Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Dutch Cooking (2005-2006)


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
578 replies to this topic

#331 Cadbury

Cadbury
  • participating member
  • 190 posts
  • Location:Western Australia

Posted 06 January 2006 - 07:31 AM

Cadbury, what was the temperature of your oven?  I'd love to try the Oliebollen, but hate the mess that deep frying makes.

View Post


I had the oven at about 190 C. I must add that the mixture had risen and been punched down a number of times during the process of frying and I also let it rise again before cooking. I used two dessertspoons to get the mixture into the tins as it's quite sticky. They didn't take long to cook, maybe 15 minutes, I didn't keep an eye on the clock so I'm not sure. Goodluck. (They're nice cut in half with butter :shock: )

#332 I_call_the_duck

I_call_the_duck
  • participating member
  • 1,243 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia via New York

Posted 06 January 2006 - 07:43 AM

Thanks, Cadbury.

And Klary, I love this thread. I can't wait to try some of these dishes. Thanks for sharing it with us.
Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

#333 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 06 January 2006 - 08:51 AM

Hey, maybe you could also do them in an aebleskiver pan? That way they'd get some oil, but not so much. I'm another deepfry-ophobic, although those bitterballen and the olieballen might force me to get over that.

#334 Cadbury

Cadbury
  • participating member
  • 190 posts
  • Location:Western Australia

Posted 09 January 2006 - 08:49 PM

Hey, maybe you could also do them in an aebleskiver pan?  That way they'd get some oil, but not so much.  I'm another deepfry-ophobic, although those bitterballen and the olieballen might force me to get over that.

View Post


I'm not sure that it would work too well. The mixture is really sticky and I would think it would be difficult to fill the hot pan quickly enough. Maybe you should give it a try and let us know. They are rather delicious. :smile:

#335 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 11 January 2006 - 05:13 AM

Oliebollen - with a twist.

I made Oliebollen this morning.  I made half the amount Klary gave in her recipe (with the increased measure of milk).  Having made several dozen spring rolls last night for dinner, after cooking about 20 of these delicious morsels, I had had enough of deep frying in my hot kitchen (35 C outside today, 27 C inside).
I still had a lot of batter left so I got creative, filling large muffin tins with the mixture and cooking them in the oven.  The result was a very light, sweet bun.  The oliebollen and the "buns" were given the "thumbs up" by my husband.

View Post



Ok I have to admit I became a little obsessed with this idea! I just had to try it myself! So I did. I used the recipe for Oliebollen qouted above, roughly quartered, so the proportions ended up like this (this made 12 buns):
250 grams of flour
250 ml. warm milk
half a sachet yeast
50 grams soft white sugar
50 grams melted butter
1 egg
flavorings: about half a small apple, chopped finely, a handful of currants, a handful of candied citron.
Dough was left to rise until doubled, then punched down, and left to rise again.

I set my oven to about 190 C. I greased 2 6-hole muffinpans with sunfloweroil, rather liberally, so as not to take the oil comletely out of the oliebollen :smile: I heated the muffintins in the oven for a couple of minutes until the oil was hot and then filled them one at the time. Baked for about 10 minutes. I brushed them with milk when they came out of the oven, and sprinkled with soft sugar.

Voila.. the practically oil-less oliebol! I'm not sure what we should call this.. any ideas?

Posted Image

Posted Image

They are fantastic. They are not the same as the real thing, ofcourse, because they don't have the crispy crunchy crust that you can only get from deepfrying. But they are so light, fluffy, and their taste is definitely that of the real thing! I can imagine that this is something you can make much more often, it's easy and fast, and ofcourse it's healthier.
Thank you Cadbury for this creative contribution to Dutch Cooking! this will be in my repertoire from now on!

Edited by Chufi, 11 January 2006 - 05:49 AM.


#336 Kevin72

Kevin72
  • society donor
  • 2,576 posts

Posted 11 January 2006 - 05:30 AM

What's the Dutch word for baked?

"(Baked)bollen"?

#337 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 11 January 2006 - 05:36 AM

What's the Dutch word for baked?

"(Baked)bollen"?

View Post


to bake = bakken.
So yes, bakbollen would be a good description.. :smile:
Bakken actually can also be used to describe frying (like in sautepan.) Language is complicated..

edited to add:
or, ovenbollen.. (you know like regular fries versus ovenfries..)

Edited by Chufi, 11 January 2006 - 05:51 AM.


#338 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 11 January 2006 - 08:53 AM

Those are beautiful! Did you turn them as they baked, to achieve that round shape? Or is that a camera-angle illusion?

#339 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 11 January 2006 - 09:08 AM

  Or is that a camera-angle illusion?

View Post


I think so.. they look like muffins, with a really round and raised top. I did not turn them as they baked, I think that would have affected the rise too much.

#340 Badiane

Badiane
  • participating member
  • 661 posts
  • Location:Chilliwack, BC

Posted 11 January 2006 - 11:44 AM

They look fantastic...I personally would call them 'bollengebakken'...but hey, my sole experience cooking dutch food is 3 months making massive amounts of Nasi Goreng in a Dutch Deli/Produce shop. I only know about 10 dutch words - and 5 of those are rather rude.

I am going to do the butter braised beef this weekend...I keep having to put it off, much to my chagrin.
Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

#341 Cadbury

Cadbury
  • participating member
  • 190 posts
  • Location:Western Australia

Posted 12 January 2006 - 01:03 AM

They look great Klary. Maybe they should be called Nieuwjaar Muffins (what's Dutch for muffin? :unsure: My dictionary is way too old for such a word.)

#342 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 13 January 2006 - 02:27 AM

(what's Dutch for muffin?  :unsure:  My dictionary is way too old for such a word.)

View Post


Muffin :smile:

#343 suzilightning

suzilightning
  • participating member
  • 2,722 posts
  • Location:NW NJ

Posted 14 January 2006 - 10:34 AM

finally made the butter braised beef(though with olive oil not butter so johnnybird could eat it). what a wonderfully simple but elegant dish. i had gotten a piece of beef from my butcher that i cut in half then cooked. we had half the meat with garlic mashed potatoes and green beans. i took the rest, cut it into smallish pieces, resurrected some beef gravy from the freezer and cooked up a some potatoes, carrots, and onions then made a truly great stew.... thanks klary!
The first zucchini I ever saw I killed it with a hoe.

Joe Gould
Monstrous Depravity (1963)

#344 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 14 January 2006 - 08:55 PM

Voila.. the practically oil-less oliebol! I'm not sure what we should call this.. any ideas?


Non-oilybollen? :rolleyes:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#345 kaneel

kaneel
  • participating member
  • 177 posts
  • Location:Houston

Posted 15 January 2006 - 11:17 AM

Lekkere bollen!!

#346 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 18 January 2006 - 04:25 AM

Dutch split pea soup - Erwtensoep, or, as it's affectionately called, snert

I know I already posted a picture of this somewhere upthread, but as I was making the soup on monday, I felt it was impossible not to share this with you. Erwtensoep is a real Dutch classic - simple, rustic winter comfortfood.

What you need for a very large pan of soup:

Posted Image

Posted Image

500 grams splitpeas
Fresh pork. You can use various types, a hamhock, pigs feet, ribs. Here I have over a kilo of porkribs, and because I felt they were maybe not meaty enough, some extra pork shoulder, chopped up.
Salt pork. A small piece of salt, not smoked pork.
Smoked pork. Smoked pork sausages are traditional, but bits of smoked bacon could be added as well.

Vegetables. Here I have a couple of large potatoes, 2 fat leeks, 3 onions, 2 large carrots, a small celeriac, half a bunch of parsley and half a bunch of celery leaves. You don't have to be too precise about the amounts.

Now, a couple of points that will transform ordinary splitpea soup into the sublime Dutch snert..
- Chop up your vegetables fairly small. You want them to dissolve into the soup.
- Don't add the smoked meats until at the very end, or your soup will get a harsh and too smokey flavor. Snert is supposed to have a very mellow, sweet flavor, with the contrast of little bits of smokey meat.
- Most recipes tell you to use 2 litres of water for 500 grams of splitpeas. This gives you a thick soup fast, but not the complex flavor you're after. So I use 4 litres of water for 500 grams of peas. I simmer the soup for 2 hours covered, and then for about 2 hours more, uncovered.
- Long, slow simmering is what gives this soup it's character. There are no shortcuts! During the latter part of the cooking, when the soup is getting thicker, it needs a lot of attention. I't burns easily and stick to the pan. You will need to stir it and scrape the pan at least every 15-20 minutes.
- Don't eat it the day you made it. Really. This is going to be hard, because it smells so good, but trust me, tomorrow it will be even better.

Posted Image

So. Throw everything, except the smoked meat, into the pot with 4 litres of water and a couple of bayleaves. Add salt and pepper, easy on the salt if you're using a large piece of salt pork.. Bring to the boil. While it comes to the boil, you can spoon off some of the scum that rises to the surface, but to be honest I'm not very thorough about that...

When it boils, lower the heat and make sure this is simmering slowly. Simmer for about 2 hours, stirring often. Uncover the pan and simmer for a couple more hours, stirring even more often. The house is smelling heavenly by now.

Take the meat out and separate meat and bones. This should be really easy.
Posted Image
Shred the meat, get rid of the very fatty bits, and put the meat back into the pan. Slice your soked meats and put them in the soup. Simmer for about 30 minutes more. It should look like this
Posted Image
taste it and add more salt and pepper if you think it needs it.

Let it cool. As it cools, it becomes so firms that a spoon will stand up straight..
Posted Image


Next day, serve!
Posted Image
I don't know if you can see it in this picture, but the texture has changed overnight, and the soup has become even more smooth and thick.

edited to add: I know this does not look pretty.. but if only you could smell it.. as we were eating it yesterday my husband said, I wish you could put this smell on the internet for those EGulleters.. :biggrin:

Edited by Chufi, 18 January 2006 - 04:37 AM.


#347 azureus

azureus
  • participating member
  • 209 posts
  • Location:Eastern South Dakota

Posted 18 January 2006 - 05:33 AM

Dutch split pea soup - Erwtensoep, or, as it's affectionately called, snert


Posted Image
I don't know if you can see it in this picture, but the texture has changed overnight, and the soup has become even more smooth and thick.

edited to add: I know this does not look pretty.. but if only you could smell it.. as we were eating it yesterday my husband said, I wish you could put this smell on the internet for those EGulleters..  :biggrin:

View Post


No, it doesn't look lovely at all. But after all of the delicious Dutch cooking that you've iintroduced to us, we can trust you, Chufi. I can definitely see the textural change. The soup on the second day looks almost glossy. Do the leftovers freeze well?

April
One cantaloupe is ripe and lush/Another's green, another's mush/I'd buy a lot more cantaloupe/ If I possessed a fluoroscope. Ogden Nash

#348 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:14 AM

No, it doesn't look lovely at all.  But after all of the delicious Dutch cooking that you've iintroduced to us, we can trust you, Chufi.  I can definitely see the textural change.  The soup on the second day looks almost glossy.  Do the leftovers freeze well? 

April

View Post


Thanks April! I guess it's a good thing then that I did not start out with this one :biggrin:

Yes, it freezes well. I put several containers in the freezer.. ready and waiting for the cold and rainy days of February. Ofcourse you could make less but it does not seem to make sense when something cooks for such a long time, to make only a small pan.

#349 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:20 AM


No, it doesn't look lovely at all.  But after all of the delicious Dutch cooking that you've iintroduced to us, we can trust you, Chufi.  I can definitely see the textural change.  The soup on the second day looks almost glossy.  Do the leftovers freeze well? 

April

View Post


Thanks April! I guess it's a good thing then that I did not start out with this one :biggrin:

Yes, it freezes well. I put several containers in the freezer.. ready and waiting for the cold and rainy days of February. Ofcourse you could make less but it does not seem to make sense when something cooks for such a long time, to make only a small pan.

View Post



As an aside, Klary, I wish I could read your blogspot blog( I can't read dutch though), the tart looks absolutly wonderful.

#350 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:30 AM

As an aside, Klary, I wish I could read your blogspot blog( I can't read dutch though), the tart looks absolutly wonderful.

View Post


well, it's in RecipeGullet. here so even if you can't read my story, you can make it :smile:

that would be a very undutch recipe indeed. Witlof - belgian endive - is a favorite Dutch vegetable, but usually boiled to death :shock:

#351 Jensen

Jensen
  • participating member
  • 2,097 posts
  • Location:Sacramento but I'd rather be in Victoria!

Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:57 AM


As an aside, Klary, I wish I could read your blogspot blog( I can't read dutch though), the tart looks absolutly wonderful.

View Post


well, it's in RecipeGullet. here so even if you can't read my story, you can make it :smile:

that would be a very undutch recipe indeed. Witlof - belgian endive - is a favorite Dutch vegetable, but usually boiled to death :shock:

View Post



I've made a similar dish using fresh onions and Serrano ham (photos on my food blog here).

Randi, the key to reading Dutch is to try and read it aloud. Unlike German (which looks like English but sounds completely different), Dutch looks completely different from English but sounds quite a bit alike.

After travelling all over the US and also in Western Europe, I can honestly say that I understood most people in the Netherlands (speaking Dutch) better than I could understand some of the people I met in Arkansas (supposedly speaking English). :blink:

#352 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 18 January 2006 - 11:40 AM


As an aside, Klary, I wish I could read your blogspot blog( I can't read dutch though), the tart looks absolutly wonderful.

View Post


well, it's in RecipeGullet. here so even if you can't read my story, you can make it :smile:

that would be a very undutch recipe indeed. Witlof - belgian endive - is a favorite Dutch vegetable, but usually boiled to death :shock:

View Post



I've made a similar dish using fresh onions and Serrano ham (photos on my food blog here).

Randi, the key to reading Dutch is to try and read it aloud. Unlike German (which looks like English but sounds completely different), Dutch looks completely different from English but sounds quite a bit alike.

After travelling all over the US and also in Western Europe, I can honestly say that I understood most people in the Netherlands (speaking Dutch) better than I could understand some of the people I met in Arkansas (supposedly speaking English). :blink:

View Post



Ok, just did that( you should have seen the way my dogs were looking at me). I only could make out. "pasta" and "apartment" LOLOLOL. I'll just stick with looking at the pictures.

#353 Jensen

Jensen
  • participating member
  • 2,097 posts
  • Location:Sacramento but I'd rather be in Victoria!

Posted 18 January 2006 - 12:01 PM

Ok, just did that( you should have seen the way my dogs were looking at me).  I only could make out. "pasta" and "apartment" LOLOLOL.  I'll just stick with looking at the pictures.

View Post



Oh, you're not trying hard enough!

From the witlof entry, there are:

avontuur ... adventure
kookboeken ... cookbook(s) -- I think the -en ending might be plural
supermarkt .... supermarket
in het supermarkt-neonlicht ... in the neon (fluorescent?) lights of the supermarket
koelkast ... fridge (koel=cool; kast=case)
pijn (from pijnboompitten) ... pine (pitten sounds like "pits" to me, when combined with "pijn" means pinenuts)

And almost an entire paragraph!

"Ik heb mijn kraakverse witlof, wat heb ik verder nodig? Er is altijd bladerdeeg in de vriezer, een restje kaas in de koelkast, pijnboompitten en gedroogde kruiden in het keukenkastje. Een half uur later staat de witloftaart met blauwe kaas op tafel."

"I have my [kraakverse] endive, what can I do with it? There is [altijd] pastry in the freezer, a [bit of??] cheese in the refrigerator, pinenuts and dried herbs in the kitchen cupboards. A half hour later the endive tart with blue cheese stood on the table."

I will confess that some knowledge of German has been helpful. Kaas in Dutch looks an awful lot like Käse in German (and only a little bit like "casein" from English).

Of course, Klary will probably chime in here and tell me I'm full of shit... :laugh:

#354 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 18 January 2006 - 03:01 PM

Jen, I'm speechless (in both languanges...) you're very good!! :smile:

vers = fresh, kraakvers = something like squeaky fresh, very very fresh.

BTW I sometimes feel that the Dutch language is being taken over by English words. Esepcially in the foodbusiness.. everything is referred to as light, fresh, easy, etc. An english speaking person would feel right at home in our supermarkets!

#355 Jensen

Jensen
  • participating member
  • 2,097 posts
  • Location:Sacramento but I'd rather be in Victoria!

Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:24 PM

Jen, I'm speechless (in both languanges...) you're very good!! :smile:



I think I relied a lot on knowledge of German though. Maybe half that and half English.

BTW I sometimes feel that the Dutch language is being taken over by English words. Esepcially in the foodbusiness.. everything is referred to as light, fresh, easy, etc. An english speaking person would feel right at home in our supermarkets!

View Post



There was an article in Der Spiegel (the English version, of course) that talked about that in Germany too--again, especially in the food area. I think the article talked mostly about restaurants, etc., in that regard.

And back to Dutch cooking, we had stamppot for dinner tonight. It's really become a family favourite. Thank you!

#356 azureus

azureus
  • participating member
  • 209 posts
  • Location:Eastern South Dakota

Posted 20 January 2006 - 09:42 AM

Klary,

As penance for insulting your Erwtensoep, :sad: I present to you some Dutch-American pastries that I purchased yesterday at a local shop:

Posted Image

The De Hoek Gift Shop opened late last year in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. I didn't visit it right away, as I hadn't realized that they had a tiny bakery in the back. The whole De Hoek family runs the shop and bakes all of their own pastries. The family moved to South Dakota from Pella, Iowa. Pella was settled by Dutch immigrants in the mid-1800s, and the townsfolk are very proud of their heritage. They have a huge tulip festival there every year.

But back to the pastries: On the left is a puff pastry filled with almond paste, it was labeled "Almond Pillow"; the cookies I think are speculaas, made at the bakery; second from the right is an apricot scone; and on the far right is a slice of what they were calling an almond tart. I think that it's made from two layers of dough similar to your Gevulde koeken, with a thick layer of almond paste in the middle. It's very addictive, and quite rich.

I've been in a few times now, and the family is alway very friendly and happy to answer all of my questions. They are interested to know if scones are popular in the Netherlands. They said that according to tradition, the Dutch invented scones, but that they were called something like "skonbrot" (sorry about my spelling). The joke is that the English couldn't pronounce it properly, so they changed the name to scones. True or not, they had great fun relating the story.

Now, I'm going to go sample my pastries. It was difficult to leave them alone long enough to photograph them!

April
One cantaloupe is ripe and lush/Another's green, another's mush/I'd buy a lot more cantaloupe/ If I possessed a fluoroscope. Ogden Nash

#357 Jensen

Jensen
  • participating member
  • 2,097 posts
  • Location:Sacramento but I'd rather be in Victoria!

Posted 20 January 2006 - 10:10 AM

They said that according to tradition, the Dutch invented scones, but that they were called something like "skonbrot" (sorry about my spelling).  The joke is that the English couldn't pronounce it properly, so they changed the name to scones.  True or not, they had great fun relating the story.

View Post



I guess the Scots borrowed the name for their coronation stone (palace and town) too. I can definitely see the attraction of naming such an illustrious part of their heritage after a Dutch bread. :raz:

#358 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 20 January 2006 - 01:12 PM

Posted Image

View Post


April.. thank you so much for making the HUGE sacrifice to go to that shop and buy those pastries.. I really appreciate it :biggrin:
Yes, that's definitely speculaas. The almond pillow is sold over here as "amandelbroodje". The almond tart on the right does indeed look like the gevulde koeken, only the almond paste seems to be much darker, maybe there were spices in it?
I'm stunned about the scone story. I googled around a bit and looked through my Dutch pastry books but I can't find anything about that. Scones are thought of as something typically English over here, and it's kind of hard to find them.
If you're ever in that shop again, would you mind asking how they learned about that?

#359 Pontormo

Pontormo
  • participating member
  • 2,589 posts

Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:32 AM

Klary: I have just gotten around to exploring this thread and have by no means read through it all.

Let me say, first, that your skills as a baker really impress me.

Second, I should have suspected this from something you initiated long ago to introduce us to unusual vegetables, one of the first threads I read on eGullet. Nonetheless, you have really helped me correct prejudices. All friends returning from research or travel through The Netherlands have ever spoken about were french fries with mayo!

I find your own newly acquired, retrospective appreciation for traditional foods a real incentive for learning more about culinary traditions that are unfamiliar to me. It's a kind of personal change in attitude that many of us experience once we have distinguished ourselves from our parents and proven how original and creative we are.

The ginger cake featured in the very first entries is something I HAVE to try since I love crystalized ginger; candied ginger in syrup has just started to appear on local supermarket shelves. As someone who adores split pea soup--and celery root--I find your two versions are also inspirational.

Finally, though, I have to ask about those intriguing pears that turn red like quinces when cooked. Do you know how wide-spread they are, that is, if they are grown any place other than The Netherlands? What is their official name in Dutch?
"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#360 Kim D

Kim D
  • participating member
  • 252 posts
  • Location:The North Fork

Posted 23 January 2006 - 11:54 AM

I made the beef braised in butter a week or so ago. I thought it would be nice. But nothing more than that.

I was wrong.

When the meat was done cooking, I took it out of the butter sauce. I riced my potatoes directly into the pan so I wouldn't miss any of the butter and brown bits. Poured in some warmed heavy cream. Mixed it up, took a bite, and just about swooned.

The meat did taste of butter. When I first read the recipe, the thought of beef tasting of butter didn't do much for me. But when I tasted it, all of a sudden, beef tasting of butter did something for me. :wub:

My husband told a Dutch co-worker about our meal.

His reply?

"Grandma food."

:laugh:

I'll be making it again. Just don't call me Grandma. :raz: :huh: :blink:
If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe. - Carl Sagan