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1 sachet de levure


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Lesley C

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 08:32 AM

Calling all French bakers:

I have a recipe for a savoury aperitif cake that calls for 1 sachet de levure.
I'm assuming it's levure chimique (baking powder) but I'm not quite sure of the equivalent in teaspoons or grams. I found a web site that said it was 4 teaspoons.
Can any one confirm or correct this?

Thanks :smile:

Edited by Lesley C, 02 December 2005 - 09:17 AM.


#2 carswell

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 08:45 AM

Don't know if the sachets are a different size in France, but Oetker's are 5 teaspoons (20 g).

#3 oceanfish

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 09:03 AM

I had some sachets which I purchased in New York awhile back. On the packet it said levure, but yes it was levure chimique. I've always wondered if this contains a secret ingredient other than baking powder. It seems to produce a different result than the "magic" baking powder I normally use. I don't recall the brand name, but I took note of the weight: 16 grams.

#4 oceanfish

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 09:05 AM

I meant to ask what else goes into the savoury aperatif cake. It sounds intriguing.

#5 Lesley C

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 09:10 AM

Zucchini and goat's cheese

#6 carswell

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 09:23 AM

Googling shows that many French sachets are 11 g, though the first site listed says they're 11 to 16 g.

http://www.supertoin...re_chimique.htm
(photo shows an 11-g packet)

http://www.novascoop...hp3?id_breve=14

http://www.intermarc...uit.php?id=2774

http://72.14.207.104.....2211 g"&hl=en

Edited by carswell, 02 December 2005 - 09:23 AM.


#7 Lesley C

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 09:26 AM

Urg, this is what I was afraid of. The difference between 2 1/2 and 4 teaspoons is significant.
God, French recipes are the worst. When will French cookbook writers get their act together? :hmmm:

#8 BettyK

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 03:11 PM

I have 11 grams in my notes. And here's a discussion on Levure for cakes.

#9 Woods

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 07:34 AM

I have 11 grams in my notes. And here's a discussion on  Levure for cakes.

View Post



I think you are right Betty. I recall seeing 11 or 12 g on Dr. Oetker yeast

#10 Lesley C

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 12:07 PM

Thanks to everyone.
I made the cake with 3 teaspoons baking powder (12g) and it looked lovely. But about 5 minutes after it came out of the oven, the bloody thing fell. When I sliced it later, the base of the cake looked quite compact and gummy, which makes me think it needed more time in the oven. I already had upped the baking time from 45 minutes to 55, but now I'm thinking 65. Also, these cakes are so weighed down with ingredients (this recipe had sauteed zucchini, goat's cheese cubes, herbs and grated gruyere, that I'm not too surprised it can't maintain the lift).
Tasted good though.