Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Cooking from The Cook's Book


  • Please log in to reply
46 replies to this topic

#1 jackal10

jackal10
  • participating member
  • 5,036 posts

Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:18 AM

I've just posted a review to Amazon UK of "The Cook's Book" (Jill Norman ed)
ISBN 1-4053-0337-9.
I said
Stellar. This is a must-have book for any serious cook or chef. Top chefs demonstrating their signature dishes. Ferran Adria on foams, Dan Lepard on Bread, Pierre Herme on deserts, the list goes on and on, soup to nuts. 24 chapters each by the master in their field, lavishly illustrated, not just food porn but working pictures of each stage in the process. A book to cook from, not just leave on the coffee table, although it looks good there as well. A book I will keep returning to.
My only criticism so far is that the large glossy format is awkward in the kitchen. I wish the publishers would publish it also in electronic form, or have included a DVD so that one can print out just the recipes in use to take into the kitchen.

Edited by jackal10, 07 October 2005 - 03:39 PM.


#2 Priscilla

Priscilla
  • participating member
  • 1,834 posts
  • Location:SoCal Scruburbia

Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:24 AM

Jackal is correct, this is a stupendous book. Dan Lepard's contributions are especially inspiring, but there is much else as well.

The large format is a bit bulky to heft around in the kitchen, but my one manufacturing wish would have been for a couple of placeholding ribbons. Wouldn't have minded a DVD as Jackal suggests, either, even better than ribbons!

Priscilla

~Observing Taco Friday since 2010~

Twitter InstagramOCFoodNation.com Orange Coast Magazine

 


#3 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,626 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:55 AM

Here's that link (with an eGullet Society tag) to Amazon. It's also available at the usual sources used for deep discounts.
Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#4 Michael Ruhlman

Michael Ruhlman
  • participating member
  • 466 posts

Posted 07 October 2005 - 12:45 PM

I saw this at the bookstore the other day and was impressed. Lavish production, the experts weighing in in their field. Was this published in the UK or here? I'd like to know how it will be used.

What are the best basic fundamentals cookbooks out there?

#5 danlepard

danlepard
  • participating member
  • 161 posts

Posted 08 October 2005 - 04:37 AM

Was this published in the UK or here?


Michael, the editorial production for The Cook's Book was based in London, but as co-editions for the US, Australia, Spain (and others) were planned for the same release date it felt like a joint-published project. And the co-edition publishers occasionally guided the content, and in one case I know of, the specific ingredients and method used in a recipe. A long, complex affair involving many editors, photographers, stylists and chefs in different countries, working to a tight style sheet that DK insisted effect the look of the photography and the manner in which the recipes were expressed. Given the complexity of this jigsaw it looks rather seamless - the photographer's own styles merge behind the house look, and the language smoothed so that clear method becomes the principal thing. It could have ended blandly but instead ended in (my view) a detailed collection of basic and specialized techniques.
Dan

#6 Ann Hall Every, CCP

Ann Hall Every, CCP
  • participating member
  • 8 posts

Posted 08 October 2005 - 09:20 AM

I've just posted a review to Amazon UK of "The Cook's Book" (Jill Norman ed)
ISBN 1-4053-0337-9.
I said
Stellar. This is a must-have book for any serious cook or chef. Top chefs demonstrating their signature dishes. Ferran Adria on foams, Dan Lepard on Bread, Pierre Herme on deserts, the list goes on and on, soup to nuts. 24 chapters each by the master in their field, lavishly illustrated, not just food porn but working pictures of each stage in the process. A book to cook from, not just leave on the coffee table, although it looks good there as well. A book I will keep returning to.
My only criticism so far is that the large glossy format is awkward in the kitchen. I wish the publishers would publish it also in electronic form, or have included a DVD so that one can print out just the recipes in use to take into the kitchen.

View Post


Hi,

I too just posted a review of The Cook's Book to my website page on "Cookbook Reviews" - I too thought it a beautiful work - except with one problem I had with a certain recipe - but overall a beautiful book. I'll forward your comment about a DVD or other electronic format for the book - great idea!

Ann
www.cookwithaloha.com

#7 M.X.Hassett

M.X.Hassett
  • legacy participant
  • 1,074 posts
  • Location:Bergen County NJ

Posted 08 October 2005 - 09:54 AM

Ann, what was the problem with the recipe in case someone runs into the same problem we will be prepared. Thanks
Matthew Xavier Hassett aka "M.X.Hassett"

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters-it is vulgarly called bittered sling and is supposed to be an exellent electioneering potion..."
- Balance and Columbian Repository. May 13, 1806

#8 sugarcookie

sugarcookie
  • participating member
  • 31 posts
  • Location:Minneapolis, MN

Posted 08 October 2005 - 03:59 PM

I am very impressed with this book. I work in a bookstore, and have added it to my list of Xmas recommendations. I love the pictures; so rarely do you see clear photographs of techniques.

#9 helenas

helenas
  • participating member
  • 1,410 posts

Posted 08 October 2005 - 07:33 PM

Here's that link (with an eGullet Society tag) to Amazon. It's also available at the usual sources used for deep discounts.


you might want to change the link to US edition which is way cheaper and ships in 24 hours: ISBN 0756613027

#10 shelora

shelora
  • legacy participant
  • 1,160 posts
  • Location:Victoria, B.C.

Posted 12 October 2005 - 06:54 AM

I've just posted a review to Amazon UK of "The Cook's Book" (Jill Norman ed)
ISBN 1-4053-0337-9.
I said
Stellar. This is a must-have book for any serious cook or chef. Top chefs demonstrating their signature dishes. Ferran Adria on foams, Dan Lepard on Bread, Pierre Herme on deserts, the list goes on and on, soup to nuts. 24 chapters each by the master in their field, lavishly illustrated, not just food porn but working pictures of each stage in the process. A book to cook from, not just leave on the coffee table, although it looks good there as well. A book I will keep returning to.
My only criticism so far is that the large glossy format is awkward in the kitchen. I wish the publishers would publish it also in electronic form, or have included a DVD so that one can print out just the recipes in use to take into the kitchen.

View Post


How do the recipes work for the home kitchen? Has anyone put them to task?

#11 Jon Tseng

Jon Tseng
  • participating member
  • 2,077 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 06:55 AM

Picked up TCB last week

Very impressive - a cut above normal Dorling Kindersley books (normally well presented, but basic).

One concern would be how much the big names really contributed to their respective chapters - guess you will never know.

Notable for its discussion of foams, an area still not well covered in cookbooks (think Rick Tramato talks about them a bit in his Amuse-Bouche book... although I could be getting it confused with a chapter of savory ice-cream)

Also, I think, the first time Marcus Wareing has appeared in print. His section on meat is also good.

J

Edited by Jon Tseng, 12 October 2005 - 07:01 AM.

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

#12 Carlovski

Carlovski
  • participating member
  • 1,547 posts
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 18 October 2005 - 10:45 AM

For UK people (Who still prefer buying books from a bookshop) they are selling this at Sussex Stationers bookshops (Discount bookshop - don't know how far they spread) for £15. I'm going to get a copy as soon as I get paid!
I love animals.
They are delicious.

#13 Shalmanese

Shalmanese
  • participating member
  • 3,473 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 26 November 2005 - 02:21 PM

Just picked up a copy yesterday and was leafing through it on a 13 our flight. It truely is a fantastic book and contains a ton of inspiration. I especially love all the esoteric chef tricks which wouldn't find thier way into a normal cookbook.
PS: I am a guy.

#14 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 27 November 2005 - 10:35 PM

This book was the first book that actually made cooking make sense to me.. With amazing pictures and step by step direction, it makes me wonder why all books dont utilize photography as a tool, the way this book does.. For people who are visual, this book is a dream.. I have made about 30 percent of the recipes and there isnt a dud in the bunch...

Breakfast to ham hock terrine, this book is important to me..

#15 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,455 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 28 November 2005 - 02:17 AM

This book was the first book that actually made cooking make sense to me.. With amazing pictures and step by step direction, it makes me wonder why all books dont utilize photography as a tool, the way this book does.. For people who are visual, this book is a dream..  I have made about 30 percent of the recipes and there isnt a dud in the bunch...

Breakfast to ham hock terrine, this book is important to me..

View Post


Daniel, this thread has been hijacked so often that I need to ask if you are referring to the thread topic The Cook's Book or to one of the other recommended books. I am very interested in learning about The Cook's Book and whether someone who is never likely to make foams would still find it valuable. Many thanks.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#16 jackal10

jackal10
  • participating member
  • 5,036 posts

Posted 28 November 2005 - 02:23 AM

Anna N.
Foams are only a small part of one chapter in "the Cooks Book"
Lots and lots of good stuff in there, Perhaps not replacing a basic book like "La Technique", but fantastic reading for anyone interested in food.

#17 mrsadm

mrsadm
  • participating member
  • 528 posts
  • Location:Berkshire NY

Posted 28 November 2005 - 03:00 AM

I would seriously like to know if this book has any value - as another poster said - for someone unlikely to make foams at home. Or, do I really want to know how to prepare quail and leave the head still on? My grocery story doesn't carry whole quail, nor am I likely to yearn for the delicacy of quail brains.

Is there anything I can learn from this book to make it worth the money, that I can apply to my weekend cooking, the goal of which is to make good tasting stuff for family and friends (and self)?
*****
"Did you see what Julia Child did to that chicken?" ... Howard Borden on "Bob Newhart"
*****

#18 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,455 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 28 November 2005 - 06:35 AM

Anna N.
Foams are only a small part of one chapter in "the Cooks Book"
Lots and lots of good stuff in there, Perhaps not replacing a basic book like "La Technique", but fantastic reading for anyone interested in food.

View Post


Thanks, Jack. That's what I was trying to find out. I think I am going to put it on my Christmas list!
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#19 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 November 2005 - 07:06 AM

Anna.. I am referring to the Cook's Book. Not everything in this book is tricky like foams.. I havent made a foam or roasted a quail from this book.. Although, Mrsadm I would highly suggest frying a quail up..

I have made simple things like egg dishes.. Complex things like stuffed pork roasts.. I have made pasta dishes,fish dishes, and meat dishes.. As I said before, the set up is so user friendly and the step by step pictures are so instructive..

Even with the small chapter on foams, its seems so easy... Basically, you just put whatever sauce in a whipped cream maker and add nitrous.. There is the foam...

Edited by Daniel, 28 November 2005 - 07:24 AM.


#20 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,455 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 28 November 2005 - 11:54 AM

Anna.. I am referring to the Cook's Book.  Not everything in this book is tricky like foams.. I havent made a foam or roasted a quail from this book.. Although, Mrsadm I would highly suggest frying a quail up..

I have made simple things like egg dishes.. Complex things like stuffed pork roasts.. I have made pasta dishes,fish dishes, and meat dishes.. As I said before, the set up is so user friendly and the step by step pictures are so instructive..

Even with the small chapter on foams, its seems so easy... Basically, you just put whatever sauce in a whipped cream maker and add nitrous.. There is the foam...

View Post


Many thanks, Daniel. I am hoping now that Santa will look kindly upon me and give me the book instead of a lump of coal. :shock:
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#21 Shalmanese

Shalmanese
  • participating member
  • 3,473 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 28 November 2005 - 02:42 PM

Yes, foams and quail brains only make up a small section of the book. The reason why they are mentioned so often here is because they are among the more interesting sections. But the real strength of the Cooks Book is in the basics. You are taught how to make stocks, sauces, fresh pasta, cakes, bread and many other basic preparations. In addition, it has chapters on many non-european cuisines including Chinese, Japanese, Indian, Middle Eastern, Mexican etc. all written by experts in the field.
PS: I am a guy.

#22 Raj Banerjee

Raj Banerjee
  • participating member
  • 77 posts
  • Location:Kensington, London

Posted 28 November 2005 - 05:30 PM

For UK people (Who still prefer buying books from a bookshop) they are selling this at Sussex Stationers bookshops (Discount bookshop - don't know how far they spread) for £15. I'm going to get a copy as soon as I get paid!

View Post


Just bought a copy from Sussex Stationers (thank goodness I'm at my Mum and Dad's place, which is near Harrow!). 15 pounds...nice.

Havent read through it yet as I am packing to go away tomorrow...now do I lug this across the pond with me or not??? Considering I may end up picking up a few books from the States probably not...gonna be up a while tonight by the looks of things!

Raj

PS it does seem like its worth having, covers a LOT of ground, with step by step pictures.

#23 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 November 2005 - 06:38 PM

Under the example of poaching, there is this recipe.. Step by step photos.. The dish was so simple.. And it was a great way for me to get experience using skate wing.. Which happened to be my first time.. I made this mixture of water, vinegar, and some herbs... Simmered the Skate for 10 mins and it was done... Very tastey.

Page #190
Posted Image

Edited by Daniel, 28 November 2005 - 06:41 PM.


#24 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 November 2005 - 06:46 PM

Page 136#

The sweet onion balsamic vinegar frittata.. This was a delicious dish I made for breakfast.. Fairly easy for cooking on a saturday morning.. Feeds four..

Posted Image

#25 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 November 2005 - 06:50 PM

Page #140

Eggs baked with meats mozzerella and spinach.. Uovo Al Forno

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#26 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 November 2005 - 06:54 PM

Page #302

Braised Pork Belly

Posted Image

Posted Image

Page #307

Carmalized Bacon

Posted Image

Page #308 Smoked Ham hock Terriane


Posted Image

#27 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 November 2005 - 07:00 PM

Page #144

Malfatti:


Posted Image

Edited by Daniel, 28 November 2005 - 07:00 PM.


#28 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,455 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 03 December 2005 - 05:22 AM

Daniel: Thank you so much for the effort you have put into showing the potential of The Cook's Book! I have ordered it and hope to have it in my hands by Christmas - got a really good deal as Amazon.ca sent me a $10 promotional certificate after I ordered a couple of Christmas gifts. Cost me less than $40 Cdn with shipping.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#29 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,455 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 December 2005 - 04:24 AM

The Cook's Book arrived yesterday and it is all that it is cracked up to be, in my opinion. I am hoarding it - reading a few paragraphs at a time, trying to digest them but living in anticipation of the next few. My only objection so far is the darn heft of the thing - I have to read it while it rests on a sturdy surface. :biggrin:
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#30 lamington

lamington
  • participating member
  • 297 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 16 December 2005 - 04:13 AM

I'm very curious to know whether there are any noticeable differences between the US/UK/AU editions. The AU edition has both metric and either Imperial or US measures, so I assume other editions do this...? Is it just a case of localised ingredients/cooking terms?
-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham
The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine
Syrup & Tang - candid commentary and flavourful fancies

"It's healthy. It's cake. It's chocolate cake."