a few hours.

Currently I have two 20 kg water bath type melters at work, and am quite happy with them.

Here's where you have to bit the bullet. If you do get a fully automatic temperer without first learning to temper by hand, you will be in for a "surprise" in a year from now if the machine breaks down or whatever. With a melter you temper by hand, and gain the knowledge and experience needed.

#153 AnythingButPlainChocolate

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 11:50 PM

Thanks for the advice all, you've convinced me, melters are the way to go as I can continue to use them in the future if/when I expand.

I'm glad I posted!

And especially thanks lapin, it's nice to have some regional-specific advice. The heat in my place isn't a problem with 3 foot thick stone walls (I live in an 1800's school house) but the humidity is worth noting. I was going to buy a de-humidifyer for the room and a wine chiller with de-humidifying salts to store the chocolate in for that very reason.
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#154 confiseur

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 07:06 AM

A friend of mine will probably be willing to sell his Rev 2 .. still in original packaging, never been used and sat in his store room for the last 2 years...at a very reasonable price indeed if you are interested.

#155 chocoera

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 07:29 PM

hey chocolate lovers!
so....i'm going to bite the bullet and buy a tempering unit for christmas season. currently we use 3 table top mol d' arts, 2: 5 lbs and 1: 10 lb. the unit i'd like would be a 10 lb at minimum, if i could go up a little more i would, but not sure how big they get before they get "massive"

anyone have thoughts on where to buy a unit and what brand works best for a professional kitchen? we currently temper every day and sometimes several times a day depending on production schedule, so i'd need one that's pretty reliable and keeps a good temper.


thanks for thinking about this!!
PS- if someone has one they don't need because they are upgrading in size, let me know!

#156 Kerry Beal

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 07:35 PM

Are you thinking you want a unit that you can attach an enrober to eventually?

#157 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 09:27 PM

What is your budget?

#158 Edward J

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 11:14 PM

Tabletop Mol d'arts are fine but they are melters,not tempering machines.

Both Kelly and I are thinking tempering units, as in, press the button and walk away, and 20 minutes later, the couverture is tempered. These are usually coupled with an enrobing device.

I am still small volume,top capacity per day for me is 500 bon-bons, 240 50gr bars, and maybe a couple dozen hollow molded figures. For this,I have 2 large melters from D & R, and one cheap-o 5kg melter from Martillato for my white couverture. The D&R melters take a full size deep hotel-pan, I think 20 kg capapcity. I have one for dark, and one for milk. I also have the electric wheel, which usually sits in the dark, but sometimes I have an "all-day milk day" and swap the wheel into the milk melter. All temperature changes on the melters and tempering is done by me, manually. The units are bomb-proof, but as simple as a regular soup warmer. I work alone, and also produce pastries and high teas during the day as well.

Mol d'art makes a full line of s/s behemoths, from 40 kg and all the way up to institutional. Savvy makes a line of tempering and enrobing machines as well. Both of these companies are European, and nothing will be under 15 thousand. The units are well constructed, beautifull, really; but are complicated and computerized, and regular kitchen equipment repair guys will have no clue as how to service/repair them.

D & R (design and realization) is located in Montreal, and is geared towards the smaller artisan producer.

Hope this helps,

#159 Chocolot

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 06:25 AM

I have a Hilliard 80# per day machine that I have used for 30 years and love it. Very dependable and easy to use. Downsides--harder to do molding out of it and the heat source is light bulbs and they are going to be harder to find. It is good for hand-dipping. I also have 3- 50# Savage that I also love. Very simple to use, almost a set it and forget it. They are designed to have water plumbed into the water jacket for quick temperature changes, but I just use them as a closed system. Very easy to mold with--open the spigot and the chocolate pours into your molds. Tap the excess back into the top of the melter. I can hold temper for several days in these. I also have a Perfect wheel temperer with my enrober. It works, but I still prefer the Savage for tempering.

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#160 chocoera

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:40 AM

Are you thinking you want a unit that you can attach an enrober to eventually?



i'm sure that would be smart to consider, not sure on how much room i might need for that? i'd look at both options :)

#161 chocoera

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:44 AM

Tabletop Mol d'arts are fine but they are melters,not tempering machines.

Both Kelly and I are thinking tempering units, as in, press the button and walk away, and 20 minutes later, the couverture is tempered. These are usually coupled with an enrobing device.

I am still small volume,top capacity per day for me is 500 bon-bons, 240 50gr bars, and maybe a couple dozen hollow molded figures. For this,I have 2 large melters from D & R, and one cheap-o 5kg melter from Martillato for my white couverture. The D&R melters take a full size deep hotel-pan, I think 20 kg capapcity. I have one for dark, and one for milk. I also have the electric wheel, which usually sits in the dark, but sometimes I have an "all-day milk day" and swap the wheel into the milk melter. All temperature changes on the melters and tempering is done by me, manually. The units are bomb-proof, but as simple as a regular soup warmer. I work alone, and also produce pastries and high teas during the day as well.

Mol d'art makes a full line of s/s behemoths, from 40 kg and all the way up to institutional. Savvy makes a line of tempering and enrobing machines as well. Both of these companies are European, and nothing will be under 15 thousand. The units are well constructed, beautifull, really; but are complicated and computerized, and regular kitchen equipment repair guys will have no clue as how to service/repair them.

D & R (design and realization) is located in Montreal, and is geared towards the smaller artisan producer.

Hope this helps,



hi edward,
yes we temper by hand currently and would like to look into an actual machine. i am also small volume right now and will look into D&R (was unfamiliar this company existed) :P
so how exactly does this wheel thing work that you're talking about? do you temper by seed method and manual aggitation? or how do you temper with your melter and wheel? would love to learn more and will check out the D&R site :)

#162 chocoera

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:15 AM

I have a Hilliard 80# per day machine that I have used for 30 years and love it. Very dependable and easy to use. Downsides--harder to do molding out of it and the heat source is light bulbs and they are going to be harder to find. It is good for hand-dipping. I also have 3- 50# Savage that I also love. Very simple to use, almost a set it and forget it. They are designed to have water plumbed into the water jacket for quick temperature changes, but I just use them as a closed system. Very easy to mold with--open the spigot and the chocolate pours into your molds. Tap the excess back into the top of the melter. I can hold temper for several days in these. I also have a Perfect wheel temperer with my enrober. It works, but I still prefer the Savage for tempering.



the savage sounds close to what i'm looking for...not sure if i'd dig the idea of light bulbs :S plus being in algona, we don't have much of anything here in terms of if something breaks or needs replacing. thanks ruth!

#163 chocoera

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:17 AM

What is your budget?



well. not sure. i've never been one for machines because i'm a control freak and figure i temper best manually and if it screws up, its on me, and i can change me...if a machine screws up...then what do you do? but i know i need to upgrade so thinking about a machine that is quality ;) at the same time we just bought our building and renovated my space and brad's space, so $ is short. so i figure i can try a machine and then upgrade later? that long story being said, i figure i could convince brad to spend $2,000-5,000 now, and maybe upgrade later? will that get me anything? :P

#164 Edward J

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 04:19 PM

www.dr.ca

I temper by seed method.
The wheel is a separate unit and sits in the tub. It just spins around and at the top there is a comb and a chute. Couverture flows out of the chute and back into the tub. Not a bad set up for smaller places, and the units are pretty much bomb-proof.

#165 Baylee Chocolate Lady

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 10:35 PM

The termpering machine will save you time. We have to multi-task: while the machine is heating or cooling, we can work on a ganache or make caramel or whatever. I have the feeling that an automatic machine would drive you nuts. My trusty old ACMC's have to be monitored and we add seed, but they are usually dependable. Too small for your needs probably.When I started out, that was all I had and I turned out a lot of product. I left seed behind the baffle and let it melt while I worked. They are just 6 pound machines but I used 3- to 40 pounds a day for dipping. And I felt in control. Have you been to any of the trade shows? There are a lot of choices displayed, especially at the Philly Shows and, I think, the RCI meetings. When you are out of town, you can ask chocolatiers what they use. I have gotten to see a number of kitchens and lots of equpment that way. Folks seem very generous with their time and informaton as long as I am away from my home turf. Sometimes there are ads on the RCI site or The Chocolate Life site. Happy hunting.

#166 Lior

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 09:38 AM

I even smaller than you guys here. Much. I use 2 6kg mol d'art melters, and 2 X3210 "tempering" machings from chocovision. Works perfectly for me in a variety of combinations. I can keep melted choc in the melter-not tempered and as I use tempered choc from the machine, I replacce whatever I use with untempered from the melter and then add choc to the melter and this can go on for eternity!!!

#167 chocoera

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 04:17 PM

I even smaller than you guys here. Much. I use 2 6kg mol d'art melters, and 2 X3210 "tempering" machings from chocovision. Works perfectly for me in a variety of combinations. I can keep melted choc in the melter-not tempered and as I use tempered choc from the machine, I replacce whatever I use with untempered from the melter and then add choc to the melter and this can go on for eternity!!!


do you add the untempered behind the baffle or right into the tempered chocolate? do you have to be careful with your ratios?

#168 Mjx

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 07:32 AM

What reliable, small temperers are on the market today? This would be for home use, so even a tiny capcity should be fine. We're in the EU, so European brands are definitely an option.

 

Thanks!


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#169 Mjx

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 12:19 PM

The table-top temperers look about right, capacity-wise, and several reliable companies make these units, but are they reliable machines?


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#170 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 07:11 PM

I know I hear about a lot of the Revolation machines requiring repair.  Fine if you are in NA but would be more challenging overseas.  I suspect if you are prepared to manually temper that you might find a Mold'art 3 kg unit suitable.



#171 Mjx

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:35 AM

Thanks Kerry! Any idea whether melting as little as 500g/1lb would be feasible in these? I don't seen any mention of this in the specs (but I may have missed it).

 

The Mol d'Art units are described as 'melters', 'designed for the melting and tempering of smaller volumes of couverture', and now I'm a bit confused: What does a temperer need to have that a melter doesn't? Does this amount to anything more than finer and more accurate control of the melting temperature?


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#172 pastrygirl

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 06:15 PM

Thanks Kerry! Any idea whether melting as little as 500g/1lb would be feasible in these? I don't seen any mention of this in the specs (but I may have missed it).
 
The Mol d'Art units are described as 'melters', 'designed for the melting and tempering of smaller volumes of couverture', and now I'm a bit confused: What does a temperer need to have that a melter doesn't? Does this amount to anything more than finer and more accurate control of the melting temperature?


I have the 6kg, which I don't bother with unless I am filling a lot of molds and need at least 2kg, usually 3 or 4. Looks like the 3kg is bowl shaped, so would be better for smaller amounts.

A temperer stirs the chocolate, a melter only melts it and holds it at your desired temp. With a melter you still have to hand temper, that is add seed chocolate and stir and check it for temper. Once your chocolate is where you want it, set the melter at the desired temp and it will keep it there while you're working with it. Good if you are hand-dipping or when you need the chocolate to stay workable for a while. If you're just going to temper 500g at a time and use it all for a bark, I wouldn't bother.

#173 Mjx

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 09:28 AM

I have the 6kg, which I don't bother with unless I am filling a lot of molds and need at least 2kg, usually 3 or 4. Looks like the 3kg is bowl shaped, so would be better for smaller amounts.

A temperer stirs the chocolate, a melter only melts it and holds it at your desired temp. With a melter you still have to hand temper, that is add seed chocolate and stir and check it for temper. Once your chocolate is where you want it, set the melter at the desired temp and it will keep it there while you're working with it. Good if you are hand-dipping or when you need the chocolate to stay workable for a while. If you're just going to temper 500g at a time and use it all for a bark, I wouldn't bother.

 
Thanks!
 
I'm fine with doing a lot of this by hand, but my boyfriend is experiencing a post-chocolate-workshop fever that is compounding his fondness for machinery in general. I'm trying to sort of contain the situation (I saw him gazing fondly at industrial size temperers online) by attempting to track down a reliable temperer (ideally) or melter (alternatively) with the smallest footprint and capacity available.
 
Would a melter be a decent choice for small batches of moulded chocolates, say a few dozen at a go?
 
The temperer (or melter) would be used primarily for making moulded chocolates, and although my boyfriend is an avid producer of chocolates, he doesn't eat that many, and virtually everyone I know is on a diet, which means either throwing away chocolates (kind of sad) or my taking up the slack (pleasant, but I'm short, and prefer to remain taller than I am wide), and I'm pretty sure that if the minimum a temperer would work with was 2kg, that's exactly how much would be put in, and I don't even want to think about how many chocolates that would yield.

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#174 pastrygirl

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 03:14 PM

A few dozen pieces or a few dozen moulds? I love buying kitchen toys as much as anyone, but if you're only doing a few moulds at a time, I'd skip the melter/temperer, maybe rig up a heating pad if your kitchen is cold, and spend the money on a nice thermometer, more moulds, cool transfer sheets & colors, maybe an airbrush...

#175 Kerry Beal

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 08:08 PM

What pastrygirl says - when I need smaller quantities I temper in an 8 cup pyrex measuring cup in the microwave.  But I do understand the need for toys as well.

 

The thing I like about the melter vs the temperer is how quiet the melter is.


Edited by Kerry Beal, 21 November 2013 - 08:09 PM.


#176 Mjx

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 01:52 AM

A few dozen pieces or a few dozen moulds? I love buying kitchen toys as much as anyone, but if you're only doing a few moulds at a time, I'd skip the melter/temperer, maybe rig up a heating pad if your kitchen is cold, and spend the money on a nice thermometer, more moulds, cool transfer sheets & colors, maybe an airbrush...

 

We're talking a few (okay, maybe several – the moulds are pretty large) dozen pieces. Maybe a hundred or so. i really should count the wells in the moulds.

 

I'm trying to convince my boyfriend that the Thermapen we already have, and a bain marie or microwave will really be fine, but that failing, I'm hoping to at least be able to suggest a decent unit, if there is simply no question of holding him back.

 

What pastrygirl says - when I need smaller quantities I temper in an 8 cup pyrex measuring cup in the microwave.  But I do understand the need for toys as well.

 

The thing I like about the melter vs the temperer is how quiet the melter is.

 

My boyfriend likes quiet, that may be an useful selling point. The Mol d'Art melter looks fairly decent, and is the most reasonably priced option I've seen (although the nearly €100 shipping and handling seems kind of crazy).

 

Thre don't seem to be that many tabletop units out there; I keep seeing the same handful, regardless of how I search (I've done searches in Italian, German, and French, as well as English, to see whether those turn up anything extra), I'm wondering whether I'm missing something.


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#177 keychris

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 06:46 PM

I have two 6kg Mol d'Art melters and a 3kg round bowl. I use the 6kg regularly, simply because I can turn a whole mould upside down to empty the chocolate out - with the 3kg bowl, I can only do half-moulds at a time. It takes me no longer to temper 4kg by tabling than 2kg by seeding - in fact, I'd probably go so far as saying tabling is faster than seeding. But if you haven't got a big chunk of stone to work on, that option might not be available.

When I started out, I used a thermapen and bowl-in-microwave and achieved exactly the same results - the biggest advantage now is I can hold the chocolate at working temperature as long as I need it :)

I'm pretty sure that if the minimum a temperer would work with was 2kg, that's exactly how much would be put in, and I don't even want to think about how many chocolates that would yield.


The beautiful thing is that you can just spread it out on some silicon paper when you're finished and leave it to set and just remelt next time! (I'm sure you already knew this though ;))





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