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Zabaglione


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27 replies to this topic

#1 ksaw29

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Posted 22 October 2005 - 06:18 PM

Ok ladies and gents, I want to know your favourite way to do this delish treat? :wub: I made it last night for someone who hadn't had it in 10 years. They said it was superb. However, he was telling me others ways in which he liked it (I just made it with yolks, sugar, espresso, vanilla and chocolate shavings) that I wasn't familiar with.
This is where knowledge is power. You share your variation with the receipe and we all will grow.
Thanks a mill' :raz:

#2 fatmat

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 09:49 AM

Sugar, egg yolks and a fortified wine, preferably marsala (for genuine zab). I also use vermouth (white or rosso), served with a savoirdi biscuit or two.

This is my favourite desert in the world. I can still remember the first time I tried it as a child. Every time I eat it it takes me back to that moment.

#3 chiantiglace

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 12:59 PM

Zabaglione is just the Italian version of Sabayon using Italian wine instead of french.

Of course these traditions don't apply too much anymore. People make sabayon with all variations of things these days.
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#4 ksaw29

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 10:39 PM

I've never tried Sabayon. I googled the recipe and noticed most of the cooking is done by microwave.

#5 Ling

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 02:28 AM

^I've never seen it done in a microwave! :shock: Always a double boiler...is it not?

#6 Marco_Polo

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 02:42 AM

^I've never seen it done in a microwave!  :shock: Always a double boiler...is it not?

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In a microwave? Surely you jest?!

Half the fun of making zabaglione is the theatricality of whipping up a frothy panful, preferably in front of your guests, the syncopated clatter of whisk against pan adding a unique cacophany to the anticipated enjoyment of this sweet and rich custardy pudding that always seems — and ought to taste — special, in part no doubt due to all the kerfuffle to make it.

When we make zabaglione. we use a copper dome-shaped basin held over a pan of just simmering water. Though Marsala may well be the classic wine to use, we've enjoyed examples made with Barbera and, as in the photo below, with delicately fragrant Moscato. A nutty Amontillado would be interesting, I'm sure.

Here's the maestro Cesare Giaccone whipping up a pan on a recent visit to Piedmont (as reported on another thread). Note that such is Cesare's deft skill that he eschews using a double boiler, working directly over a flame that is quite high - this takes skill - and incredible speed of hand! His 'zabag', served over a pear, poached I think in the same exquisite Moscato wine, was majesterial.

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Edited by Marco_Polo, 25 October 2005 - 03:13 AM.


#7 Ling

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 02:57 AM

^It was ksaw doing the jesting. :wink: I would NEVER desecrate zabaglione by doing it in the microwave! :smile:

#8 Redsugar

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 08:43 AM

I notice Chef Giaccone holding the pan directly over the flame. (Does he measure the Marsala in the eggshells?) The particular attentiveness required is to hold the pan as steadily as possible, except at crucial moments when it needs to be veered from the heat in order to decellerate the emulsification. It’s probably advisable for most people making zabaglione the first few times, to use a double-boiler (even a makeshift one).

I’m quite unswervingly traditional making zabaglione – the general ratio is 6 large free-range egg yolks, about ¼ cup sieved (light) organic sugar, and 2 fl. oz. Marsala.

As fatmat noted, above, savoiardi biscuits (the Italian version of biscuits à la cuillière, used in authentic tiramisú). Langues de chat or zaletti (cornmeal cookies with currants) are delectable to consume with the froth, as well, along with fresh-cut fruit. And, of course, serving it in stemmed glassware maintains an indispensably elegant presentation.

Someday, I'll splurge on the purchase of a 6-cup copper sabayon pot.
"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

#9 ksaw29

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 10:28 PM

^I've never seen it done in a microwave!  :shock: Always a double boiler...is it not?

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No no no my friends. I would NEVER do zabaglione in a microwave :blink: . I googled the recipe for Sabayon and noticed at least 2 receipes instructed the microwave cooking process. Destroy my favorite treat like this? I think not :rolleyes:

#10 ksaw29

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 10:36 PM

This was the link I found http://www.gov.mb.ca...2/cse01s24.html

I am very familiar with the double boiler method. I love putting in the elbow grease.

#11 UnConundrum

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 11:44 AM

Has anyone tried the ISI version, using a redi-whip whipper and not cooking?

#12 ksaw29

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 02:30 PM

Has anyone tried the ISI version, using a redi-whip whipper and not cooking?

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Never have. I wasn't aware of this method. Care to share?

#13 Zach Holmes

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 02:40 PM

I notice Chef Giaccone holding the pan directly over the flame. (Does he measure the Marsala in the eggshells?)  The particular attentiveness required is to hold the pan as steadily as possible, except at crucial moments when it needs to be veered from the heat in order to decellerate the emulsification.  It’s probably advisable for most people making zabaglione the first few times, to use a double-boiler (even a makeshift one).


I usually do sabayon directly over flame, along with hollandaise, but then again, i laugh in the face of danger! :cool: also got a great copper pan at work that does a great job (bowl with handle, wok style)

Edited by Zach Holmes, 28 October 2005 - 02:41 PM.


#14 UnConundrum

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 06:15 PM

ISI recipe for Zabaglione

4 egg yolks (pasturized)
7 oz. heavy cream
5 oz Marsala or white wine
6 Tbls powdered sugar
1 - 2 oz cognac

Stir all ingredients until the sugar is completely disolved.
Pour the mixture into ISI whipper.
Screw in one charger and shake vigorously.

Serve well chilled with amaretti as garnish.



But I haven't tried it. I was wondering if anyone else has.

#15 chiantiglace

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 08:19 PM

omg, just put a bowl over some simmereing water.

Whisk together 1 yolk 1oz sugar and 2 oz wine. With that ratio you cant go wrong.

Beat it to hell and until its hot to the touch and your good. Is it so hard we have to find alternate methods. Takes me 5 minutes or less.
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#16 ksaw29

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 10:00 PM

omg, just put a bowl over some simmereing water.

Whisk together 1 yolk 1oz sugar and 2 oz wine.  With that ratio you cant go wrong.

Beat it to hell and until its hot to the touch and your good.  Is it so hard we have to find alternate methods.  Takes me 5 minutes or less.

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Why would you think it's hard for us? We wouldn't have wonderful variations to other recipes if people were scared to experiment. It's easy, one leg at a time outside the box.
That said, I haven't seen recipes as yet. Let's fire it up :wink:

#17 Ms Neato

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 11:26 PM

I make it with limoncello instead of Marsala.

(No specific recipe (: )

#18 takomabaker

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 11:43 AM

I've been known to use muscat.

#19 Carrot Top

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 01:07 PM

Let me swing my leg right up over the side of the box and admit that I used to swirl a bit of chocolate ganache into the finished zabalione - not till blended simply marbleized.

Sacreligous? Perhaps.

Adored? Definitely.

Edited by Carrot Top, 03 November 2005 - 01:07 PM.


#20 ksaw29

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 03:52 PM

Let me swing my leg right up over the side of the box and admit that I used to swirl a bit of chocolate ganache into the finished zabalione - not till blended simply marbleized.

Sacreligous? Perhaps.

Adored? Definitely.

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Too cute :biggrin: I usually just drop a dallop in the bottom of the glass. Marbeling is a great presentation.

#21 Mottmott

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 04:12 PM

Thanks for this thread. :wub: Oh, you've all reminded me of the drama of it. I will regale my gd with it next time she comes to cook with me. She loves it when I make whipped cream by hand; she'll flip for the zabaglione! Now what will I put it on for her. What's your favorite? I can't encourage her to simply eat it by the spoonful!
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#22 albiston

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 01:32 AM

Zabaglione is just the Italian version of Sabayon using Italian wine instead of french.

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Or rather, Sabayon is the French version of Zabaglione, which is an Italian dessert. You don't have to take my word for it though :wink: , those lovable French rascals writing Larousse Gastronomique seem to think it is so, and I am prone to believe them.

I'm a fan of zabaglione made Piedmontese style, i.e. with moscato d'Asti as Marc mentioned before. Personally I find it to be lighter and more refreshing than that made with marsala. Savoiardi biscuits are great with that, but I'd avtually dunk any fruit, cookie or biscuit in zabaglione without an ounce of guilt... and lick the bowl afterwards.

An interesting twist on the classic recipe is savory zabaglione. One could argue if it is still zabaglione at all, though the technique is the same: the wine is substituted with stock, and the sugar either left out or replaced with cheese. Chef Corelli, who was the guest of a chat in the Italy forum some time ago, serves a delicious cheese-less game risotto with a parmesan zanaglione on the side: take a fork of risotto and dunk it in the zabaglione...creamy risotto heavan.
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#23 Ore

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 03:06 AM

hehe -

I remember using the sweet wines from Pantelleria (Sicily) - it was one yolk, one spoon of sugar and one spoon of wine - we would do it over the pasta cooker (always steaming!).

In another place we had set up a make shift double boiler - the water slowly simmering in a pot and then a plastic bowl, protected by a towel, and a make shift cover - slip the electric beater into this gadget and try to cover it - let the mixer do all the work while you are slaving away at something else.

(both were italian experiences)



Ore

#24 Adam Balic

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 04:35 AM

Zabaglione is just the Italian version of Sabayon using Italian wine instead of french.

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Or rather, Sabayon is the French version of Zabaglione, which is an Italian dessert. You don't have to take my word for it though :wink: , those lovable French rascals writing Larousse Gastronomique seem to think it is so, and I am prone to believe them.



An interesting twist on the classic recipe is savory zabaglione. One could argue if it is still zabaglione at all, though the technique is the same: the wine is substituted with stock, and the sugar either left out or replaced with cheese. Chef Corelli, who was the guest of a chat in the Italy forum some time ago, serves a delicious cheese-less game risotto with a parmesan zanaglione on the side: take a fork of risotto and dunk it in the zabaglione...creamy risotto heavan.

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The savoury versions most likely pre-date the "modern" sweet types. They all belong to a class of products called "Caudles" (which comes from the Medieval Latin via Old French for "Hot Drink"). They were not all thickened with eggs (especially during lent of fish days), but many were and often they were poured into cooked savoury pies.

Here is a 15th century English recipe which is similar to the modern zabaglione, except that the egg whites are not added.

Cawdelle Ferry.

Take yolkys of eyroun Raw, y-tryid fro the whyte; than take gode wyne, and warme it on the potte on a fayre Fyre, an caste ther-on yolkys, and stere it wyl, but let it nowt boyle tylle it be thikke; and caste ther-to Sugre, Safroun, & Salt, Maces, Gelofres, an Galyngale y-grounde smal, & flowre of Canelle; & whan thow dressyst yn, caste blanke pouder ther-on.

[Stir the egg yolks with wine on heat, do not let it boil. When it thickens add sugar and spice, garnish with sweet spice]

#25 Chris Amirault

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 04:44 AM

Great thread -- and thanks as ever, Adam, for the dip into history!

To chiantiglace's ratios, which I use at home with marsala --

Whisk together 1 yolk 1oz sugar and 2 oz wine.  With that ratio you cant go wrong.

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-- I can only add lemon zest. I think I first got that from Craig Clairborne in the NYT Cookbook.
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#26 albiston

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 04:52 AM

Adam, thanks for the intriguing historical information. It's great to know we can rely on your knowledge of Medieval cooking for info :smile: .

I wonder if modern day chefs who serve savory zabaglione know of those origins or if they re-invented "caudles" taking inspiration from the sweet version.

History goes round and round.... in the kitchen too.
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#27 Adam Balic

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 05:04 AM

Most likely not, but I don't think that it really matters. Also the critical thing for the Zabaglione that sets it self apart from other caudle saues is the incorporation of egg whites, so it is a slightly different products.

For instance this 16th century recipe is a sauce for Chicken.

...take the yolkes of syxe egges and a
dyshfull of vergis and drawe them through a
streyner and sette it upon a chafingdyshe,
than drawe youre baken chekins and put ther
to this foresayde egges and vergys and thus
serve them hoate.

Rather then being a savory zabaglione, it is closer to a Greek avgolemono sauce. But yes, very few ideas are originaly, however, it is what you can do with the concept that counts.

#28 kingblah

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 07:29 AM

Has anyone tried the ISI version, using a redi-whip whipper and not cooking?

 I tried it yesterday and it was mediocre. More like a regular (albeit boozy) whipped cream. Definitely no substitute for the real thing. Was curious what it might be like if it was heated in the whipper.