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Transfer Sheets: Sourcing & Shipping

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#1 RuthWells

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 05:55 PM

I was window-shopping and found some cool transfer sheet designs. I've never ordered from these folks, but they came to me well-recommended.


Pfeil & Holing

Just thought I'd share!

#2 RuthWells

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 12:39 PM

Thanks for sharing! Love the leopard print. :wub: I've never seen that before.

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I'm loving the gold "laser lights" on page 3. :smile:

#3 Joni

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 12:47 PM

Fabulous...how can you use these??

#4 RuthWells

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 05:39 PM

Fabulous...how can you use these??

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They're usually used when making chocolates, but I suppose there might be other applications..... hopefully someone more knowledgeable than I will chime in!

#5 John DePaula

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 06:33 PM

Yes, you can use them to decorate chocolates or to make chocolate decorations for your desserts.

Example of Bonbon Decorated with Transfer Sheet

I'd be happy to explain in more detail, if you like.

Edited by John DePaula, 11 October 2005 - 06:54 PM.

John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#6 John DePaula

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 07:55 PM

One way to use transfer sheets is with magnetic chocolate molds. These are 2 piece polycarbonate molds held together with magnets. The molds can be used to sandwich a transfer sheet. When you fill the mold with chocolate, the transfer pattern, well…, transfers to the chocolate. Here’s a link to the Kerekes site that shows how the magnetic molds are used: Transfer Sheet Example

Another way to use the transfers is simply to place a thin coating of chocolate on the sheet. Then just before the chocolate sets, you can score the pieces and / or roll the sheet and allow to dry. Voila! Now you have chocolate decorations.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#7 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 08:20 PM

My favorite source for transfer sheets is definaltey PBC company in France. http://www.pcb-creation.fr/

If you dare, buy their catalog (it's like $5.00) I want everything they sell.

#8 John DePaula

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 08:42 PM

My favorite source for transfer sheets is definaltey PBC company in France. http://www.pcb-creation.fr/

If you dare, buy their catalog (it's like $5.00) I want everything they sell.

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Yes, you're right Wendy; they have great products (their catalog is more like $15, though) but the shipping & taxes are killers!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#9 JamericanDiva

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 08:59 PM

I was window-shopping and found some cool transfer sheet designs.  I've never ordered from these folks, but they came to me well-recommended. 


Pfeil & Holing

Just thought I'd share!

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I live in NY and buy from them all the time. Their prices can't be beat 'round these parts!
Diva

#10 RuthWells

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 08:43 AM

Yes, you can use them to decorate chocolates or to make chocolate decorations for your desserts. 

Example of Bonbon Decorated with Transfer Sheet

I'd be happy to explain in more detail, if you like.

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Could we possibly coax you into doing a demo, John? :wink:

#11 John DePaula

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 06:15 PM

Could we possibly coax you into doing a demo, John?  :wink:

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Sounds like a fun project. Will have to get back to you in a couple of weeks since my schedule is so hectic right now.

Ciao!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#12 John DePaula

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 07:41 PM

Here you go: DEMO: Transfer Sheets on Chocolate Bonbons, Using Magnetic Chocolate Molds
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#13 gfron1

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 10:24 PM

I'm looking for a transfer sheet that would be perfect for a women's fiber arts collective fundraiser. Since I've not dabbled in chocolates, I'm thinking I'll stick to what I know and bake something, but top it with a tempered chocolate square that has a pattern on it. The ideal would be an American Indian weave design.

Chef Rubber wasn't much help, nor was Pfeil & Holing. And sorry Kerry, but I'm not up for making my own just yet :blink:

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#14 lapin d'or

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 01:40 AM

gfron1, if you cannot find a transfer sheet that looks right you might have some luck with texture/structure sheets. No colour there unless you use coloured white chocolate but these can have weave type patterns on them.

I have looked at the pcb creations web site a lot but never bought anything , I think they ship worldwide but shipping cocoa butter sheets in summer might be tricky. pcb

#15 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 04:06 AM

I'm looking for a transfer sheet that would be perfect for a women's fiber arts collective fundraiser.  Since I've not dabbled in chocolates, I'm thinking I'll stick to what I know and bake something, but top it with a tempered chocolate square that has a pattern on it.  The ideal would be an American Indian weave design.

Chef Rubber wasn't much help, nor was Pfeil & Holing.  And sorry Kerry, but I'm not up for making my own just yet  :blink:

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Rob,
If you've got a spare couple of hundred dollars lying around there is always American Chocolate Designs. Some of those weaves would make gorgeous transfers.

#16 Lior

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 04:39 AM

Hi. Lovely demo! I noticed that you used a melter. I am looking into getting two. Which company do you have? Mol d'art? And what size is the smallest while still being able to use a mold over it to cleanly pour out the chocolate. Right now I do this over my x3210 tempering machine and it is a bit messy, due to the bowl diameter.
Any info would be welcome!
Thanks!
Lior

Edited by Lior, 09 August 2007 - 04:41 AM.


#17 David J.

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 07:11 AM

Hi. Lovely demo! I noticed that you used a melter. I am looking into getting two. Which company do you have? Mol d'art? And what size is the smallest while still being able to use a mold over it to cleanly pour out the chocolate. Right now I do this over my x3210 tempering machine and it is a bit messy, due to the bowl diameter.
Any info would be welcome!
Thanks!
Lior

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The 6Kg melters are the smallest you can cleanly flip a mold over. The 3Kg melter is round instead of rectangular and would give you the same trouble as your x3210. I've got a pair of the 6Kg Mol d'art melters and I'm quite happy with them.

#18 Darcie B

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 07:21 AM

These designs got me thinking - how would (or could) I use them on the caramels that I make? Could I put them on the bottom of my sheet pan and pour the caramel onto it, then flip over and remove? I have never worked with these before so I am totally clueless.
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#19 alanamoana

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 09:17 AM

caramel would be too hot to pour directly on transfer sheets.

they are meant for chocolate for the most part. you can dip your caramels and then use the transfer on the chocolate as an option.

#20 gfron1

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 09:22 AM

Kerry - that is a nice selection of designs, and not as expensive as I thought they were going to be based on your comment. I'm going to pay more on shipping than the sheets themselves...geez you can even get Republic and Democrat transfers. Who knew :raz:

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#21 Lior

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 12:14 PM

Hi. Lovely demo! I noticed that you used a melter. I am looking into getting two. Which company do you have? Mol d'art? And what size is the smallest while still being able to use a mold over it to cleanly pour out the chocolate. Right now I do this over my x3210 tempering machine and it is a bit messy, due to the bowl diameter.
Any info would be welcome!
Thanks!
Lior

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The 6Kg melters are the smallest you can cleanly flip a mold over. The 3Kg melter is round instead of rectangular and would give you the same trouble as your x3210. I've got a pair of the 6Kg Mol d'art melters and I'm quite happy with them.

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Hi! That is what I thought, so Iwill get the 6kg. I think I will be there in Oct for a course so I will buy them and save on shipping and customs! I hope this is what will happen...
Thanks1

#22 bkeith

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 08:15 AM

caramel would be too hot to pour directly on transfer sheets.

they are meant for chocolate for the most part.  you can dip your caramels and then use the transfer on the chocolate as an option.

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I saw some petits fours several years ago that were wrapped in marzipan and had a transfer on them. I didn't see the process, but I was told the marzipan was painted with melted cocoa butter, then placed onto the transfer sheet. When the cocoa butter set, it took the transfer design.

Maybe you could do something similar with caramels? Pour them out and let them cool. Then paint on a thin layer of melted cocoa butter and lay a transfer sheet on top (maybe flip the caramel over first so you're working with a nice flat surface.

Worth a try, anyway.
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#23 Darcie B

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 11:47 AM

caramel would be too hot to pour directly on transfer sheets.

they are meant for chocolate for the most part.  you can dip your caramels and then use the transfer on the chocolate as an option.

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I saw some petits fours several years ago that were wrapped in marzipan and had a transfer on them. I didn't see the process, but I was told the marzipan was painted with melted cocoa butter, then placed onto the transfer sheet. When the cocoa butter set, it took the transfer design.

Maybe you could do something similar with caramels? Pour them out and let them cool. Then paint on a thin layer of melted cocoa butter and lay a transfer sheet on top (maybe flip the caramel over first so you're working with a nice flat surface.

Worth a try, anyway.

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Thanks - sounds like a good idea! I'll try it (as soon as the humidity around here is less than 95% :hmmm:)
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#24 alanamoana

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 09:22 PM

caramel would be too hot to pour directly on transfer sheets.

they are meant for chocolate for the most part.  you can dip your caramels and then use the transfer on the chocolate as an option.

View Post



I saw some petits fours several years ago that were wrapped in marzipan and had a transfer on them. I didn't see the process, but I was told the marzipan was painted with melted cocoa butter, then placed onto the transfer sheet. When the cocoa butter set, it took the transfer design.

Maybe you could do something similar with caramels? Pour them out and let them cool. Then paint on a thin layer of melted cocoa butter and lay a transfer sheet on top (maybe flip the caramel over first so you're working with a nice flat surface.

Worth a try, anyway.

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i like that idea. i just wonder how quickly you have to work when working with small amounts of cocoa butter as the temperature has to be just right in order for the transfer to "take". even when dipping in chocolate and using transfer sheets, if the chocolate is a couple of degrees too cool, the transfers won't stick.

#25 John DePaula

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 07:14 AM

i like that idea.  i just wonder how quickly you have to work when working with small amounts of cocoa butter as the temperature has to be just right in order for the transfer to "take".  even when dipping in chocolate and using transfer sheets, if the chocolate is a couple of degrees too cool, the transfers won't stick.

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You might be able to gently warm using a hair dryer if the transfer doesn't take... though this might be an iffy proposition.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#26 Delartful Delights

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 10:07 PM

Hi Everyone,

I really want to place an order for some Chocolate Transfer Sheets from PCB. I'm in Australia, and I'm concerned about them melting on the way here.

Has anyone had any experience with them melting? It's not very hot here yet, however the delivery vans can get very hot. I'd just hate to pay out all the money and have them melt before they get here. :shock:

Has anyone had any experience in having them shipped? I've looked at their webpage, and they have no info on warm weather shipping or policies.

Thanks in advance - I'm new here, I just LOVE this site! :wub:
Danni

#27 HQAntithesis

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 02:26 AM

I think PCB would have a distributor in Australia. Depending where you're based you could try the Savour School (Melb) or The Essential Ingredient(Syd/Melb( for smaller quantities or Meyer(Syd) or Creative Ingredients(Melb) for larger quantities.

Hi Everyone,

I really want to place an order for some Chocolate Transfer Sheets from PCB.  I'm in Australia, and I'm concerned about them melting on the way here. 

Has anyone had any experience with them melting?  It's not very hot here yet, however the delivery vans can get very hot.  I'd just hate to pay out all the money and have them melt before they get here.  :shock:

Has anyone had any experience in having them shipped?  I've looked at their webpage, and they have no info on warm weather shipping or policies.

Thanks in advance - I'm new here, I just LOVE this site!  :wub:
Danni

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#28 choux

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 09:01 AM

I've had them shipped to Canada, and they've arrived just fine. they usually get shipped out on Monday and I'll get them Wednesday. There isn't a lot of time for them to get too hot. Be prepared for a huge shipping bill, it costs a lot to get them to arrive that fast. The last ones I got cost about 40 Euros just for shipping.
If you really are concerned, I would phone them, I have before and they do speak English. You can work out the time difference youself though!!

#29 sote23

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 06:33 PM

I've never had a problem with them either. They arrive perfect.
Luis

#30 alanamoana

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 10:40 PM

i think the problem the op is worried about is justified...remember in the antipodes, our winter is their summer (and vice versa), so regardless of when they order, the weather on one end or the other might not be ideal for shipping.

i would really consider what the second poster mentioned and try to order from a local distributor. that way, you're guaranteed a decent product. the con would be a limited choice in patterns/colors.

pcb is a good company, they happen to have (in my opinion) a monopoly on good design for transfer sheets. but, as mentioned, their shipping prices are a pain. in the usa this is a problem now because of the weak dollar. it wasn't so in the past.

good luck with your ordering!

edited to add: in a more direct response to your question, they don't specify differences in shipping costs based on season. it is a sort of "order at your own risk" kind of policy. also, they don't pack in any sort of insulated or specialized packaging. if you're ordering for a business, you might be able to order in bulk which might warrant more/better packaging. i've only ordered small quantities from them at a time. of course, you can always call them. it can be a pain. e-mailing them is a relatively futile experience. the europeans are woefully behind when it comes to internet (international) commerce.

Edited by alanamoana, 04 November 2007 - 10:48 PM.






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