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White chocolate ganache

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84 replies to this topic

#1 tan319

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 03:00 PM

I'm looking for one :biggrin:
Most appreciated if you can help.
Thanks!
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#2 pastrymama

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 04:17 PM

Hi, I make mine with a good white chocolate such as Valrhona or Callebaut and use one half the cream that I would use in a dark ganache. One pound of white chocolate and one half pound cream, then I whisk it until it begins to whiten a bit. If you don't whisk it, stays sort of yellowish. Hope this will help you. :smile:
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#3 tan319

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 04:24 PM

Thanks very much.
I'll have to try this.
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#4 chefette

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Posted 11 November 2003 - 07:17 AM

Generally you need to go to a 2:1 ratio for white chocolate. As with dark chocolate ganache a little Karo syrup or invert sugar is good for texture and some butter whisked in at the end improves mouth feel. Are you going for a plain white or something leveraging the neutrality of the white chocolate? White is fun since you can bring out more spice, nut, caqramel, other flavors. The drawback is the sweetness and often the color is less attractive that one might desire. At this time of year I like doing a white chocolate Eggnog Ganache.

Depending on what you will be using the ganache for you may want to go with slightly more or less chocolate to cream, I add nutmeg and a touch of rum, finish with butter. I think its fun as a filling in very intense dark chocolate molded candies.

White chocolate also makes nice pistachio ganache. Best to use the Agrimontana pistachio paste available through Qzina - thin, smooth, intensely green, wonderful nutty pistachio aroma an taste.

#5 tan319

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Posted 11 November 2003 - 09:49 AM

Thanks,chefette.
I'm thinking of trying it for a molten center of a cake.
I do like infusing white chocolate for ice cream or mousses with spices and other things.
Thanks again.
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#6 singsgood

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Posted 13 November 2003 - 05:45 PM

The Cake Bible has a very nice recipe for this. Turns out well.

#7 bfujimoto

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Posted 13 November 2003 - 06:45 PM

I've had good luck using 1.5 pounds of white chocolate, 1 cup of cream, and 1 stick butter. This makes for a runnier ganache when melted, but it sets up very well after refrigerated.

#8 chocophile

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 10:06 AM

The recipe is here: "White Chocolate Ganache With Tahitian Vanilla Bean."

From the intro to the story on MSNBC.com:

Chocolate is the quintessential Valentine's Day gift. But instead of the usual boxed confection, why not surprise your valentine with a homemade delicacy? Chef Norman Love, who has designed chocolate for Godiva and was the corporate pastry chef at the Ritz Carlton, was invited on "Today" to share his recipe for white chocolate ganache, a sweet creamy chocolate mixture often used as a filling or frosting.

:Clay
Clay Gordon
president, pureorigin
editor/publisher www.chocophile.com
founder, New World Chocolate Society

#9 Tonyy13

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 10:52 AM

Norman Love is one of the best pastry chefs in the biz. I got a chance to work with him at EPCOT a few years back, and a really nice guy to boot!! I can still taste the pistachio ice cream dessert that he made, it was awesome!!!!! Nothing like quenelling for 80.... to order!!

Now I am depressed I missed him on tv....
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#10 oli

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 01:46 PM

Norman Love is one of the best pastry chefs in the biz.  I got a chance to work with him at EPCOT a few years back, and a really nice guy to boot!!  I can still taste the pistachio ice cream dessert that he made, it was awesome!!!!!  Nothing like quenelling for 80.... to order!! 

Now I am depressed I missed him on tv....

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Would this ganache work, poured over a chocolate cake? Is it sliceable without cracking?

#11 choux

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 02:27 PM

If you click on the link in the first message you can watch the clip. You have to deal with an annoying Cadillac ad, but it is short.

#12 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 05:25 AM

I'm a huge fan of Norman Love! I attended a demo he gave (a few years back) and he really influenced me. I use his methods and recipes for my truffles. Your very lucky Tonyy13, I wish I had had that honor.

His ganche recipes may very well work poured over a cake. He tends to keep his ganches creamy verses a stiff ganche. Give it a try Oli!

#13 jgarner53

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 11:49 AM

I wanted to watch the video but apparently MSN Video doesn't support Macs. Bastards. :angry:
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#14 bripastryguy

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 08:56 AM

I have been looking for a good opaque white chocolate glaze to use on some individuals to break up my "dark" ganache desserts. Anyone have a recipe that works? I have tried some purchased white chocolate mirror glaze, not real happy and it costs too much
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
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#15 ladyyoung98

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 01:55 PM

you can alwyas take some white chocolate chips and melt them down...just a suggestion though u would have to use butter and egg yolks in it to get something liek a ganache.. i can give u a recipe for such
2 egg yolks
1 lb sweet butter
2 pkgs whtie chocolate chips

melt chips over a double boiler. remove and add eg yolks and butter. beat together...

im not sure how opaque it would be though
let me know if this works for you

Edited by ladyyoung98, 19 September 2005 - 02:00 PM.

a recipe is merely a suggestion

#16 chefpeon

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 05:04 PM

Bri.....here's one for you!

White Chocolate Ganache with Tahitian Vanilla Bean (or not)

7 ounces heavy whipping cream
1 ounce corn syrup
1 vanilla bean, split (you can also use extract of course, or leave it out altogether)
13 ounces white chocolate
1-1/2 ounces unsalted butter

Combine the cream, corn syrup, and vanilla bean in pan, and bring to a boil. Chop white
chocolate, if not already in small pieces. When liquid boils, pour over chopped white chocolate
and mix to create a smooth ganache. Add the butter, remove vanilla bean if used, and
allow to cool.

Edited by chefpeon, 19 September 2005 - 05:04 PM.


#17 bripastryguy

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 01:33 PM

Ann,

Is the ounces in weight or fluid?
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
Brian Fishman

#18 Patrick S

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 02:30 PM

Almost certainly, they all refer to weight.
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#19 chefpeon

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 03:24 PM

Is the ounces in weight or fluid?


Uh, that would be weight......but even if you measure out fluid ounces by volume with the cream and corn syrup, you'll still be in the same ballpark.....

#20 Aria

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 07:30 AM

The holidays are fast approaching and I'm experimenting with a white chocolate and cranberry ganache enrobed in tempered white chocolate. Could someone help me with the following:

- When I melt the white chocolate with the hot cream, everything turns into a mild yellowy glop! Once the ganache sets, it's not bad but not great tasting.

- While melting my white chocolate for tempering ( for the coating ), all the pieces don't melt and that makes everything a mess when I transfer some of it on a marble slab for agitation!

I really want this to work because when topped with some course red sugar the look is devine! Once again, the finished product tastes alright.
Thank you so very much!

#21 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 10:56 AM

When I melt the white chocolate with the hot cream, everything turns into a mild yellowy glop! Once the ganache sets, it's not bad but not great tasting.

I'm pretty sure this has to do with melting it over water that is too hot. Flo Braker suggests 120F as the temperature of your water. I have disregarded this info in the past and ended up with the yellow glop you mention. Not so bad when it's in a truffle but really bad if you are planning to coat petit fours with it. :wacko:
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#22 Truffle Guy

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 04:44 PM

What type of white chocolate are you using? If you are using "chips" from a grocer, they probably are not chocolate and have palm oil etc. If you are using white chocolate, I've found that I often have to really spend more time blending the chocolate/cream together. Eventually, it does lose that grainy, globby look and pick up a smooth consistency and shine. You may want to emulsify or use a blender on the ganache. Also, maybe chop the chocolate even finer to help it melt better with the cream.

You may want to chop the white chocolate for tempering into even small pieces to see if that helps with the consistency of your tempered chocolate. I even have added cocoa butter to help create a thinner viscosity. Are you heating it too fast? It might be a slower process will melt all the chocolate or you may need to agitate the chocolate while tempering with a dipping fork. That generally helps my chocolate to all melt.

The holidays are fast approaching and I'm experimenting with a white chocolate and cranberry ganache enrobed in tempered white chocolate. Could someone help me with the following:

- When I melt the white chocolate with the hot cream, everything turns into a mild yellowy glop! Once the ganache sets, it's not bad but not great tasting.

- While melting my white chocolate for tempering ( for the coating ), all the pieces don't melt and that makes everything a mess when I transfer some of it on a marble slab for agitation!

I really want this to work because when topped with some course red sugar the look is devine! Once again, the finished product tastes alright.
Thank you so very much!

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#23 Aria

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 05:02 PM

What type of white chocolate are you using? 

I use Lindt white couverture.

Thanks a lot!

#24 Sebastian

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 06:06 AM

The yellowness could be from a number of things
1) overheating, as previously suggested
2) separation of the cocoa butter (it's got a yellow tint)
3) the milk source used (however, lindt typically uses a very good dairy source)
4) aged product - as white chocolate gets older, it gets yellower. also if exposed to light for extended periods of time, it's gonna change color (especially when exposed to florescent lights)

as for the glopping on melting, it's a sure sign that you've either inadvertantly got water in somehow, it's old product (white chocolate is notorious for absorbing ambient moiture from it's environment) or you've overheated it. You may be able to make it easier to work with by adding a drop of fluid lecithin to it and mixing vigorously.

#25 Aria

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 08:28 PM

Thank you so much for all your responses!

#26 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 08:08 AM

as for the glopping on melting, it's a sure sign that you've either inadvertantly got water in somehow, it's old product (white chocolate is notorious for absorbing ambient moiture from it's environment) or you've overheated it.  You may be able to make it easier to work with by adding a drop of fluid lecithin to it and mixing vigorously.

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From my experience, I tend to disagree with the thought that glopping was caused by getting water into your ganche. Although it is possible, I don't think it's probable.

Instead, I find it very easy to get 'globbing' with white chocolate ganche if there's the slighest inbalance. Inbalance as in: not enough cream to chocolate ratio, not emulsified enough and certain brands of chocolate and or cream don't melt out like they should/or are expected to and sometimes the cocoa butter wants to seperate out even though you haven't over heated your cream.

For example, I used to use Flechlin chocolates and never in my years of using it did I encounter any ganche related problems. I never knew of, yet alone experienced a broken emulsion. But, currently I'm using E. Guittard and I've had to adjust all my ganche recipes because if I use the same proportions of cream to chocolate my ganches are all too dense/firm.

Although I can't prove it, it could also be the cream you have. I've had heavy cream that was low in butter fat and wouldn't even whip (like half and half) and I've had heavy cream that was so dense with fat it clops. So if your cream was off (which happens regardless of what the carton label says) you would get different results.

Also when making white chocolate ganche theres a very fine line between too thin and too thick. When your trying to achieve a thick white chocolate ganche your ganche will be very hard to emusify well, even when using a stick blender. A little less cream to chocolate ratio and you've got globs. A little too much cream and it remains very thin.

I believe the yellow color is something that becomes more evidient when you make a white chocolate ganche verses looking at the solid white chocolate. White chocolate ganche is yellow if your using real white chocolate that contains cocoa butter.

#27 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 08:17 AM

- While melting my white chocolate for tempering ( for the coating ), all the pieces don't melt and that makes everything a mess when I transfer some of it on a marble slab for agitation!

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I assume your talking about when you temper your chocolate for covering your ganche......your not bothering to temper your chocolate for the ganche, right? (some people think they have to temper chocolate in all applications, so I'm just checking)

When I temper chocolate I use my stick blender.........and love it! It's a great tool for tempering.

Your chocolate needs to be completely melted before tabling it.......so you shouldn't have begun tabling before.

It is hard to melt/temper white chocolate because of what a low temp. it requires. Thats where the stick blender does wonders. It pulverizes your chocolate so fine that the tiny particals easily melt down at that low temp.. Where as stirring with a spatula doesn't really break down your smaller unmelted bits........and you naturally want to apply more heat to get those tiny bits to melt out.

I also use my stick blender to temper my chocolate so I don't have to table it (making a mess)........and it's such a breeze............I promise.

#28 scott123

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 10:37 AM

(white chocolate is notorious for absorbing ambient moiture from it's environment)

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Any theories as to why this might be?

Dark chocolate doesn't suffer from this trait, does it? Maybe I'm oversimplifying a bit, but isn't white chocolate just dark chocolate with the cocoa particulate matter subbed out with dried milk? Can it be some aspect of the dried milk that's causing this? The lactose perhaps? The whey? Is dried milk more hygroscopic than cocoa?

#29 choux

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 02:41 PM

Probably because white chocolate has a lot more sugar than dark chocolate and it is the sugar that absorbs the water.

#30 Sebastian

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Posted 30 November 2005 - 04:40 PM

Wendy - i took her problem to mean that she was having difficulties physically melting the chocolate in a smooth fashion, not that she was having difficulties getting the chocolate and the cream to mix together in a smooth fashion. If the issue was not that the chocolate wouldn't physically melt smoothly, but rather that it was being problematic only after the ccream was added, then i'd agree that not sufficient cream was being added - but my gut feel is that this is unlikely, as chocolate will 'glop' with the addition of the first few % of water, then this significantly reduces as more water is added. I've yet to see any one add so little cream that only a few % of water was present....

Scott - there are a few reasons for this. One is indeed the elevated levels of lactose, and part of the problem has to do with how lactose behaves as it transitions from a crystallline product to an amorphous product, and vice verse. Part of it has to do with how it attracts moisture, how it releases moisture (some of the lactose will be present as a mono and di-hydrate), vs how it holds onto moisture. Some of it has to do with the physical formulation of the white chocolate - if nonfat dried milk and anhydrous milk fat are used (essentially reconstituting dried whole milk, if you will), the product is much more stable over time. If high levels of whole milk powder are used, the product can exhibit difficulties in melting very, very quickly. Some of that is due to the presence of higher free fat in the NFDM version (if both products are formulated to say 35% total fat, the NFDM product has more 'free' fat from the anhydrous mlk fat than does the dried WMP, which has approximately 25% of it's fat 'bound' in the amorphous structure of the milk particulates). However, there's something else occurring there that i've not quite put my finger on yet, and I've not seen any technical papers that identify it. It may have to do with the levels of casein present (casein can act as a decent emulsifier), as well as the physical form of the casein (is it denatured, partially denatured, intact? likely some ratio of the three).

Almost all of the water present in sucrose will be surface bound - via electric double layers or adhesion. As choux notes, it's likely that the higher sucrose levels may be adding to this problem, but i'm not conviced that's the cause of the problem. Interestingly, it's very very rare to see this type of behaviour in products that contain cocoa solids, but it milk, dark,or compound products - suggesting that there's a protective element to the cocoa solids - but again, i've not been able to quite put my finger on just what that mechanism is yet.

I'd think that the interactions of milk proteins and cocoa proteins vs rheological aspects would make for a very interesting research topic for the aspiring higher ed student...

Edit - i should also point out that overheating the product during melting will cause significant problems with the melting process as well, as you're going to denature milk protiens, and once you do this, there's no fixing it.

Edited by Sebastian, 30 November 2005 - 04:42 PM.






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