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Civet of Hare


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5 replies to this topic

#1 FoodMan

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 08:26 AM

Hello Paula-
It has been a great pleasure, reading through and cooking from this one of a kind book.

I have a recipe question for you, about the “Civet of Hare”, it fascinates me and raises all kinds of questions. I have never in my wildest dreams thought about buying an animal, dispatching it in my home and collecting it’s blood. The more I read through the recipe though the more I get how personal it is to you and I actually would like to attempt it if possible and maybe understand why you love it so much.

I have never seen a live hare, let alone have access to one. The only one I can get is frozen. Where would I get a live hare? Is there a substitute? What if I procure a frozen or already dressed one, can the recipe still be done successfully? How/where did the tester test the recipe?

Many thanks for taking the time to join us in this conversation.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com


#2 Wolfert

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:01 PM

Hello Paula-
It has been a great pleasure, reading through and cooking from this one of a kind book.

I have a recipe question for you, about the “Civet of Hare”, it fascinates me and raises all kinds of questions. I have never in my wildest dreams thought about buying an animal, dispatching it in my home and collecting it’s blood. The more I read through the recipe though the more I get how personal it is to you and I actually would like to attempt it if possible and maybe understand why you love it so much.

I have never seen a live hare, let alone have access to one. The only one I can get is frozen. Where would I get a live hare? Is there a substitute? What if I procure a frozen or already dressed one, can the recipe still be done successfully? How/where did the tester test the recipe?

Many thanks for taking the time to join us in this conversation.

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In that case, I was the tester. Normally I test all the recipes in my books usually more than three times. The jugged hare recipe was an exception, tested only once because I'm not a hunter or married to one, and didn't have access to a shot hare. I did purchase fresh packed Scottish hare from d'Artagnan and used the liver instead of the blood.
I wrote the recipe in such a way that those who are hunters and know a healthy jack rabbit from one that is sick can make the dish properly as well.
In the introduction I mention the help I received from my friend Aude Clement, who taught me how to cut up a hare and also how to keep the blood.

As for just killing a hare, skinning it and carving it while it's still warm for the pot -- I decided that that was my "maginot line." If you don't hunt just follow the recipe as written (buying a hare, as I did, from d'Artagnan) and leave the rest of fantasy!

As I suggested in the recipe, you can do the dish with American jackrabbit or even duck legs and use duck or chicken liver in place of the blood.
“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#3 bleudauvergne

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 10:59 PM

For readers who have not figured it out yet, d'Artagnan is one of the mail order sources for products that Paula lists in the annex in the back of the book.

#4 FoodMan

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 09:13 AM

For readers who have not figured it out yet, d'Artagnan is one of the mail order sources for products that Paula lists in the annex in the back of the book.

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yeap...flown directly from Scotland.

Paula-
Can pig's blood be used? I have seen it at sevral local Asian markets.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com


#5 Wolfert

Wolfert
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Posted 17 November 2005 - 09:23 AM

For readers who have not figured it out yet, d'Artagnan is one of the mail order sources for products that Paula lists in the annex in the back of the book.

View Post


yeap...flown directly from Scotland.

Paula-
Can pig's blood be used? I have seen it at sevral local Asian markets.

View Post



I would imagine it would work. You don't need much, about 1/3 cup for each hare. If it comes in clots, try to break them up with a fork and press them through a sieve before using.

Elie, I really appreciate your enthusiasm to try new things. The stuffed duck neck sausage you tested for the book is on the menu tonight at chez panisse!!

Thursday, November 17 $65
Book signing for Paula Wolfert's The cooking of Southwest France
Duck gizzard salad à la périgordine
Coquilles Saint Jacques with chestnuts and wild mushrooms
Braised Sonoma County Liberty duck leg and stuffed duck neck sausage with
red wine sauce and cornmeal cakes
Prune and Armagnac ice cream crêpes
“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#6 FoodMan

FoodMan
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,316 posts

Posted 17 November 2005 - 09:26 AM

For readers who have not figured it out yet, d'Artagnan is one of the mail order sources for products that Paula lists in the annex in the back of the book.

View Post


yeap...flown directly from Scotland.

Paula-
Can pig's blood be used? I have seen it at sevral local Asian markets.

View Post



I would imagine it would work. You don't need much, about 1/3 cup for each hare. If it comes in clots, try to break them up with a fork and press them through a sieve before using.

Elie, I really appreciate your enthusiasm to try new things. The stuffed duck neck sausage you tested for the book is on the menu tonight at chez panisse!!

Thursday, November 17 $65
Book signing for Paula Wolfert's The cooking of Southwest France
Duck gizzard salad à la périgordine
Coquilles Saint Jacques with chestnuts and wild mushrooms
Braised Sonoma County Liberty duck leg and stuffed duck neck sausage with
red wine sauce and cornmeal cakes
Prune and Armagnac ice cream crêpes

View Post


sounds wonderful, too bad Chez Panisse is thousands of miles away :sad: .

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com