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New Generation Gins


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#61 Carolyn Tillie

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 08:59 AM

Hmmm.  I don't know about Broker's for Martinis (I've never used it for that purpose).  But I wouldn't think that the proof makes all that much difference, so long as one uses a decent amount of vermouth.  Tanqueray, at 94.6 proof, is the standard Martini gin for Pegu Club's Fitty-Fitty -- and I like it at as much as 4:1.


I think the saffron gin would be Cadenhead's Old Raj (packing a whopping 110 proof, I believe).

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Good point about the Tanqueray -- that part didn't dawn on me. I think the Broker's is just a bit too strong to make a good martini (for my taste anyway).

And you are right about the Cadenhead... would love to taste it, but not sure I'm ready to put out that kinda cash to find out!

#62 KatieLoeb

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 06:09 PM

Anyone tried the Baffert's gin or the Baffert's Mint Gin, which I have a sample bottle of in my posession?

I'll go try mix something up with it and I'll report back. I'm thinking minted gin + pineapple might be good.

edited to add:

2.5 oz. Baffert's Mint Gin
.5 oz. Giammona Pineapple syrup
1 barspoon fresh lime juice

A tasty and refreshing cocktail. The Baffert's Mint gin (and I suspect their regular gin as well) has definitely been formulated with the vodka drinker in mind. Nonetheless, this drink is a winner and would probably sell well in a commercial environment.

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#63 Nathan

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 09:14 AM

Interesting thread.

I've been a gin drinker all my life but never realized there was such a gamut of specialty gins.

I've always used Tanqueray with tonic and either Tanqueray or Plymouth (cause it's cheap) for cocktails.

Martinis have always been Sapphire or Old Raj....looks like I need to find some others. 209 or Junipero sound fascinating.

btw, maraschino in an Aviation? I use kirsch....what does maraschino liquor do for the taste?

#64 eje

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 10:37 AM

[...]
btw, maraschino in an Aviation?  I use kirsch....what does maraschino liquor do for the taste?

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Do you add sugar or simple syrup, then?

Maraschino is a liqueur made from wood aged and sweetened cherry brandy (kirsch).

I was recently traveling in a state where I could find no Maraschino liqueur, so substituted Clear Creek plum brandy mixed with simple syrup. It was actually not that far from Maraschino liqueur in flavor.

I was going to substitute sweetened Kirsch(wasser); but, the only brand I could find was Le Roux. It was one of the most horrible tasting things I have had recently. Cherry cough drops dissolved in kerosene.
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#65 Nathan

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 11:07 AM

no, but I detest sweetness in my drinks. prefer acidity.

#66 slkinsey

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 12:37 PM

btw, maraschino in an Aviation?  I use kirsch....what does maraschino liquor do for the taste?

eG Forums threads on. . .

Maraschino liqueur

The Aviation


Maraschino is a liqueur made from wood aged and sweetened cherry brandy (kirsch).

I wouldn't say that's exactly correct... Maraschino involves a special process in which the fruit is separated from the stems and pits, which are then distilled like grappa and the resultant liquor reincorporated at a later stage with the liquor distilled from the fruit. (More in the Maraschino liqueur thread).
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#67 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 12:42 PM

I was recently traveling in a state where I could find no Maraschino liqueur,

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Drink-addled?

#68 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 12:43 PM

(At the end of last night, I myself was in a state where I couldn't find my key.)

#69 eje

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 01:11 PM

I was recently traveling in a state where I could find no Maraschino liqueur,

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Drink-addled?

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Well, Wisconsin, actually.

Though, after a couple of my father-in-law's very stiff and tasty Overholt Old-Fashioneds it's definitely better if I don't find my keys.

Nathan, what proportions do you use for your Aviation?
---
Erik Ellestad
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#70 Nathan

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 01:18 PM

see the Aviation thread.

if you're in Milwaukee, ask the bartenders at Elsa's where to find maraschino liquor...they're the only ones who might know.

#71 Lan4Dawg

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 06:57 PM

we just had a delivery of New Amsterdam Gin fr/ the Gallo folks (supposedly the first "non-grape" product they have ever produced). I found a couple of single serving bottles for a taste test when I get home but was hoping to hear some thing about it fr/ any one who has tried it. I did notice that it was significantly lower proof--80--than most other gins.
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#72 Lan4Dawg

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 05:03 PM

The New Amsterdam was not bad but some what too "citrusy" for my tastes. It reminded me some of Tanqueray 10 but not quite as "refined" if you will. It would probably work better in a gin/tonic than a martini--at least for my tastes.
Fuss said she liked it better than Beefeater but not nearly as well as Broker's or our usual Bombay.
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#73 slkinsey

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 01:27 PM

Some more info from friends: Blackwood's gin should hit the NYC market sometime in September/October.
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#74 gethin

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 09:33 AM

Were any other UK based e-gulleteers at Bar06  yesterday and able to sample Gabriel Boudier's new Saffron Gin ?

I thought it pleasant enough but not overly exiting, closer to a young genever than to English gin. 

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Having been launched in the UK back in June, this is finally beginning to appear in retail outlets in London. I bought a bottle yesterday (at the Whisky Shop at Vinopolis if any other London based people want to track it down).

Having had a chance to taste it in normal conditions rather than the small,warm sample at the trade fair, I was more taken with it.

With tonic, it was somewhat reminiscent of Suze or Aveze , though not quite as bitter and with a really distinct saffron note. (I don't think this was just a colour thing, though the bright yellow might have influenced our perception that we were drinking gentian).

Served on the rocks it was both saffrony and citrussy (and didn't remind of Genever at all ). The flavours don't have much length, but it was certainly a pleasant drink .

Having taken the bottle to dinner with non cocktail obesssives, I wasn't able to play aound with it in cocktails, but I think it would work well with orange flavours (I'd have liked to try it out in an Orange Blossom for instance).

We did stick a decent slug of it in our mussles along with some white wine and it gave them a nice hint of saffron.

Anyone else been using it in cocktails ?



gethin

#75 KatieLoeb

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Posted 06 October 2006 - 09:07 PM

Interesting article about Bluecoat Gin in the local paper a few weeks back:

Bluecoat Aims for the Top Shelf

Katie M. Loeb
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#76 Dave O

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Posted 08 October 2006 - 06:53 AM

A friend of mine recently picked up some Zuidam Dry Gin and was kind enough to allow me to try it.

It made a good dry martini with Noilly Pratt vermouth.

Very lightly flavored, though, with more of a general spice flavor and not that strong a juniper accent.  Base spirit seemed relatively smooth.

We both thought it would be a good stepping stone gin for vodka martini drinkers.  Probably not much good for mixed drinks needing a stronger gin flavor, though.

~Erik

edit - add comment.

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I've been selling quite a bit of Zuidam Dry Gin, great appeal to the Bombay Sapphire Drinker, also light and has some nice citrus notes that make it accessable for some flavored vodka drinkers who had not really considered gin.

Dave

#77 Peter Green

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Posted 08 October 2006 - 08:40 AM

I've always felt that gin is something with more depth and possibilities than many of the other spirits. Just look at the list of ingredients on a Sapphire! there's a world of investigation out there for the curious, given the depth and breadth of botanicals that are now coming available.

Who's making their own gin at home now? There's the question. (Mind the revenooers!).

#78 Dangermonkey

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 09:48 AM

Actually if anyone is interseted I've done some reviews that answer some of the questions in the older posts about reviews of other gins at my website www.spiritsreview.com. I'm surprised that Kensington isn't more popular - it's aged in Bourbon barels for 2 years and makes a interesting martini and even a good gin and tonic (something I would not at first thought possible)They have a 3 year old version also but alas it is only in a fancy decanter at $180 a bottle and my curiosity (and money) only extends so far...
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#79 jmfangio

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 07:35 PM

I just picked up a bottle of Martin Miller's Reformed from BevMo yesterday - they were running a special on the 1.75 litre bottle for $27.99, so I thought I'd take a gamble based on the positive reviews I've seen and buy it instead of my usual go-to gin, Bombay Sapphire.

So far I've only tried it in a martini, but I have to say that I like it a lot. Very fruity and floral - to my palate, the juniper is very far in the background, and the fruitier botanicals dominate. I can't wait to try it in an Aviation, Jasmine, or Corpse Reviver #2.

Is this my new standard? No, but I like it enough to make sure that I keep it stocked in my bar.
"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

#80 Cole Danehower

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 02:57 PM

I just found this thread and wanted to respond to an earlier posting about Aviation Gin--not the cocktail called the Aviation but the gin product called Aviation Gin.

This is, to my taste, a superbly herby Dutch style gin (genever-reminiscent: juniper, coriander, cardamom, anise, lavender) gin produced in Portland, Oregon by House Spirits. Three like-minded guys have collaborated on its creation: Lee Medoff, Christian Krogstad, and Ryan Magarian. They also produce Medoyeff Vodka and have (or will soon have) a rum, an aquavit, and an Oregon pure malt whiskey. These guys make great stuff!!

I find the Aviation Gin makes an extra "spicy" martini. Because of the nature of the drink, it showcases the base alcohol's flavors, and with this gin you get a lot of herby aromatics, which gives the Martini a particular character (that may well not appeal to those who favor vodka-based Martinis). This gin also makes a wonderful Aviation cocktail (after which the product was named, of course). I have been to two diffeerent events where the Aviation Gin was mixed into different cocktails and served as accompaniments to multi-course meals designed to pair with the cocktails . . . what an eye-opening food/drink experience! In fact, this food pairing experience inspired us to start a cocktail column in our magazine)!

The Aviation Gin is in the market, but obviously is made in pretty small quantities and likely not available in non-Northwest or West Coast markets. But, it may still be orderable through some kind of liquor store system (local laws and all that may make it dfficult). Their website is at www.medoyeff.com.

And no, I have no economic connection with these guys at all. I just like them and their product and would like to see them succeed even more then thay have.

#81 eje

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 06:42 PM

Speaking of Aviation Gin, I've been meaning to give it a try.

Since it is supposed to be Dutch in style, I thought the thing to do would be to try it in Mr. Wondrich's Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail.

Fortunately, the bartender at The Alembic (flash heavy site) was not too busy early this evening, and tolerated my whimsy.

I used the "Super-Improved" receipt from the NY Times article...

---

IMPROVED HOLLAND GIN COCKTAIL
Adapted from David Wondrich

2 dashes Angostura bitters
1 scant teaspoon simple syrup*
1/2 teaspoon Maraschino Luxardo liqueur.
1 dash absinthe, or substitutes like Pernod or Absente
2 ounces Holland gin (also called genever gin; Zuidam is a good brand)
1 thinly cut lemon twist.

Combine the liquid ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well (or stir) and strain into a chilled martini glass. Twist the swatch of lemon peel over the top, rub it around the rim of the glass, and drop it in.

---

In any case, the Aviation Gin makes this a very floral, almost perfumey, cocktail. It rated a, "Wow, I'm going to have that for my shift cocktail," from the bartender.

Very different from the same cocktail with Boomsma gin.

I'm still not sure I got a handle on Aviation Gin as a product. I may have to try that spicy Martini Cole Danehower mentions.

Edited by eje, 27 October 2006 - 06:46 PM.

---
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#82 BTR

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 10:33 PM

Speaking of Aviation Gin, I've been meaning to give it a try.

Since it is supposed to be Dutch in style, I thought the thing to do would be to try it in Mr. Wondrich's Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail.

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Mr. Wondrich's?

Improved Brandy Cocktail
(Use ordinary bar-glass.)
Take 2 dashes Boker's (or Angostura) Bitters.
3 dashes gum syrup.
2 dashes Maraschino.
1 dash Absinthe.
1 small piece of the yellow rind of a lemon,
twisted to express the oil.
1 small wine-glass of brandy.

[...]
Improved Gin Cocktail.
Made the same way as the Improved Brandy Cocktail
substituting Holland or Old Tom gin for the
brandy.

Via Jerry Thomas.

#83 eje

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 12:17 PM

Mr. Wondrich's?
[...]

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Oh, sorry, I shouldn't credit him with it. My mistake.

Wondrich doesn't take credit for the Improved Holland Gin Cock-Tail in "Killer Cocktails", just sez, "In 'Gangs of New York' era Gotham, if there was one drink the sporty gents in the top hats were partial to, it was a Gin Cock-Tail. This 'improved' version dates to 1876."
---
Erik Ellestad
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#84 slkinsey

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 08:42 AM

FWIW, the recipe I have for the Improved Holland Gin Cock-Tail goes something like this:

<blockquote>2 oz : genever gin
1 tsp : 2:1 demerara simple syrup
1 tsp : maraschino liqueur
2 dashes : Peychaud's bitters

Mix in a glass with ice. Garnish with lemon twist.</blockquote>
Seems pretty different to me
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#85 eje

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 10:53 AM

It's interesting that the NY Times chose to publish a recipe that was closer to the Thomas' recipe than the one from Killer Cocktails.

Wonder if it was Dave's choice or the editors?
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#86 Splificator

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 08:44 AM

Wonder if it was Dave's choice or the editors?

Let's just say I advised them on it.
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#87 santo_grace

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 09:43 AM

Hello Everyone,

Looks like no one has mentioned North Shore Distillery gin. It's located just north of Chicago and is available in local stores (and via their websites). I finally tasted this a couple of months ago. The first thing that came to mind was black pepper and then cardamon. I really like the gin, which is kind of surprising since I'm not a huge fan of black pepper, but since I do really like cardamon, they balanced each other out. So far we've only had it in martini's (with a twist). We will continue to experiment.
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#88 kvltrede

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 08:04 PM

Speaking of Aviation Gin, I've been meaning to give it a try...  Since it is supposed to be Dutch in style, I thought the thing to do would be to try it in Mr. Wondrich's Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail....

IMPROVED HOLLAND GIN COCKTAIL
Adapted from David Wondrich

2 dashes Angostura bitters
1 scant teaspoon simple syrup*
1/2 teaspoon Maraschino Luxardo liqueur.
1 dash absinthe, or substitutes like Pernod or Absente
2 ounces Holland gin (also called genever gin; Zuidam is a good brand)
1 thinly cut lemon twist.

Combine the liquid ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well (or stir) and strain into a chilled martini glass. Twist the swatch of lemon peel over the top, rub it around the rim of the glass, and drop it in.

...Very different from the same cocktail with Boomsma gin....

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I've been meaning to give this one a try but I haven't managed to get past the Fancy Gin Cocktail on my list. The FGC requires two fewer ingredients and gets built in a rocks glass and apparently I'm just too lazy and too enamored of the FGC to pull two more bottles from the cabinet and grab the shaker from the cupboard.

Erik, how do you like the Boomsma? The only genever I've tried is the Zuidam. I have no idea where it stands in the genever hierarchy but it's incredibly delicious. Sam's just started carrying the young and old Boomsma genevers. They're a little cheaper than the Zuidam but I've heard both good and bad. What say you?

Kurt

PS. For me Peychaud's bitters is the only choice when making an Old Fashioned (or Fancy) Gin Cocktail. Angostura makes for a tasty drink but with Peychaud's the FGC is a classic.

Edited by kvltrede, 31 October 2006 - 08:13 PM.

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#89 eje

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 09:24 PM

[...]
Erik, how do you like the Boomsma?  The only genever I've tried is the Zuidam.  I have no idea where it stands in the genever hierarchy but it's incredibly delicious.  Sam's just started carrying the young and old Boomsma genevers.  They're a little cheaper than the Zuidam but I've heard both good and bad.  What say you?
[...]

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Kurt,

I'm in a similar boat. The only Zuidam we get here is their London Dry, which I think is an OK dry gin. Very subtle and vodka-ish. The only Genevers I've tried are the Boomsmas. The Boomsmas seem like fine gins. Nothing to get terribly excited about, but, ok for the price. Wish I had something to compare them to!

I did see a dusty row of DeKuyper Genever at a liquor store in Burlingame the other day, and am hoping to return and get a bottle some time soon.

Unfortunately, there is the small matter of a certain newly released 2006 Antique Collection which is calling my name much more strongly...
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#90 donbert

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 04:10 AM

I just tried a couple Aviations with the Aviation Gin and have to say that I'm not that impressed. I tried a few different recipes with and without creme de violette but none struck me as being any better than other gins I've used. I'll stick to the Miller's Westbourne Strength for my Aviations (since I can't get the Plymouth Navy Strength here in the US).