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Korean Home Cooking


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326 replies to this topic

#61 SheenaGreena

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:41 PM

chryz, your dweng jang jigae looks like a delicious curry!!! I like that you put lots of veggies in it


I like to make mine with anchovies, cubed firm tofu, zuchini, whole cloves of garlic, all garnished with sliced green onions. Its best when you have chunky homemade dweng jang because the soy beans are whole and add a nice surprise.

Does anyone put meat in their dweng jang (other than anchovies for stock)?


One of my favorite home cooked meals is karl gook su (knife noodles) with lots of potatos and in the winter time I like to make oxtail stock/soup and just eat it with rice and fresh green onions, although making oxtail stock takes 2 days to make.
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#62 jeanki

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 12:53 PM

I love Korean food, but haven't tried making any dish yet.  I particularly love Japchae (or Chapchae) and Kimchichigae (Kimchi soup).  I'd probably the recipes you have here.

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I make a quick and easy version of kimchi jigae at home.

First I dice some pork loin and marinate it in soy sauce, sesame oil, and aji-mirin.
Then I crush some garlic or chop it finely. I saute the garlic in canola oil and then add the pork loin and saute until it just turns almost brown (about 4-5 minutes) and then add about a cup to two cups of kimchi (well-fermented/not newly bought), and saute the whole damn thing. (You can also add some chopped onion too.) Then I add a long dash of more aji-mirin, a dash of soy sauce and sesame oil and saute some more, about 3-5 minutes total. (I think sauteing the kimchee adds another level of richness to the overall taste.) Then I add about 2 cups of water. I let the soup come to a boil and then I simmer it for about 10-15 minutes. When it's almost done, I add a box worth of diced soft tofu and cook for about 2 minutes more. At the end I finish with some chopped scallions and black pepper.

It's not necessarily the most authentic way to make it (the pork I use is fairly lean, and the aji-mirin is my own secret ingredient), but it's good enough for my kimchi jigae cravings. Enjoy!

Edited by jeanki, 08 September 2006 - 12:56 PM.


#63 torakris

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 02:57 PM

I love the combination of kimchi and mirin! I make a really good kimchi fried rice and my secret is a splash of mirin at the end. I also add it to my kimchi chigae and kimchi and pork stirfries.
Now that my 5 year old has learned to eat kimchi (he can eat it straight out of the jar now) I will be doing kimchi chigae a lot this winter.

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#64 ChryZ

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 04:10 AM

I like to make mine with anchovies, cubed firm tofu, zuchini, whole cloves of garlic, all garnished with sliced green onions.  Its best when you have chunky homemade dweng jang because the soy beans are whole and add a nice surprise.

Does anyone put meat in their dweng jang (other than anchovies for stock)?

View Post

Yeah, it's also great with tofu. The version above was also actually the first time, that I've used leek instead of green onions. Leek and pork are a great combo, so I always wanted to try it in this dish.

Someone mentioned to me, that the meat shouldn't be fried before adding it to the stew. Is that true?
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#65 ZenKimchi

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 04:40 PM

A question about the anchovies, I don't believe I have seen those before here in Japan, I wonder if it would be ok to substitute niboshi?

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I was just in Fukuoka last week, and I saw dried anchovies at the fish market. They do exist in Japan, at least.
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#66 Peter Green

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 10:59 AM

I have two favourite home meals. One is just kim chi jiggae (my transliteration is appalling, I know) which I wrote up on Dinner!

The other, which has become more difficult, is so gum gui.

the reason it's difficult is that our local butcher here can't shave the beef anymore, and I'm a klutz with a knife.

Take a good piece of rib eye, something with fat in it. Shave it thin. Then take your table top grill and put in some sesame oil.

Have ready some fresh spring onion seasoned with gochu garu (red pepper powder) and lots of rice. In little dishes, dole out some more sesame oil.

Lay the meat into the grill, and crack fresh pepper onto it (and some salt for me). cook it through, drop in the next meat, and eat what you've got by wrapping the meat around the spring onion, dipping on some more sesame oil, and scarfing down some rice.

Not only does it taste good, but it keeps the whole table working and talking.

#67 ChryZ

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 03:11 AM

I got some nice feedback at the cooking/dinner thread, so it's nothing but fair to share:

Dak Gochujang Bokum & Mandu
(chicken in hot chili sauce panfried with potstickers)

main ingredients:

1 X whole chicken breasts (2 halves)
1 X ginger (thumb-sized)
3 X garlic cloves (mushed)
3 X ice lettuce leaf (optional)
3 X green onions (sliced)
1 CUPS chicken stock
2 TBSP soy sauce
1 TBSP sugar
2 TBSP gochujang
2 TBSP chili flakes
2 TBSP roasted sesame
1 TBSP seasame oil (from roasted sesame)

sidedish ingredients:

5 X mandu (store bought)
1/2 CUP water
2 TBSP soy sauce
1 TBSP rice wine vinegar
1 TSP chopped green onion

slice the chicken and marinate with the sugar for at least 30 min

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add gochujang, soy sauce, chili flakes and seasame oil,
then prep garlic, ginger and the chicken stock

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heat pan and simmer chicken stock, grate ginger and garlic into it

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add marinated chicken and let it bubble away on medium heat

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evaporate nearly all the liquid, almost no need to stir

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in the meantime grab some mandus from the freezer

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place in small pan and crank up the heat to high, the frozen mandus will defrost a little

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add some water to the heated pan, the liquid should start to steam right away

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cover the pan and steam them, this will take only a few moments

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when all the liquid evaporated, deglaze the pan with another small sip of water,
it will help to give the mandus some color and it will loose 'em up, no need to
cover this time

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serve the chicken on a bed of ice lettuce topped with some roasted sesame
... and the potsticker with some soysauce+vinegar for dipping

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It's especially tasty to fiddle some chicken into a lettuce leaf and to eat it as a mini wrapper.

Enjoy.

Feedback, constructive criticism or any other comments are all most welcome.
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#68 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 03:27 AM

Wow! I'm glad this thread got bumped up again. I'll be sharing some of my recipes (shared by my good korean friends). I have a mean recipe for crab dwenjjang jjige, seafood pa jeon and chapjae.

Edited by Domestic Goddess, 13 October 2006 - 04:35 AM.

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#69 ChryZ

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 04:18 AM

Wow! I'm glad this thread got bumped up again. I'll be sharing some of my recipes (shared by my good korean friends). I have a mean recipe for card dwenjjang jjige, seafood pa jeon and chapjae.

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Looking forward to those! :wub:
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#70 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 04:44 AM

Chryz, here's the crab dwenjjang jjige:

2 medium crab, cleaned and cut in half

1/2 squash, cut in half, slice 1/2 inch thick

1/2 onion, sliced

1 medium potato, quartered, then slice 1/2 inch thick

2 green onions, chopped

2 chilies, sliced

10 oz tofu, cubed

4 tbsp dwen jang (Korean bean paste)

1 tbsp go choo jang (Korean chili paste)

1 tbsp go choo ga roo (Korean chili powder)

1 tbsp minced garlic

1 tsp sesame oil

Thinly sliced rings of leeks

In a pot, add sesame oil, add minced garlic and potato, cook on a medium-high heat for 5 minutes.Add water, bring to a boil.
Mix dwen jang (Korean bean paste), go choo jang (Korean chili paste), go choo ga roo (Korean chili powder) and add to the pot.

Add pieces of crab and the rest of the vegetables. Cook for another 2-4 minutes. Add tofu at the last stage of cooking (just enough to heat it through). Garnish with the slices of leeks and serve.

Best served with freshly steamed rice.

Edited by Domestic Goddess, 13 October 2006 - 04:45 AM.

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#71 ChryZ

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 06:04 AM

Chryz, here's the crab dwenjjang jjige

View Post

Nice! Crab is a bit hard to get here, but your recipe might actually help me to improve my 된장찌개. It's always nice to have a point of reference so I google'd and naver'd for keywords like 게 된장 찌개. How should the crab version look like?

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Any of those pics getting close to it?
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#72 rooftop1000

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 11:26 AM

ChryZ

This chicken looks truly evil, must make it this week


tracey

Edited by rooftop1000, 14 October 2006 - 11:27 AM.

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers
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Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

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#73 ChryZ

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 02:42 PM

Haemul Pajeon
(korean seafood/scallion pancake with spicy dip)

I've had this dish as part of a menu at a korean restaurant. Since I liked it a lot,
I did some research on it. First I've googled for english recipes, then I've found
the korean hangul version of pajeon (파전) via wikipedia. I've used it to search
the korean search engine naver.com and found a lot of pics, funny pictorials
and even a streamed cooking show (slightly annoying!), that explained how to
cook the dish. Do I speak korean? No. I've just pieced the english infos
and korean visual clues together and cooked the dish:

main ingredients

1 X egg
1 X bunch of scallions
2 X red chili
1 CUP flour
1 CUP ice water
1/3 CUP squid (1/4 of a squid, small slices)
1/3 CUP baby shrimp
1/3 CUP scallop (two adductor muscles, small slices)
1 TSP salt
1 TBSP sesame oil (pressed from roasted seeds)
3 TBSP peanut oil

dip ingredients

2 TBSP soy sauce
1 TBSP rice wine vinegar
1 TSP chopped scallion
1 TSP roasted sesame
1 TSP chili flakes
1 TSP sugar

Regarding the seafood, it seems preferable to have one third clam-something,
one third shellfish-something and one third cephalopod-something,
but the dish might also work with just canned tuna ;)

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first prep everything, once the pan is hot then there is no going back,
clean the seafood, slice the squid, the scallops, the chilies and trim
the scallions to pan-size, mix the dip ingredients

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final prep step ... the dough, use a bowl that will be able to accommodated the
scallions, crack/mix egg, add a sip of ice water, salt and sesame oil, mix well,
then add the flour

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mix and add only as much water that the dough is able to coat the scallions,
if the dough is too runny then add another spoon of flour until it's right

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heat a pan, oil generous, then whip the pan with a paper towel, it will create
a nice spread of oil pearls, wait for the oil to smoke

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add the scallions and somewhat align them before the dough settles down

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add the seafood and chili stripes, then spoon the rest of the remaining dough on top

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pour a little oil around the pancake/pajeon, use two spatula, shove them under each
end and perform the first flip

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check the color of the pajeon, if it's not burn then everything is right on track,
else adjust the heat a little or flip more often, use a spatula to peek underneath,
don't burn the seafood side

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second flip, seafood-side up, heat is perfect

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just keep frying and flipping

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done when nicely browned, remove from pan

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serve sliced to make it more chopstick/dip-able

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잘먹겠습니다 (jal meokkesseumnida)
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#74 SheenaGreena

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 02:50 PM

omg, that looks so delicious, chryz!!!!!!! Are you sure you're not korean?

I made pa jeon last night for an easy dinner. I took the easy way out though and used the premade mix and just threw in some scallions (cut on the bias). I love the seafood version with squid, clams, mussels, etc.
another fav version of pajeon is to throw in some old kimchi (juice included)

you should also try it with buckwheat flour. It provides a lovely colour and is a different way to make pajeon.
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#75 SheenaGreena

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 02:50 PM

(jal meokkesseumnida)


that made me laugh (:
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#76 ChryZ

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 03:19 PM

omg, that looks so delicious, chryz!!!!!!!  Are you sure you're not korean?

I made pa jeon last night for an easy dinner.  I took the easy way out though and used the premade mix and just threw in some scallions (cut on the bias).  I love the seafood version with squid, clams, mussels, etc.
another fav version of pajeon is to throw in some old kimchi (juice included)

you should also try it with buckwheat flour.  It provides a lovely colour and is a different way to make pajeon.

View Post

:laugh:

Your comments made my day. Thank you! Oh you are so right about the kimchi version, I've been there, well kinda ... without the pa, I did "kimchi-jeon". The hint about the buckwheat is great. I hoped for constructive feedback like that, I really appreciate it!

(jal meokkesseumnida)


that made me laugh (:

View Post

Oh, I just copy'n'pasted it off the net ... is the romanization that bad or is it something else?
I really shouldn't quote languages, that I can't read or speak! ^_^;
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#77 SheenaGreena

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 03:32 PM

Oh, I just copy'n'pasted it off the net ... is the romanization that bad or is it something else?
I really shouldn't quote languages, that I can't read or speak! ^_^;


I only laughed because it sounds like something my mother would say,its cute
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#78 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 07:20 PM

Chryz, the last pic of the crab dwenjang jjige looks like the ones served here in Janghowon.

Here's another tip for the pajeon, instead of whole leeks/green onions, try slicing it diagonally at an angle so that you get thin long slices. That way, when you mix it in the batter, the pancake will be nice and flat. It will also make it so easy to break apart with chopsticks when it's cooked.
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#79 SheenaGreena

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 08:50 PM

yeah, cutting them into slivers is nice. But if you want to keep them whole, you can cut your pajeon with scissors like they do in korea.
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#80 ChryZ

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 02:10 AM

Domestic Goddess, thanks for the hints.

To make them flat should be excellent when the pajeon is not the main dish, but more destined to be an appetizer or banchan,

I did that with my kimchi-jeon, cute little kimchi pancakes.

:wub:
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#81 Maria

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 03:07 AM

I read "Kochujang" and thought what the heck are they talking about? ... until I phonetically pronounced it. I was once conscripted by my mother into delivering a very large jar (it took two arms and hands to hold it) of it to my uncle's place. She had made it for him. I can't remember how it happened; however, that very large jar fell and crashed on my uncle's driveway with the entire ingredients. I was so embarassed.

Edited by Maria, 04 November 2006 - 03:08 AM.


#82 ZenKimchi

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 06:45 AM

Oh, the humanity!

And I'm not being sarcastic.
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#83 ChryZ

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 05:19 AM

Bulgogi was one the first korean dishes that I've tried to re-create at home.
So I've made Daeji Bulgogi last night and took a few pics in the process:

main ingredients

1 X pork tenderloin
1 X head ice lettuce
2 X garlic clove
4 X scallion (4 stalk)
1 CUP cooked rice
1/4 CUP roasted sesame
1/4 CUP veg or peanut oil
1/2 CUP sugar
3/4 CUP soy sauce
1 TSP pepper
1 TSP salt
1 TSP sesame seed oil (pressed from roasted seeds)

banchan #1 ingredients (mini side-dish, steamed bean sprouts)

1 X scallion (1 stalk, sliced lengthwise)
2 CUP bean sprouts
1 TBSP rice wine vinegar
1 TSP salt
1 TSP pepper
1 TSP sesame seed oil (pressed from roasted seeds)

banchan #2 ingredients (mini side-dish, fried garlic)

4 X garlic clove (roughly sliced)
1 TBSP peanut oil

ssamjang ingredients (sauce, dip, dressing)

2 TBSP gochujang
2 TBSP water
1 TBSP minced scallion
1 TBSP rice wine
1 TBSP sesame oil (pressed from roasted seeds)
1 TSP doenjang
1 TSP chili flakes
1 TSP garlic powder
2 TSP roasted sesame

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cut the meat in thin slices, combine all other main ingredients (except the lettuce)

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blend until smooth, it's not necessary to get every sesame seed though ;)

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marinate the pork slices, 30-60 minutes at room temperature should do the job, prep the rice

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combine all ssamjang ingredients

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mix well and set aside

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combine all veggie ingredients from banchan #1 in a bowl,
cover the bowl and microwave it for 90 sec with 600W

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the veggies will steam from their own water content and soften up,
dress them with the remaining banchan #1 ingredients, set aside

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remove the meat from the marinade, wipe off each piece on the edge of the bowl,
try to remove a good lot of the marinade, too much left of it will cause a mess

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heat/fire-up a bbq pan, gass grill or charcoal grill, make a little tin-foil cup
and add oil and garlic to it, it's like a mini deep fryer, keep an eye on it and
remove it from the pan once the garlic turned gold brown

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the sugar from the marinate will burn quickly to bitter coal (Carbonization)
if the heat is too high or the cooking process is too long, timing and heat control for the win,
medium heat is hot enough to cook such tender/delicate meat, slow caramelization is the key

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keep flipping the meat, such thin slices only take a minute or two

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don't burn the garlic, flip it every now and then to check the browning process,
remove when gold brown, drain fat with some paper towel

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the whole set, time to eat:

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all the food can be enjoyed individually, but the most delicous way is to grab a lettuce leaf,
stuff it with rice, sprouts, ssamjang, roasted garlic and some bulgogi, then to wrap it up
and munch it away in one go ... with a big grin on your face :D

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Comments, constructive criticism and hints are all most welcome!
Christian Z. aka ChryZ
[ 1337 3475 - LEET EATS ] Blog

#84 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 07:27 AM

Chryz - your type of eating is definitely so Korean! If you ever come this way of my part of the world, I'd take you to the best bulgogi place in town - an EAT ALL YOU CAN Bulgogi-Kalbi and Samgyeopsal restaurant.
Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

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#85 ChryZ

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 07:49 AM

Chryz - your type of eating is definitely so Korean! If you ever come this way of my part of the world, I'd take you to the best bulgogi place in town - an EAT ALL YOU CAN Bulgogi-Kalbi and Samgyeopsal restaurant.

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That would be awesome, but I have to pass on the soju! :wacko: :laugh:
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#86 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 05:25 PM

No problem because we don't drink alcohol and I don't even drink Coca-cola.
Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

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eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

#87 SheenaGreena

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 06:37 PM

anyone else out there eat their ssam without rice? next time go w/o rice so you can throw more stuff in it. also try grilling some old, sour, kimchi after you are done grilling your meat. This will lend a nice flavour to the kimchi. yum yum. This is what my family does after we eat korean bbq.
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#88 melonpan

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 07:18 PM

anyone else out there eat their ssam without rice?  next time go w/o rice so you can throw more stuff in it.  also try grilling some old, sour, kimchi after you are done grilling your meat. This will lend a nice flavour to the kimchi. yum yum.  This is what my family does after we eat korean bbq.

i cannot commit. both ways are delicious.
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#89 SheenaGreena

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 08:43 PM

i cannot commit. both ways are delicious.


can't commit to what? omitting rice from your ssam? too much filler! always when I have sam gyup sal or kalbi at home I don't ask for any rice. if I have rice while eating ssam, I will just dump the whole bowl into whatever soup I am eating

please people, try the grilled kimchi.

also, is there any way to get rid of smelling like bacon or grilled beef after grilling in the kitchen for over an hour? After I do this at my parents house, my little sister and I go out shopping or something and omg our hair smells like bacon. It is so delicious and so gross at the same time :biggrin:

also I hate chryz, because she (you're a girl right?) puts alot of effort and time into making her korean food and it shows.

Edited by SheenaGreena, 08 November 2006 - 08:44 PM.

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#90 SheenaGreena

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 08:52 PM

for my viewing pleasure :biggrin: chryz should make the following items:


kal gook soo
soon doo boo w/ assorted seafood or maybe pork
bossam with steamed pork belly and oysters (oh my god if you make this I will be so jealous)
Seolleong Tang - good for cold weather


I don't get to eat a genuine "mom" home cooked korean meal till dec 22, will I last this long? who knows. At least I get to bring a cooler full of kimchi home
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