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eG Foodblog: torakris/snowangel - When Pocky meets pad thai....

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#61 snowangel

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 08:45 PM

It's interesting about ramen noodles. At least with the Mama brand, the ones with rice noodles are far lower in fat than the ones with the "other kind" of noodles. The "other kind" are apparently deep fried before they are put in the package.
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#62 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 08:47 PM

Kris, do the Korean ramen noodles have a packet of grease included?  I swear that's what makes the Mama brand so wonderful.

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this particular brand didn't, some of the Korean ones I buy do as do some of the Japanese ones. This was my first time to buy this particular Korean brand and I didn't like it as much as ones I have eaten in the past.

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#63 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 08:52 PM

I used to eat ramen noodles a lot, without giving it a thought.  Now I'm wondering: what makes a noodle a ramen noodle, and what makes it good vs. great vs. low-quality?  Expound, both of you, please.

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For me the biggest difference between the Japanese and Korean ramen are the noodles. The Korean ones are thicker and have more flavor, they are also so good you can eat them as a snack straight from the package (before cooking them). As to flavor the Japanese ones offer more variety, the Korean ones seems to come in just one flavor: spicy. Of course this is just what is available in Japan, they may have a bigger selection in Korea.
As I mentioned in my last post I didn't care for this brand as much as others I have had, the soup was just lacking flavor.

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#64 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 08:55 PM

lunch for the rabbits

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it is difficult to see but it is cabbage and apple slices, the apples were soaked in salted water to prevent discoloration....
I can't possibly be remembered as the mother who fed the rabbits brown apples, can I?

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#65 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 09:06 PM

But, when I realized that woman can not live on coffee and pretzels (with an occasional apple tossed in), I went to the fridge and retrieved some leftovers from last night:

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Hide is home for lunch on Weds and from a little while ago we made Weds lunch curry day. We both eat some kind of instant curry....

I just dump the pack into the tupperware the leftover rice was in and heat it up.

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Susan, I can't tell you how happy I am to see your tupperware lunch! :laugh:

These were the curries we had today:

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mine is the kerala curry and Hide is the beef curry (our co-op's brand)

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#66 Chris Amirault

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:10 PM

Kristin, what does that "co-op" label mean on the right package? Are there products marketed directly to co-ops?
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#67 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:16 PM

Kristin, what does that "co-op" label mean on the right package? Are there products marketed directly to co-ops?

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Yes,
it is sort of like a generic.
There are actually quite a few "national" co-op' s in Japan, I belong to one called Seikyo Co-op and more specifically the Kanagawa (for Kanagawa Prefecture) Group. The Co-op's produce now many of their own foods very similar to the store generic brands in the US.

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#68 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:18 PM

So I made

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Susan, I had forgot to ask, did you have any rice with that?

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#69 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:27 PM

Kris, if and when you get a chance, please talk about learning Japanese.  Could you already speak and read it before you got married?  If not, how did you go about learning, and how comfortable are you with it now?  I'm guessing you're quite fluent.  That's impressive for only 10 years, even with immersion-by-marriage.  :biggrin:


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I was actually a Japanese language minor in college, so I had four years of college level studies under my belt before moving here. The emphasis at school was on reading and writing so it took a couple years before I really felt comfortable speaking. I wouldn't call myself fluent but I have no problem doing things and haven't asked my husband for help in a couple years. I handle all the daily household problems, school things, doctor visits, etc. I am really glad I know how to read though, I couldn't imagine living here if I couldn't read...

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#70 eJulia

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:31 PM

Torakris:

If we were able to find some of the products you mention at an Asian market here in the states, would they have directions in English?

Thanks, Julia
"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”
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#71 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:34 PM

Torakris:

If we were able to find some of the products you mention at an Asian market here in the states, would they have directions in English?

Thanks, Julia

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They should. Usually there with be a sticker on the back with nutritional information, ingredients and directions.
If you ever find something you want to try but it seems to be be missing English directions just ask over at the Japan Forum we are more than happy to help out!

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#72 torakris

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 11:37 PM

I had to run to the drug store today to pick up some batteries, a couple other things made their way into my basket...

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Hide really wanted those digestive biscuits. :biggrin: We had one box for our 3 o'clock snack today.

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#73 jackal10

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 12:18 AM

OOOH! Proper McVities dark chocolate biscuits. The milk ones are an aberration. I thought they only were available in the UK. The packaging is different - in the uK they are in a tube or a round pack.
The plain not-chocolate-covered are great with strong cheeses, or for dunking in coffee. Do you get Hobnobs or Jaffa cakes as well?

Edited by jackal10, 05 October 2005 - 12:29 AM.


#74 Pan

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 12:22 AM

snack #2

bamboo root shaped chocolates

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Those are so cute!

#75 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 12:26 AM

OOOH! Proper McVities dark chocolate biscuits. The milk ones are an aberration. I thought they only were available in the UK. The packaging is different - in the uK they are in a tube or a round pack.
The plain non-milk are great with strong cheeses, or for dunking in coffee. Do you get Hobnobs or Jaffa cakes as well?

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These McVities biscuits I think are pretty new to Japan, I ahd never seen them before last week. The dark chocolate ones are definitely my favorite the kids preferred the milk chocolate. Over in the Japan Forum prasantrin mentioned that she found them in a matcha (green tea) flavor. I looked for this but couldn't find it. Do they have a green tea flavor in the UK?
This packaging is very typical Japanese packing, inside there are 4 separate packs of 3 cookies each.

I have no idea what hobnobs or Jaffa cakes are... :unsure:

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#76 jackal10

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 12:34 AM

They are biscuits also with the McVities brand. If McV is selling in Japan these treats maybe on the way...
Hobnobs are coarser textured. Jaffa cakes are a sponge, a dollop of orange jelly and a top layer of chocolate. They are so light they seem to evaporate if the top is left off the box. There was a big court case with the tax authorities a couple of years ago as to whether they were cakes or biscuits, as they attract different rates of sales tax that was settled in favour of the company, I'm glad to say.

#77 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 12:59 AM

They are biscuits also with the McVities brand. If McV is selling in Japan these treats maybe on the way...
Hobnobs are coarser textured. Jaffa cakes are a sponge, a dollop of orange jelly and a top layer of chocolate. They are so light they seem to evaporate if the top is left off the box. There was a big court case with the tax authorities a couple of years ago as to whether they were cakes or biscuits, as they attract different rates of sales tax that was settled in favour of the company, I'm glad to say.

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Here is their current Japan line up.
I have only seen the ones that I purchased today, the rest look really good though!

EDITED to add their line-up consists only of the two top rows...

Edited by torakris, 05 October 2005 - 12:59 AM.

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#78 jackal10

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 01:03 AM

Never seen green tea or apple - must be developed for the Japan market.

#79 pinkpau

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 02:09 AM

Hi Kris! What's in those cartons? Milk? And what's the small yellow box at the bottom? Very curious! :wink:

Hide's so adorable! :wub: Will you be featuring your two lovely daughters too?

#80 daniellewiley

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 02:52 AM

Waiting for photos of your dinner on the Dinner! topic in Cooking, Susan.  My kids said, after looking at my dinner picture (believe me, they've seen enough of the food porm photos on the Dinner! topic) "Mom, don't be mad when we say this.  But, your photos suck."  Ah, the confidence of youth!  I reminded them gently that many of the Dinner! posters don't have kids!  And, they are glad this time around that I am serving family style, and once they have served themselves, I plate mine and then photo my plate.  Last blog around, they got pretty tired of sitting quietly and waiting until I photoed everything!

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Make them do it!! Can they food style tonight's dinner for you??
I'm enjoying this blog tremendously - I love the time difference factor. We have nonstop blogging!
And Kris, those tempura zucchini flowers were truly outstanding - I can still taste them. If I didn't have an old, all wood kitchen with no ventilation, I would certainly have recreated them here!
Danielle Altshuler Wiley
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#81 prasantrin

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 03:09 AM

Here is their current Japan line up.
I have only seen the ones that I purchased today, the rest look really good though!

EDITED to add their line-up consists only of the two top rows...

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How funny that the regular digestive biscuits are newer in Japan than the baked apple ones! I've seen all of them except maybe the vanilla ones. I'm sad to see that the green tea ones are only available in 54g packages! Why oh why are there no large boxes of them? The cookies, themselves, are pretty small, too. They're about the size, or maybe a bit larger, than those snack-sized cheese-filled ritz crackers.

Also interesting, on the website it says the green tea ones were available from October 4, which was Tuesday. But I bought my first bag on October 1! I feel just like those people who managed to get the latest Harry Potter book earlier than everyone else!

#82 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 04:38 AM

Hi Kris! What's in those cartons? Milk? And what's the small yellow box at the bottom? Very curious!  :wink:

Hide's so adorable!  :wub: Will you be featuring your two lovely daughters too?

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Sorry about that! I forget not everyone reads Japanese... :hmmm:
The two cartons are low fat milk and the yellow box is butter, I buy milk and butter at my local drug store because it is quite a bit cheaper than at the supermarket.

Pictures of the daughters will be coming!!

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#83 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 04:59 AM

Weds dinner:
Dinner on the run

I teach an English class until 6:30 on Weds and my husband comes home about the same time, I like to have dinner on the table by 7:00 so these days are always a rush.
The easiest meals for me to get on the table fast are Japanese. I always have some kind of fish in the freezer, Japanese simmered dish taste wonderful at room temperature and pickles can always be prepared a couple hours in advance.

This week's co-op had some of my favorite pickles so I purchased them instead of making my own. :biggrin:

The fish and pickles for tonight's dinner

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Chinese cabbage pickle with yuzu (a Japanese citrus), and gobo (burdock root) pickle, the fish is saba (mackeral) that has been seasoned with mirin and sesame seeds.

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#84 Chufi

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:06 AM

The pepper dish was a new one for me.  I've been cooking out of Barbara Tropp's Modern Art of Chinese Cooking for years, and continue to find recipes I've never tried. 

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thanks for pointing this one out Susan. I have the same book, but for some reason it always seems a bit intimidating to me, and I rarely cook from it (although I read it - makes for great bedtime reading). Now I'm going to try this one I think!

Edited by Chufi, 05 October 2005 - 05:09 AM.


#85 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:06 AM

The fish is cooked in a fish grill that is built into the stove. Most Japanese homes do not have oven range combos, rather it is just the stove top range and msot often with a slide out fish grill. It looks something like this (sorry blurry picture)

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The finished fish

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There wereactually 3 fish but I took the picture before I piled the 3rd one on the dish because it just looked neater. The fish is eaten by placing the dish in the middle of the table and everyone just pulls off pieces with their chopsticks.

the pickles, sliced and ready to eat. Actually the kids were picking at them before I could take a picture.
Posted Image

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#86 snowangel

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:07 AM

Susan, I had forgot to ask, did you have any rice with that?

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No, we didn't have any rice. My rice cooker seems to be missing in action! Mine was an old National, which I got almost 25 years ago as a wedding present, and was not functioning occasionally, so my list for the trip to the Asian market tomorrow includes a rice cooker. (I know I could have made rice on the stove, but I was using all four burners)
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#87 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:18 AM

I took some frozen bamboo shoots and made a simple simmered dish called tosa-ni.
Ni is from the verb niru and means to to simmer, you will often see the word ni in the title of simmered dishes. Tosa is the old name for the modern day Kochi Prefecture in the southern part of Japan. The area is very famous for its katsuo (bonito, a type of fish) and thus many dishes that in include katsuo bushi (bonito flakes) have the name Tosa in the title.

Most Jaapnese buy pre-shaved flakes of bonito is plastic bags, but at one time everyone had to grate them by themselves at home from rock hard blocks of dried bonito.

This is the bonito block and the box used to grate them
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the grated bonito
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the finished dish
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the bamboo roots were simmered with dashi, soy sauce, sake, mirin and sugar then the bonito flakes (which had been lightly toasted in a frypan) were added.

The meal was rounded out with bowls of rice, tonight I did a mix of Japanese short grain with Korean black rice, Hide calls this purple rice and it is his favorite.
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#88 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:22 AM

we eat dessert a couple nights a week, sometimes as simple as fruit or ice cream other times I actually prepare something

tonight we ate the last of the gifts from my FIL's trip to Beijing, I have no idea what this was...
Posted Image

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#89 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:24 AM

That bonito shaving was so cool....
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#90 torakris

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:29 AM

9:30pm, it is already past my bedtime and I was up in the middle of the night last night rinsing out clothes after Julia had a bloody nose....
Why do these kind of things happen at 3:00am?

Handing it over to you Susan!!

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