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Doug Psaltis

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#481 rocketman

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 12:55 PM

There was an interesting radio interview with Doug Psaltis on the Restaurant Guys Radio the other day.  He comes off as not an especially likeable guy. 

Here is the link to listen to the interview  link

and since I am not sure if I am doing this correctly here it is spelled out

http://restaurantguy...asp?show_id=106

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Did you think the interviewers were acting even handed? Seemed to me they had an agenda. They did not discuss his dedication to the field at all which is a big big part of the book. They only wanted to discuss the negative publicity. Cant blame them as we all know scandel sells but lets be fair here.....Psaltis had no choice to defend himself and he comes off a little cocky in doing so. As i said in my last post, to me this brings a little credibility. All the greats.....athletes, businessmen, polaticians.....they are all cocky. Why not chefs? You may not like Trump but if he asked you to invest in a real estate deal with him, i know i would jump at the opportunity.

#482 wkl

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 01:02 PM

how do you know they leave quickly? just wondering.

#483 Jason Perlow

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 01:13 PM

There was an interesting radio interview with Doug Psaltis on the Restaurant Guys Radio the other day.  He comes off as not an especially likeable guy. 

Here is the link to listen to the interview  link

and since I am not sure if I am doing this correctly here it is spelled out

http://restaurantguy...asp?show_id=106

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If it wasn't for the fact that they own a successful restaurant in New Brunswick, the two interviewers sound like a bunch of small town smarmy jackasses. I like how they immediately take their pot shots at Doug right after he signs off. Utterly gutless. A real interviewer would have had the chutzpah to make those accusations when Doug was on the air.

Doesn't inspire me to visit their place one bit.
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#484 wkl

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 01:20 PM

they certainly did take shots at him when he was on the air.they called leaving adny on short notice a lame move, and said not respecting an employee giving notice akin to being a jerk.you should listen to it again.

#485 rocketman

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 01:54 PM

how do you know they leave quickly? just wondering.

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8 chefs in 10 years. cant be hanging out too long.

#486 rocketman

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 01:57 PM

they certainly did take shots at him when he was on the air.they called leaving adny on short notice a lame move, and said not respecting an employee giving notice akin to being a jerk.you should listen to it again.

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Actually you may want to listen again. He left Cello (Tourendal's place) for ADNY. He left ADNY to open MIx.....I thin ducasse probably new about that.

#487 DCMark

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:27 AM

Is this post a very early April Fool's joke? Tell me it is, the amount of windage flowing here is amazing. It makes all the snide comments about snobby 'foodies' ring true and makes EG look SAD.

Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour). I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds. Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

#488 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:38 AM

Is this post a very early April Fool's joke?  Tell me it is, the amount of windage flowing here is amazing.  It makes all the snide comments about snobby 'foodies' ring true and makes EG look SAD.

Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour).  I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds.  Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

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To which post are you referring?

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#489 tan319

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:51 AM

Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour).  I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds.  Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

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Thank you!!!
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#490 DCMark

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:54 AM


Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour).  I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds.  Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

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Thank you!!!

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My first day on the job as a prep cook at a nothing beach restaurant I got my ass kicked, stuffed in a trash can and locked in the walk in.

If the chef slapped my hand I would have been touched!

#491 dvs

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 10:07 AM


Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour).  I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds.  Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

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Thank you!!!

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My first day on the job as a prep cook at a nothing beach restaurant I got my ass kicked, stuffed in a trash can and locked in the walk in.

If the chef slapped my hand I would have been touched!

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doesn't make it right, though...

#492 DCMark

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 10:11 AM


Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour).  I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds.  Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

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Thank you!!!

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My first day on the job as a prep cook at a nothing beach restaurant I got my ass kicked, stuffed in a trash can and locked in the walk in.

If the chef slapped my hand I would have been touched!

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doesn't make it right, though...

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Doesn't make it wrong either. If you join the Marines you expect to be treated in a certain way. Its life. We legislate all non-conformity out of our little worlds while across the border people are in slavery. Perspective.

#493 dvs

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 10:20 AM


Some of you have this fantasy about what goes on in a kitchen (not during the times you get the VIP tour).  I am certain Keller's places are a cut above, but the drugs, violence, verbal abuse, etc that exist in restaurants would blow most of your PC minds.  Let it be, its the last bastion of creativity we have left.

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Thank you!!!

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My first day on the job as a prep cook at a nothing beach restaurant I got my ass kicked, stuffed in a trash can and locked in the walk in.

If the chef slapped my hand I would have been touched!

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doesn't make it right, though...

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Doesn't make it wrong either. If you join the Marines you expect to be treated in a certain way. Its life. We legislate all non-conformity out of our little worlds while across the border people are in slavery. Perspective.

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whoa... what a poor analogy... i hear lots of stories about people suing the marines for bad treatment. restaurants are lucky they don't get sued more often...
fwiw, i've worked in restaurants for the last 15 years & have seen it all...

#494 rancho_gordo

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 10:28 AM

Again, the point is what the author chose to disclose, not whether corporal punishment in the restaurant business is common, fair or justified.

Edited by rancho_gordo, 02 November 2005 - 10:29 AM.

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#495 Marlene

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 10:39 AM

The slapping incident has been done to death on this thread already. Let's move on please.
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#496 D. Peckham

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 03:26 AM

People, for the love of god, get over it. If you don't like what Doug has to say or agree with it don't buy the book or eat at his restaurant ( edit for the case that he is the Chef there and not the owner) Doug is a friend of mine and I admire his skill and dedication and I think that this book has alot more to it then one chapter. Every point has been made ten times over and it's getting really stupid.

#497 Bux

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 08:53 AM

. . . I think that this book has alot more to it then one chapter.  Every point has been made ten times over and it's getting really stupid.

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At risk of appearing like a complete idiot to you, I'd like to point out that more than one chapter has been criticized for what some people consider to be the lack of a complete account or a lopsided account of event all the way up to what some people consider complete and malicious fabrications. I have no need to repeat the comments I made earlier, but I dislike the attempt to bury criticism that was about more than the French Laundry incident by pretending it hasn't been made.
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#498 rocketman

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 12:53 PM

. . . I think that this book has alot more to it then one chapter.  Every point has been made ten times over and it's getting really stupid.

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At risk of appearing like a complete idiot to you, I'd like to point out that more than one chapter has been criticized for what some people consider to be the lack of a complete account or a lopsided account of event all the way up to what some people consider complete and malicious fabrications. I have no need to repeat the comments I made earlier, but I dislike the attempt to bury criticism that was about more than the French Laundry incident by pretending it hasn't been made.

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Bux,

You seem to have a real bone to pick with Psaltis here. What's up?

I mean when all the comments were made about how Psaltis was never the sous chef at Blue Hill you never once stepped up and said that statement was false even though Im pretty sure it was your daughter who wrote the article stating Psaltis was a Sous chef in NY Metro or Time Out and she had visited at the time it opened and had first hand knowledge of what had happened. While you could have contributed to the board in that instance you chose to remain silent, in my opinion b/c this would have been positive about Psaltis, but if that is not why, let me know....im super curious b/c your posts are all sooooooo negative.

What gives Bux?

RM

#499 Bux

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 02:54 PM

I thought I've been quite clear that I've restricted my posting to comments I can defend. I believe I already posted that the article in question stated that Doug Psaltis was sous chef and we can assume he was introduced as sous chef, or that he introduced himself as sous chef and no one corrected him on that. Whether it was a tilte in lieu of a better salary, a position of respect or what, we can o nly speculate and I've avoided speculation and innuendo as much as possible. Better than most, I think. What I may not have posted is that when I recently asked my daughter about meeting Doug Psaltis during the day she worked at Blue Hill as research for her article which was on ramps, not on the restaurant. In fact, I seem to recall she neglected to mention the restaurant's address or phone number, but Dan still talks to her. He's quite understanding of mistakes made by novices. My daughter at the time was working freelance in several positions at another restaurant and one of the reasons she chose Blue Hill to feature rather than one of the restaurants featured in the side bar with name, address and phone number, was that she didn't know anyone connected to the restaurant.

To make a long story shorter, the article was written in 2000 and when I spoke to her last month, she had no memory of Psaltis, which may show how important a role he appeared to play in the restaurant when she was there. Anyone who reads the article will notice immediately that Doug handles some of the prepwork with Alex and Dan and that he's cooking. It's Dan who works the pass and performs the job of chef on that day. Her article however, focuses mostly on Alex Urena. His background is the one given in some detail. He and Rick Bishop, the picker and seller of the ramps, are the two featured players. The interesting quote to me is about Alex. "Six months ago, he teamed with fellow Bouley Alum Dan Barber, who had lauched his own catering company in 1997 and was planning to expand into the restaurant business."

Rocketman, my life is a pretty open book and I sign all my posts with my real name. my posts are truthful, whether or not you find them negative. I won't ask you to indentify yourself as a gentleman or state your connections with anyone involved in the book as you have done to me, but my question to you is why do you say

Bux,

You seem to have a real bone to pick with Psaltis here.  What's up? 

I mean when all the comments were made about how Psaltis was never the sous chef at Blue Hill you never once stepped up and said that statement was false even though Im pretty sure it was your daughter who wrote the article stating Psaltis was a Sous chef in NY Metro or Time Out and she had visited at the time it opened and had first hand knowledge of what had happened.  While you could have contributed to the board in that instance you chose to remain silent, in my opinion b/c this would have been positive about Psaltis, but if that is not why, let me know....im super curious b/c your posts are all sooooooo negative.   

What gives Bux? 

RM

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I long ago posted that I knew Doug had been introduced as a sous chef.

This part of Alex Urena's account is particularly hard to swallow given the journalistic record. Urena says:

"He was helping us as a line cook," Mr. Ureña said. "We didn't want him to get the idea that he was going to be a sous-chef."


But in a Time Out New York article published in 2000, Doug Psaltis is specifically referred to as the sous-chef:

On the day I visit, sous chef Doug Psaltis arrives shortly after Urena.


Also:

Because Blue Hill is a relatively small restaurant—it has about 54 seats, bar not included—Urena, Psaltis and Barber do all of the preliminary prepping or "breaking down" of the vegetables, fish and meats.


The story is available online here: http://www.timeoutny....eat.ramps.html -- this, at least, would seem to be a bit of homework the New York Times didn't do.

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You know I read that article, several times over the years. I have a couple of copies in my library. What it says is that Doug was sous-chef, not Alex's co-chef as he says in his book. It goes on to say that Dan is the chef chef since he’s calling out the orders and working the pass, which is what the top chef in any kitchen does, and that Dan clearly knows his way around the kitchen if he’s breaking down vegetables, fish, and meats. Even the title sous-chef may be questionable in a new restaurant opening on a tight budget. It's often easier to give a title than a salary to boost the ego of one of the guys in a new kitchen. The author of that article was one of the few people who would talk to me at all. What she had to say is that she didn't have much memory of Doug. It seems to me that he wasn't one with much responsibility or input into the restaurant that took off big, quickly. Alex apparently did have much to do with the origninal success, but even there I have some questions. You and I never shared the same opinion of the restaurant. I felt it was a destination restaurant from early on and you didn't. More to the point I seem to recall that when Alex left, your predictions were negative and you expressed the view that Alex was the talent. I wondered why you had that misapprehension then. I better understand that today.

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I would define negativity not so much just as refuting someone else's statements, but as doing so without bothering to read what they've said or follow their statement. I would define negativity as putting words in someone's mouth, or worse yet, implying in public they've not said something they are already on record as saying. Why are you so intent on posting so vehemently on one subject on a site on which you never registered until this thread had long been underway? I have a track record here that speaks for itself and I put my reputation on the line with every post I make by signing them
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#500 rocketman

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 04:01 PM

Bux,

If your position is so transparent than why were you not forthcoming when you first mentioned the article written by your daughter. Instead you wrote:

"You know I read that article, several times over the years. I have a couple of copies in my library."

This is clearly evasive.

And can you believe I can rebut your post in all of 49 words....pretty amazing, huh?

RM

#501 winesonoma

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 04:20 PM

Perhaps sir you should reveal who you are as you seemed to have shown up suddenly as the defender of this book. I am merely a poster here and have a slight history. I really have little interest in this thread as I know none of the participtants. But to me you seem a little out of line.
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#502 Bux

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 09:54 PM

Rocketman,

There's was nothing evasive aboout honoring Fat Guy's decision not to mention the author. Fat Guy knew who wrote the article and chose not to use her name. It was his decision and I follwed suit by clearly acknowledging I knew exactly which article he meant. At any rate, her byline was on the web page to which Fat Guy linked for all to see. To quote Fat Guy once more, "The story is available online here: http://www.timeoutny....eat.ramps.html -" It's a pretty good article and no, my daughter doesn't need a literary agent. By the way, what's the relevance of the fact that the author of the article was my daughter? As I do, she signs her writing. We're both proud of what we say and do.

And what part of your amazing post did you think offered a rebuttal. What I did in my last post was rebut your statement that I never said brother Doug was sous chef. I said that early in October I posted that Doug had been referred to as a sous chef at the restaurant and I quoted the message in which I said that. My posts are long because no matter how many times I repeat myself, you ignore what I say. Doug wrote that "Peter" owned the restaurant he worked in with Alex Urena and he said that Peter wasn't a chef. I said Dan Barber owned that restaurant and the article that said Doug was a sous chef describes Doug's role in the kitchen as less than that of a sous chef. Dan is clearly described as the man in charge and handling all of the chef's duties. Can you rebut the error of the chef's name? Can you rebut the fact that Dan was in charge of the kitchen when my daughter was doing her research? It's clear you have an emotional attachment to this book, but are evasive about letting others know why.

Why does this seem like deja vu to me?
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#503 Dave the Cook

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 11:03 PM

We've tolerated lots of borderline off-topic discussion of motive, anonymity and disclosure in this topic, because in most cases it's been germane. It's less so now, especially since it revolves around factual issues that have been pretty thoroughly wrung out. New discussion points and/or new facts are welcome. Anything else is subject to deletion.

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#504 russ parsons

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Posted 10 November 2005 - 11:01 AM

I joined recently b/c this thread touched a nerve.  I have been reading egullet and fat guy (which i prefer) for years but never felt a reason to post.

If you look around though, you will notice that Ive posted in many other areas than this thread on many other things that strike my interest.

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this is the problem with the whole blind posting thing. i post under my own name because my momma taught me not to say anything behind someone's back that i wouldn't say to their face. this isn't true of all of our "nom-ed" posters: there are plenty of them, like fat guy, bux, pan, etc., who are very clear about their identities and, therefore, there special interests and potential conflicts thereof.

rocketman, you joined e-gullet 3 weeks ago. since then you've had 49 posts, 18 of which have been on this topic. and, if i may say (since i'm posting under my own name), most of those have been defenses of psaltis that have been at the same time vociferous and borderline incoherent.

without information to the contrary, this leads one to believe that you have some vested interested in the argument. the rest of us have been upfront, isn't it about time that you were?

Edited by russ parsons, 10 November 2005 - 11:02 AM.


#505 Marlene

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Posted 10 November 2005 - 11:47 AM

Rocketman has provided his real name, address and phone number to eGullet Society management, as all members are required to do. We don't require anyone to post under their own name and there may be many reasons why people do so.

It is not only inappropriate to badger them into revealing their personal information, but it's irrelevant to the topic of this thread.

Let's stick to the arguments, not the personalities. There have now been several posts from moderators asking for civility on this topic.

From now on, we will simply delete posts that cross the line and, if we don't get to them immediately, we'll also remove all posts that respond to them.

There won't be any more announcements like this, and if the administrative burden continues to grow we'll close the discussion.

As Dave said above if you have new information regarding the book which is the subject of this thread, then by all means post it.

Thanks.
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#506 Mikeb19

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 06:13 PM

I said Dan Barber owned that restaurant and the article that said Doug was a sous chef describes Doug's role in the kitchen as less than that of a sous chef. Dan is clearly described as the man in charge and handling all of the chef's duties.


In that article it says: "Urena, Psaltis and Barber do all of the preliminary prepping or "breaking down" of the vegetables, fish and meats."

I work in a very small fine dining restaurant (50 seats max), and it's quite common for the chef/sous-chefs to be doing this kind of work. None of the article "describes Doug's role in the kitchen as less than that of a sous chef". Maybe in a hotel a sous-chef wouldn't do this kind of labour, but in a 50 seater the chef and sous-chefs definitely would.

Edited by Mikeb19, 11 November 2005 - 06:22 PM.


#507 Bux

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Posted 12 November 2005 - 12:14 AM

I said Dan Barber owned that restaurant and the article that said Doug was a sous chef describes Doug's role in the kitchen as less than that of a sous chef. Dan is clearly described as the man in charge and handling all of the chef's duties.


In that article it says: "Urena, Psaltis and Barber do all of the preliminary prepping or "breaking down" of the vegetables, fish and meats."

I work in a very small fine dining restaurant (50 seats max), and it's quite common for the chef/sous-chefs to be doing this kind of work. None of the article "describes Doug's role in the kitchen as less than that of a sous chef". Maybe in a hotel a sous-chef wouldn't do this kind of labour, but in a 50 seater the chef and sous-chefs definitely would.

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The full quote to which you refer says: "Because Blue Hill is a relatively small restaurant—it has about 54 seats, bar not included—Urena, Psaltis and Barber do all of the preliminary prepping or "breaking down" of the vegetables, fish and meats." The co-chefs and sous chef are doing this work. The point I was making was that "anyone who reads the article will notice immediately that Doug handles some of the prepwork with Alex and Dan and that he's cooking. It's Dan who works the pass and performs the job of chef." Fair use practice and copyright law would prevent me from reposting the complete article here, but it will be clear to those who read the article that Dan is handling the chef's responsibilities while Doug is as far in the background as any sous chef might find himself. This is meant to refute Doug's contention in the book that Dan had little or no experience as a chef. That just simply flies in the face of what I saw when I was in the kitchen, what my daughter, who's worked in a couple of top NY restaurants prior to writing about food, saw when she was there and what others who have worked in Blue Hill have told me. Doug has been described as an honest fellow by those who may know him and most peculiarly by a few who have never met him, but felt the need to come to his defense here. What we haven't heard is support for his version of how things were at Blue Hill from anyone who was there with him for an hour, a day or the entire period of time he worked there. Alex was pretty clear when he was interviewed that he didn't support Doug's account. You may not know that Doug is lying, but you know you haven't heard support for his account.

I'm not saying Doug wasn't the sous chef. I belileve his title was that of sous chef, but on this day, his duties seemed limited and Dan is clearly described as being in charge of restaurant and working the pass during service. Doug's role was so limited that when I followed up asking my daughter who wrote the article in Time Out NY about what she remembered about being there--basically, she trailed Alex for a day--and it was that Dan was running the show. She didn't really remember anything about anyone other than Dan and Alex Urena. Was she competent to understand what was going on? She had been in charge of the pastry kichen for Terrance Brennan at Picholine and had worked under Daniel Boulud, Alex Lee and François Payard at the original Restaurant Daniel. She was then also currently free lancing for Daniel Boulud on a number of projects and trying her hand at writing. As I noted earlier, it was one of the few restaurants with ramps on the menu--ramps being the subject of the article--where she hadn't worked with, or knew the chef.
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#508 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 12 November 2005 - 08:57 AM

Having just finished reading the book I feel that even its highlights are somewhat tainted for me by the credibility gap which has been brought to light here. And before anyone jumps all over me, I'm referring specifically to the credibility gap presented by the author of the book himself, in this post. At the very least, it was a missed bet to not include such a seemingly important moment in the book. And I suppose, that at 31 years of age, the author may not possess the wisdom to understand the significance of the moment. Still, for me, the fact that the moment doesn't appear in the book leads to unavoidable questions about what appears (and what doesn't) throughout the rest of the book.

For example, there is another moment in the book where Psaltis describes a conversation he had with Thomas Keller in which he (Psaltis) tells Keller that he doesn't see eye to eye with Keller or his cuisine and that FL's food is more focused on visual elements than on flavor. Psaltis writes:

"I just don't think about food in the same way," I told him.
"What does that mean?" Thomas asked me.  And I explained to him that I thought a lot of the dishes were created with aesthetics as the primary goal and how enticingly they could be explained to a guest as the second consideration, that the sauces were meant to look bright and beautiful and that sometimes they ended up flavorless in this pursuit.  While I understood that other elements are important, I always think of food in terms of flavor and taste first.

It's a great moment and arguably the most dramatic one in the entire book but I find myself wondering whether it really happened the way it was described. Because of the omission referenced above, I can't help but get the feeling that Mr. Psaltis may not have a clear perception of himself. And even if one is willing to accept that his omissions and embellishments are entirely a function of the subconscious (and occur naturally or without any particular agenda), they diminish the value of this account for me quite a bit. And again, I don't know Doug Psalits. I'm speaking specifically about the book itself.

For all his accomplishments and clearly rapid ascent through the ranks, Psaltis is a relatively obscure figure. For me, that makes many of the personal details which appear in the book uninteresting. Perhaps if he were more of a star, I'd care more about his "on again, off again" relationship with Nora. Instead, the relationship as described, primarily lends credence to the possibility that Mr. Psaltis' interpersonal skills may not be well-honed. The relative self-isolation he describes throughout the book leads me to the same conclusion. Viewing the slap through that context, it's easier to see, perhaps, why it may have not been included in the book. It is entirely possible that the socially-underdeveloped Psaltis may simply have not understood how significant a moment it was. Still, if an author lacks that kind of wisdom, it doesn't bode well for the value of his memoirs -- even if the omission is a genuine one.

I did learn a bunch, however, from reading this book. I got a great feel for the ultra-competitive NYC restaurant scene -- from an angle I hadn't really enjoyed before. The details about Ducasse's operations are absolutely riveting. The sequence when Psaltis learns that he'll be going to stage at Louis XV in Monaco is a great one. And the time he spends in Monaco is well-described and quite interesting.

The bottom line for me is that the book raises a lot more questions than it answers. And that's not necessarily a bad thing, but I also don't believe it was the author's intention. As a relative neophyte to the world of fine dining and top kitchens, I was happy to have learned a quite a bit from reading it. I do wonder what we'll see in the future from Psaltis. Will he write another book? Will he, at some point, look back on this one with a more mature eye? As a chef, Psaltis surely may have been "seasoned" but as a person, he seems to have missed that same process. But then again, at 31 I could have easily said the same thing about myself . . . well maybe not, but others surely would have.

=R=
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#509 achinois

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Posted 14 November 2005 - 11:07 PM

I have been very hesistant to post on this forum because I have worked with Doug at many of the same restaurants. I know most of the chefs described in the book and are on good terms with them.

From what I know, while working at Bouley, Blue Hill and Mix, those events described in the book are true. About Blue Hill, these are the facts as I know it. Doug was the sous chef. Alex was co-chef. Dan was and is the owner and co-chef. Dan worked the pass. The food was cooked by those who created the dishes.

I was at Blue Hill before the first customers were served. The staff consisted of first-time owners, first-time chefs, first-time sous chef, first-time cooks, first-time general manager, first-time wine director, first-time waiters, and first-time busboys. Everybody was learning together. Blue Hill was about a dream and vision to be one of the best restaurants in the city. Those who didn't believe in it were gone within the first week. The rest of the staff worked hard to make it what it is today.

Dan has come a long way since the restaurant opened. He is a very smart man and has earned the respect of many people in the business. He has also gained the support of many rich and powerful people, some connected to the media.

I don't think Doug was out to personally discredit Dan, hence the name change, but just trying to decribe an event that influenced his career. There are other more negative things that could have been written, but the public doesn't need to know these things. Some things happen within the restaurant industry and don't need to be discussed or writtten about publicly, eventhough that's what the public wants. Maybe one day, when I'm not afraid of reprisals, I'll write a book about some of the things these chefs have done.

#510 culinary bear

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 02:44 AM

Make sure that when you do, it's not under a nom de plume, there's a good chap. :biggrin:

So would you categorise Psaltis' remarks and observations in the book as fair and reasonable comment, in as much as they tally with your own experiences?

Edited by culinary bear, 15 November 2005 - 08:33 AM.

Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."





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