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High-Tech Kitchen Equipment


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#1 akwa

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 04:03 PM

frix-air?
anti-griddle?
where's the hotness under 2000
and over
wg

#2 tan319

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 09:51 PM

Whoahhhh!!!!
Wait a minute.
The Frix -Air SURE resembles a Paco Jet...

Frix-Air
Damn!
Can you elaborate, akwa?

some links to some of the other things akwa speaks of..

tech stuff

anti griddle

Is the anti griddle liquid nitrogen cooled?
2317/5000

#3 akwa

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 10:16 PM

frix air i was alerted to by peter swanson
yes pacoesque but the price of 150 for 50 beakers reminds me of another old campaign

whats the word
thunderbird
whats the price
mighty nice

antigriddle does not work by liquid nitrogen and is therefore not technically related to the teppannitro concept; a rose is a rose is a rose

not surprising to see moto blow the barn doors off and i gots me a call into the inventolux himself

basically, if it is in magazines, chances are it is not that new, but why not roll the die

seacrest out

#4 Fat Guy

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 11:06 PM

TurboChef. Two-minute souffle.
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#5 Jason Perlow

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 11:17 PM

What about the new blue cryonic laser Pacojet that can turn maple syrup into sorbet? I heard some dude at the European Space Agency working on a closed-system rocket engine came up with it.
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#6 akwa

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 11:36 PM

TurboChef. Two-minute souffle.

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worked with turbochef this summer
not under 2000 dollars
is a wild machine
do you know the lincoln dual tech finisher?

#7 akwa

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 11:37 PM

What about the new blue cryonic laser Pacojet that can turn maple syrup into sorbet? I heard some dude at the European Space Agency working on a closed-system rocket engine came up with it.

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dont even know if this is serious but probably out of my price range
can you provide a link if this is not a sid finch esque reference
wg

#8 akwa

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 09:14 AM

What about the new blue cryonic laser Pacojet that can turn maple syrup into sorbet? I heard some dude at the European Space Agency working on a closed-system rocket engine came up with it.

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hey jason
i just talked with the president of pacojet
he liked your idea
coming soon?
wg

#9 alexw

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 10:03 AM

personally would like 2 gadgets Heston is playing with

Reveo, like a vacuum tumbler where you can lock liquid within a solid, possiblities for self saucing meats, also infuse lamb with vapour of garlic and rosemary, which leads me to.....

the vapour captur thingy he has, where you can heat up whatever (garlic for example) and hold at a certain temp (40c for garlic), then the vapour condenses leaving pure notes without and bitter astringent aftertastes.

would have to re-mortgae and set up an account with the fischer scientific catalogue, don't know if my darling wife would understand.

as for frix-air, have heard things about this like not as smooth as a pacojet. so really what is the point, if you are going to go to the extremes of utilising a piece of equipment such as this, why only go half way? :hmmm:

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but not so, spending my time playing not working

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#10 Jason Perlow

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 10:38 AM

What about the new blue cryonic laser Pacojet that can turn maple syrup into sorbet? I heard some dude at the European Space Agency working on a closed-system rocket engine came up with it.

View Post


hey jason
i just talked with the president of pacojet
he liked your idea
coming soon?
wg

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If I can get NathanM to license us the space alien technology from the Roswell crash required to pull it off, and EU funding, I think we can get a product ready by 2036. We can then open a Gelato stand in the CERN supercollider facility with it.
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#11 akwa

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 11:46 AM

isnt the tumbler just typical sausage making technology?
regards to vaporizer, anyone know of a less dear one
chefg had a gift
i need to find gift givers
stocking stuffers?

jp ill share a beer in 2036
wg

my daughter will be 31, and finally allowed to date

#12 jsolomon

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 11:55 AM

Is the anti griddle liquid nitrogen cooled?

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For the -30 degrees, it's probably just a good freezer compressor and a reciruculator with an ethylene glycol/water mixture... just like the lauda recirculator I've got in my laboratory.
I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

#13 stscam

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 12:42 PM

The Frix-Air looks very cool and its cheaper than a Paco. And yes, the canisters are much cheaper, but did you notice they only hold a third of the Paco's container capacity? It'll be interesting to see what PC's and Chefs think of the Frix once it gets into kitchens.

Cheers,.
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#14 jsolomon

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 02:10 PM

the vapour captur thingy he has, where you can heat up whatever (garlic for example) and hold at a certain temp (40c for garlic), then the vapour condenses leaving pure notes without and bitter astringent aftertastes.

would have to re-mortgae and set up an account with the fischer scientific catalogue, don't know if my darling wife would understand.

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Really, that can be done with some pretty simple glassware and a good steady temperature source.

Check out labwarehouse.com for cheap glassware. Or, you can look at a rotovap, which is really cool. I always wanted to set up one to distill my own liqour, but never have.
I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

#15 akwa

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 05:10 PM

the vapour captur thingy he has, where you can heat up whatever (garlic for example) and hold at a certain temp (40c for garlic), then the vapour condenses leaving pure notes without and bitter astringent aftertastes.

would have to re-mortgae and set up an account with the fischer scientific catalogue, don't know if my darling wife would understand.

View Post

Really, that can be done with some pretty simple glassware and a good steady temperature source.

Check out labwarehouse.com for cheap glassware. Or, you can look at a rotovap, which is really cool. I always wanted to set up one to distill my own liqour, but never have.

View Post


where can you find rotovac?

#16 Fat Guy

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 06:11 PM

Thought you meant under 2000 for the monthly leasing fee . . .

Love the Ducasse recipe in the Spoon book that uses a "flocking gun."
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#17 akwa

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 07:44 PM

i flunked flock

#18 tan319

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 10:34 PM

TurboChef. Two-minute souffle.

View Post


worked with turbochef this summer
not under 2000 dollars
is a wild machine
do you know the lincoln dual tech finisher?

View Post


Can you guys elaborate on the TurboChef?
Two minute souffles?

Here's a link that will take you right to the testimonial page, Trotter, Dean Fearing are among the fine dining chefs "testifying".

TurboChef

F.G.: Did we conclude that the "Flocking Gun" was a Wagner Paint Sprayer or something like that?

Also, here's a link to the Lincoln Dual Tech Finisher...Lincoln Dual Tech

Are chefs getting into these finishing ovens because of speed or consistency or what?
I'm very curious about this...
2317/5000

#19 reachej

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 12:31 AM

Posted Image

Here's a Shanghai entry; "The Drip Machine"

EJ

#20 jackal10

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 01:57 AM

I've had for years a Panasonic combined microwave/grill/fan oven, with push button operation. Many other makes are available, at domestic prices (say around $500).
Glad to see professional equipment is catching up.

I hate the combination of microwave/radient heat cooking. I suppose its OK for frozen food, but IMHO it is not a good way of cooking.

Tech nominations:
Water baths;
Digital thermometers with wires that go thought the oven door and remote wireless displays;
Cook's blowtorch
and of course Egullet...

#21 akwa

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 08:31 AM

the drip machine?

#22 jsolomon

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 09:33 AM

where can you find rotovac?

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Dunno.

But, if you change the 'c' to a 'p'
I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

#23 reachej

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 11:13 AM

the drip machine?

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So far as I know there's only one, that we designed. It replaces the syringe for most applications that involve drops of liquid and allows the possibility of much higher volumes. Perhaps you have some ideas for it? We've used it mostly into liquid nitrogen, but calcium chloride solutions have had other positive results.

EJ

#24 Silly Disciple

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 01:19 PM

where can you find rotovac?

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The one used at The Fat Duck is manufactured by Buchi. Here's the link to the product page.
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#25 nathanm

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 02:37 PM

The "vaporizer" is a rotary evaporator. This is basically a high-tech distillation machine that allows you to distill under a vacuum.

They are not cheap, unless you get a used one.

Used glassware needs to be REALLY clean, or you could buy a used one and new glass.

There are many other ways to do something similar. People who make their own essential oils have similar distillation equipment. The rotary evap has the advantage that the temperature can be lower due to the vacuum, but a non-vacuum approach will work for many things. A soxhlet extraction column has some advantages. A full soxhlet outfit in glass is MUCH cheaper than the whole rotary evap outfit.

I have Buchi, which is the probably the best one, but Heidorf and Yammato also make them. For larger volume it gets both dificult and expensive, unless you go the non-vacuum route. The essential oil people make soxhlet and other extraction/distillation equipment up to very large sizes.

The Lincoln impinger is just a track grill or conveyor grill, and is hardly new. Every burger king has one!

Turbo Chef is old at this point. Many companies have mixed microwave and convection, and radient in various mixtures. I have a small one by Sharp, and it is OK, but generally not worth the hassle compared to a combi-oven. However if there is a specialty product like souffles and that is all you make then great.

Liquid nitogen doesn't really require much in the way of equipment, apart from a dewar and some cryo-gloves.

There are various chefs custom making things like the drip machine for doing alginate / calcium reaction, but in more complicated ways. This is basically a small version of industrial equipment made to make artifical cherries or other alginate/calcium reaction products.

So, here are some of the new tech goodies I am very interested in getting:

1. A critical point extraction set up. This is a way to extract flavor essences from food using liquid CO2 near its critical point.

2. Freeze drying equipment.

3. Very high shear mixers - for hydrating hydrocolloids

These are all beyond exotic - they aren't even commerial products necessarily, or if they are, they are beyond the Fisher Scientific / Cole-Palmer level and into the really weird stuff.

My current kitchen upgrades are much more tame (i.e. things it is possible to buy). I'm getting a Synesso espreosso machine - leagues beyond any other. I am upgrading my Rational comb-ovens, getting a new vacuum packing machine... these things are fun but don't make the grade for really new high tech gizmos.
Nathan

#26 akwa

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 04:43 PM

The "vaporizer" is a rotary evaporator.  This is basically a high-tech distillation machine that allows you to distill under a vacuum.

They are not cheap, unless you get a used one.

Used glassware needs to be REALLY clean, or you could buy a used one and new glass.

There are many other ways to do something similar.  People who make their own essential oils have similar distillation equipment.  The rotary evap has the advantage that the temperature can be lower due to the vacuum, but a non-vacuum approach will work for many things.  A soxhlet extraction column has some advantages.  A full soxhlet outfit in glass is MUCH cheaper than the whole rotary evap outfit.

I have Buchi, which is the probably the best one, but Heidorf and Yammato also make them.  For larger volume it gets both dificult and expensive, unless you go the non-vacuum route.  The essential oil people make soxhlet and other extraction/distillation equipment up to very large sizes.

The Lincoln impinger is just a track grill or conveyor grill, and is hardly new.  Every burger king has one!

Turbo Chef is old at this point.  Many companies have mixed microwave and convection, and radient in various mixtures.  I have a small one by Sharp, and it is OK, but generally not worth the hassle compared to a combi-oven.  However if there is a specialty product like souffles and that is all you make then great.

Liquid nitogen doesn't really require much in the way of equipment, apart from a dewar and some cryo-gloves. 

There are various chefs custom making things like the drip machine for doing alginate / calcium reaction, but in more complicated ways.  This is basically a small version of industrial equipment made to make artifical cherries or other alginate/calcium reaction products.

So, here are some of the new tech goodies I am very interested in getting:

1.  A critical point extraction set up.  This is a way to extract flavor essences from food using liquid CO2 near its critical point. 

2.  Freeze drying equipment. 

3.  Very high shear mixers - for hydrating hydrocolloids

These are all beyond exotic - they aren't even commerial products necessarily, or if they are, they are beyond the Fisher Scientific / Cole-Palmer level and into the really weird stuff.

My current kitchen upgrades are much more tame (i.e. things it is possible to buy). I'm getting a Synesso espreosso machine - leagues beyond any other.  I am upgrading my Rational comb-ovens, getting a new vacuum packing machine... these things are fun but don't make the grade for really new high tech gizmos.

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hey nathan
what do you do with the used equipment?
lol
wg

#27 akwa

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 04:46 PM

hey nathanm
can you explain the difference between alihn and friedrich style bulb
wg

#28 nathanm

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 07:48 PM

hey nathanm
can you explain the difference between  alihn and friedrich style bulb
wg

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There are several common variations in distillation columns. One aspect is condenser design - how the unit cools hot gases to make some of them condense like dew on the condenser. Alihn, spiral and others are variations that may have some advantages in some contexts, but it is not a big deal for most of what you'd want to do with cooking.

The only big difference in condensers is the cold trap style that is meant to be used with something extreme cold (dry ice). However, most cooking uses do not need or want extreme cold condensnig coolant.

Note however that different condensing columns can be set up in a variety of ways to achieve VERY different results. That difference is things like whether you do direct distillation, reflux distillation, soxhlet extraction, fractional distillation etc. This is NOT the same as condenser design - it is how the condenser is connected to the rest of the system.
Nathan

#29 jackal10

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 03:58 AM

The things that have made the biggest differences for me are accurate electronic scales and thermometers.

Besides the usual induction hobs, water baths, ISI whippers, wood fired brick bread oven, dehydrator/dessicator (which I have) here are some more unusual things not yet made it to my kitchen.

Wet grinder/stone edge mill: used in Asian cooking for idlies, vadas, dosas, and poories, but many applications to get those light textures http://www.innoconce...m/prideplus.htm

Ultrasonic emulsifier/homogeniser. http://www.biologics...m/sonicator.htm I'm sure here is some mileage here. Many sauces are fat/liquid emulsions. Interesting things happen if the particle or droplet size is small enough. In the old days a cream maker emulsifier was sometimes used to make a cream from milk and butterfat. Many other combinationas are possible, such as bacon/red wine. Using modern technology I think a new range of sauces might be possible

Double screw extruder. http://www.dayijixie...ish/slg65_e.asp Many snack foods are made by extrusion of a starch mass through a heated double screw extruder, that kneads and condtions the starch in a way that is hard to reproduce otherwise. I'd love a domestic scale one

Tweedy vacuum mixer. http://www.apvbaker....kery/tweedy.php
In commercial bakeries using a short-time dough system they feature high intensity mixing under air pressure and then vacuum to expand the dough. A domestic version would be interesting

Edited by jackal10, 06 November 2005 - 04:06 AM.


#30 Silly Disciple

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 05:08 AM

Ultrasonic emulsifier/homogeniser. http://www.biologics...m/sonicator.htm I'm sure here is some mileage here. Many sauces are fat/liquid emulsions. Interesting things happen if the particle or droplet size is small enough. In the old days a cream maker emulsifier was sometimes used to make a cream from milk and butterfat. Many other combinationas are possible, such as bacon/red wine. Using modern technology I  think a new range of sauces might be possible


If I'm not mistaken, there's one such tool at The Fat Duck as well. Can't remember the brand though.
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