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White chocolate ganache

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84 replies to this topic

#61 chocofoodie

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 03:36 AM

Thanks everyone for your comments. I think I am going to follow your advice and practise more direct recipes. And not white chocolate ones! I cant wait for the Grewling book to come in to help with that.

In the end, the first batch that had less chocolate actually tasted better (it was soft, but smooth). The second experimental batch, where I added more chocolate, was very crumbly in texture.

#62 greenbean

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 08:34 AM

I recently made some little chocate ganache cakes for a baby shower and the friend I made them for said that her daughter wants them for her birthday. This started me thinking that I may need a different covering than dark chocolate ganache. Has anyone ever made a white chocolate ganache?

I have a recipe that I received at a demo (I'm a recovering PC), but I've never tried it myself. I have searched the web for recipes and reviews and there was much talking of separation and curdling. For basic ganache I use a 3/2 chocolate to cream ratio, but I know there is a difference for white or milk chocolate. I know I can use poured fondant, but it has it's limitations.

Has anyone made white chocolate ganache and what are your thoughts, recommendations, tips or tales?

Thanks

Greenbean

#63 pastrygirl

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 08:41 AM

Are you talking poured ganache, whipped ganache, spreading ganache between layers? You do need to use less cream with white chocolate. For a stiff ganache, 2:1 chocolate to cream for dark and 2.5:1 for white, more cream for pouring. I recently made white with that proportion (and lime zest) to ice some carrot cupcakes, it was good at room temperature, pretty thick and stayed on the cupcakes, and the cashews stayed in place on top. It was not totally opaque, but I was also in a hurry and used it still a little warm so it was a pretty thin layer (1/8"?). The extra was very solid after refrigeration.

#64 greenbean

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 04:18 AM

Are you talking poured ganache, whipped ganache, spreading ganache between layers? 


I was definitely looking for something pourable, but thick enough to cover.

Were you able to emulsify this by hand (whisk or rubber spatula) or did you have to use an immersion blender? (I've heard talk of the blenders for WCG). Also, what brand of white chocolate did you use?

Thanks for the feedback,
Greenbean

#65 pastrygirl

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 06:52 AM

Greenbean, it came together fine with a spatula - luckily, as we don't have an immersion blender at that location.

#66 QbanCrackr

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 01:32 PM

I originally tried doing a white ganache (8oz:4oz), but the end result never set up...2nd time around i added some more chocolate (12oz:4oz) and it setup alot better than the first time (white chocolate lime), but since the lime flavors weren't as pronounced as i would have wanted, today I came back to try and get the flavors where i wanted. I used the same ratio of chocolate to cream but it came out weird...I took some pics to show.

It looks separated almost? not how my ganache normally comes out at all (its almost greasy both to the touch & in mouthfeel) but the taste was good at least.

Any ideas of why this happened? This is only my 3rd time working with white chocolate ganache.

D

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Danny

#67 Lior

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 02:16 PM

It looks separated for sure! Try using a hand held blemder/emulsifier to get it emulsified. That usually works. If not then there are different options like adding some alcohol or milk...but first try the emulsifier. I usually do closer to a 3:1 for a white ganache. Adding some glucose or honey even will giveit a bit of a shine and a good texture and it even helps in emulsifying it. Good luck

#68 QbanCrackr

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 02:56 PM

i took yr advice there, i heated it up a little to be able to get at it with the immersion blender easier and then did that until it started to come together then i just had at it with the whisk.

in the end, the ganache came back together and i broke my whisk.

ganache: 1
whisk: 0

since you have so much more chocolate than cream in the 3:1, how do you melt all the chocolate without it separating?

melt the chocolate first then add it with the cream?
Danny

#69 Lior

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 03:07 PM

You can melt and temper the chocolate and leave it is liquidy, but then you should add the cream at around the same temp as the chocolate (30). I usually just zap it till some is a bit meltly, and then mix it together as much as poss and when it is kind of partially melty and lumpy and sticky (do you know what I mean?) add the hot cream, which can be infused with flavors. Pour onto cake when both are not hot, but ganache is still pourable. It is late here... sorry for the weird descriptions.

#70 parameda

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:15 PM

Is there a way to reduce the white chocolate ganache sweetness? I made some fillings with raspberries and some with banana but I don't like the intrusiveness of white choc. Can anyone help, please?



#71 Kerry Beal

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:24 PM

Which white chocolate are you using?



#72 parameda

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 03:05 AM

I'm using Belcolade white chocolate discs



#73 Kerry Beal

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 06:17 AM

I use the same for most - not as sweet as some!  I generally add a bit of citric acid to fruit centers - also to make the chocolate take a back seat - I'll try to build layers of the fruit flavour - so fruit, a bit of flavour compound and maybe some powdered freeze dried fruit.  Then some complimentary booze - so kirsch with the raspberry, lemon with the banana.



#74 parameda

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:29 AM

Thanks Karry. So, how much citric acid do you add? I read somewhere that people also use salt for this but I'm a bit suspicious about that. Has anyone tried?



#75 Kerry Beal

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:36 AM

I use about 1/2 tsp (not sure of the gram weight) for a recipe that makes 250 centres.



#76 parameda

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 10:13 AM

thank you, I'll try it



#77 Alleguede

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:58 PM

You can use as well some of the new chocolates on the market who are not as sweet. For fruit fillings, you can also use variations such as caramels or jellies.

#78 Mjx

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 02:53 AM

. . . . I read somewhere that people also use salt for this but I'm a bit suspicious about that. Has anyone tried?

 

I seldom make anything with white chocolate, but when I do, I always add a tiny amount of salt (I use a mill to reduce it to really fine dust, so it distributes more quickly). It is not perceivable as salt, but I find that this really cuts the insipid and cloying oversweetness that easily dominates white chocoate.

 

In fact, there are few sweets that I don't add a very small amount of salt to.


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#79 Jim D.

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 08:01 AM

You can use as well some of the new chocolates on the market who are not as sweet. For fruit fillings, you can also use variations such as caramels or jellies.

Would you mind listing some of these new chocolates?  I use Valrhona's Opalys quite a bit and like its flavor; since I switched to it, several people have remarked that they never liked white chocolate previously but do enjoy it now.  I'd like to try any others there are.



#80 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 09:13 AM

I suspect it's the Cacoa Barry Zephyr that Rodney is referring to  - I know he's been making use of it.

 

 



#81 Alleguede

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:41 PM

Yes there is zephyr from cacao Barry - opalys from Valrhona - I do like the ivoire as well. Callebaut has the new CHW-R2241NV these are for me the less sweet on the affordable market.

I use to use satin. But the sweetness was just overwhelming. I can't afford really to pay for Valrhona so my alternative was zephyr. We have a yogurt/strawberry cake which can't taste the chocolate.

I also heard felchin had a good product - unavailable in Canada.

#82 cmflick

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 04:47 AM

I use about 1/2 tsp (not sure of the gram weight) for a recipe that makes 250 centres.

Kerry, how much weight of ganache are you using to make 250 centers?  I want to try using citric acid, but want to make a lot less centers.  Also, when do you add the citric acid?



#83 Kerry Beal

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 05:32 AM

Probably about 10 grams a center.  When I'm making a smaller batch I have these little measuring spoons that read pinch etc - I use the one that says pinch.

 

I would add it with the liquid.



#84 cmflick

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 06:45 AM

Probably about 10 grams a center.  When I'm making a smaller batch I have these little measuring spoons that read pinch etc - I use the one that says pinch.

 

I would add it with the liquid.

Thanks for the response, Kerry.  Have you used citric acid with centers containing cream?  I know that you can curdle milk with citric acid to make queso fresco.



#85 Kerry Beal

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 07:15 AM

I have - given the amount I haven't noticed an issue with the cream curdling.  Most often I'm using it in fruit containing ganaches.







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