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Buttercream question


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#31 chefpeon

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 05:52 PM

Ooooh....tough call, since I always like to be totally honest with clients, and not sneak anything past them.

But, like you said, she's overwhelmed. In all likelihood, you could probably tweak it and she won't even notice....I mean, brides usually take the first bite of cake with the groom, then spend the rest of the time mingling and such.

But I always lean toward honesty, because when you do, you always know you're in the right.
In her overwhelmed state, you could state your case like this:
"Hey, I know you're totally stressed....I don't want you to have to worry about the cake on top of everything else you're worrying about. I'm having problems with your buttercream recipe because of stability factors, but I know a couple tweaks that will totally solve the problem....it won't affect the taste. I just wanted to ok it with you."

And she'll probably say, "Yeah, sure OK....thanks for telling me."

I'll betcha. :wink:

#32 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 06:31 PM

I think chefpeon gave you some really solid advice!

#33 Kathyf

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 08:42 PM

I'm very familiar with this recipe because it's an old family favorite. We always have called it Waldorf frosting and it tends to separate and look a bit curdled after sitting at room temp too long. I've had really good luck whipping it for 5 to 7 minutes until it resembles a very stiff whipped cream, adding 2 tsp whipped cream stabilizer and whipping for another minute. If you can't find the stabilizer you can use 1/4 cup powdered sugar OR 2 T cornstarch instead. I prefer the stabilizer because it doesn't change the taste.
I'm not sure I'd trust Waldorf for wedding tiers though unless you can keep it chilled until shortly before the reception begins. It's held up well on sheet cakes so when a couple requests it for a wedding I suggest they use it on sheets. I realize sheets are used more commonly in areas like mine where weddings are large so that may not be a good option for you. Another option I've given couples is to frost the cake in another icing and left a bowl of Waldorf to be served with the cake similar to adding whipped cream at the last minute. Most wedding slices don't have a lot of frosting anyway and Waldorf is so good they'll be happier with a big spoonful.
Our family always used it for chocolate loaf cake - buttermilk pound cake baked and sliced like bread and smothered in Waldorf frosting. Its also used for red velvet cake in the midwest. I'd never heard of cream cheese on red velvet until I found the internet.

#34 K8memphis

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 08:27 AM

Chris, just wanted to say, let us all know how this plays out for you.
Best of the best to you.

#35 ChocoChris

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 07:03 PM

Chris, just wanted to say, let us all know how this plays out for you.
Best of the best to you.

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Thanks so much and thanks to all of you for your suggestions. I did tell the bride of the bc issue. She was ok with the idea of tweaking but not an entire replacement with a different bc. Unfortunately, she equates bc with the stuff that a grocery store puts on their cakes so she thinks of it as super sweet. As I don't have time to convince her otherwise and she doesn't have time either, I plan on using one of the variations posted here.

I'll let you know how it goes.

Chris

#36 MelissaH

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 08:33 AM

Would it be out of the question for you to make a small cake, of whatever variety she's going to be using, and frost it with whatever icing would make you happy but still be close to what the bride thinks she wants, and deliver that to the bride? (As far as decoration, I'd do either nothing or just a very simple border.) That way she would know what she's getting, and if there's been an accident, food is always good to have around.

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#37 SweetSide

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 09:39 AM

Just came across this old topic on one of my perusals and found it at exactly the right moment!

I just had to make this buttercream for the first time. Since it was the first time I made it I wanted to check with others...

My buttercream seems slightly "spongy" and I swear I can taste a slight undertone of the flour. I'm just so used to meringue or French (of the non-Wilton nomenclature... :wink: ) buttercreams, that I was really expecting this to be "fluffy" as described by others.

The formula was

2 c milk
6 T flour

cooked until "bubbling and thick". (I could see the pot bottom as I stirred with the spatula.) Cool. (when cool this was a medium firm mass)

Cream 1 1/2 c sugar and 2 c butter until fluffy. Add 2 t vanilla and beat until combined.

Add the cooled milk/flour mixture and beat until fluffy. I beat for about 15 minutes on KA 8 between the butter/sugar and the whole combined frosting.

My kitchen is only about 65F. Was my buttercream spongy because it was cool? Definitely had no melting/softness problems.

Other seem to like it -- was a big hit...

Thanks!
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#38 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 08:06 PM

It sounds like the typical frosting for a red cake. I wouldn't really call it buttercream..........more like a variation of one.

When I make similar, I can tell it has flour in it too. Theres no way around that. It's not a browned roux. And it's texture is 'different'/fluffy, that's because you're using the roux.

If you wanted something very similar you could use a pastry cream of your liking that had cornstarch not flour as the thickener. Sub out equal weights and continue the recipe as written.

Alot of people like this frosting because it seems less sweet and not rich.

* ps...........I don't know why I'm calling the cooked flour and milk a "roux"........it's something my Mom called it. Is there a proper name for that? Could I be spelling that wrong is it Roo? Roux is traditionally butter and flour................

#39 Sugarella

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 08:23 PM

* ps...........I don't know why I'm calling the cooked flour and milk a "roux"........it's something my Mom called it. Is there a proper name for that? Could I be spelling that wrong is it Roo? Roux is traditionally butter and flour................

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Yup, you got it right, it's a roux. Roux is any flour and fat mixture cooked into a paste to use as thickener.... technically milk has fat so I think the term is still correct in this instance.

Edited to add: Do those of you who use these icings actually like them and/or prefer them? I'm curious about them.... I use Nick Maglieri's buttercream and really prefer its taste and texture; previous to that I was using Sylvia Weinstock's, both of which I think are much better than RLB's Mousseline. If the flour leaves a taste in these icings, could you possibly sub something like potato starch or even rice flour????? I'm wondering if a flour icing could be modified so that it did hold together.......

Edited by Sugarella, 03 March 2006 - 08:26 PM.


#40 SweetSide

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 07:28 AM

It sounds like the typical frosting for a red cake. I wouldn't really call it buttercream..........more like a variation of one.

When I make similar, I can tell it has flour in it too. Theres no way around that. It's not a browned roux. And it's texture is 'different'/fluffy, that's because you're using the roux.

If you wanted something very similar you could use a pastry cream of your liking that had cornstarch not flour as the thickener. Sub out equal weights and continue the recipe as written.

Alot of people like this frosting because it seems less sweet and not rich.

* ps...........I don't know why I'm calling the cooked flour and milk a "roux"........it's something my Mom called it. Is there a proper name for that? Could I be spelling that wrong is it Roo? Roux is traditionally butter and flour................

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Wendy, You got it -- I'm frosting a red velvet cake, and I've not done one before. Since it was such a big hit with the people it was given to, especially the frosting, I'll not make any changes to it.

I think a part of the problem was the cold temperature of my kitchen as well and by warming the frosting I could have fluffed it up a bit more. The part I didn't like the most was how it was spreading.

* ps...........I don't know why I'm calling the cooked flour and milk a "roux"........it's something my Mom called it. Is there a proper name for that? Could I be spelling that wrong is it Roo? Roux is traditionally butter and flour................

View Post


Yup, you got it right, it's a roux. Roux is any flour and fat mixture cooked into a paste to use as thickener.... technically milk has fat so I think the term is still correct in this instance.

Edited to add: Do those of you who use these icings actually like them and/or prefer them? I'm curious about them.... I use Nick Maglieri's buttercream and really prefer its taste and texture; previous to that I was using Sylvia Weinstock's, both of which I think are much better than RLB's Mousseline. If the flour leaves a taste in these icings, could you possibly sub something like potato starch or even rice flour????? I'm wondering if a flour icing could be modified so that it did hold together.......

View Post


Sugarella, I haven't used any of the buttercreams you mention above, but just looked up Nick Malgieri's in Perfect Cakes. Looks like the typical swiss meringue buttercream that I use, which is my preferred buttercream at home.

I don't like to make IMBC much -- which seems to be more of a standard -- so I use SMBC. At home, with my mixer, the amount I need to make of the IMBC for one cake does not have enough meringue to really fill the mixer, so when I pour the sugar in, no matter how much care I take, it hits the shoulders of the whip and sprays around the bowl. If I dribble it down the side of the bowl, it leave a streak and clump of sugar syrup. No problems at school when I was making gobs of the stuff.

But those people who I give cakes to think the SMBC and IMBC are very rich. My husband called the icing I referenced above "not as greasy".
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#41 K8memphis

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 08:50 PM

The formula that I have used forever, is cook the milk, sugar and flour, then add the other stuff. In fact, the original says to add small pieces of real cold butter to the completely cooled cooked mixture. I would always refrigerate or freeze the cooked mixture and then add room temp butter. Mine tastes like ice cream, it is rich and less sweet than regular American buttercream. I never detected a 'made with flour' note in mine. I guess the sugar helps change the texture well enough.

Curious is that when you goggle french buttercream you get a variety of recipes including several of this variety and several offshoots and some with the yolks. This recipe is a buttercream as are the other ones. It is part of our cooking fabric.

#42 CaliPoutine

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:12 PM

I have a question about an Italian buttercream I made the other day.

I used the recipe in the latest issue of Fine Cooking, but I cut it in half.

I used
2 1/2 egg whites
1/2 plus 1/8 cup sugar
1 1/4 cups butter
1/4 cup plus 1tbls corn syrup.

Everything seemed to go ok, I dribbled in the sryup after whipping the whites. Then I incorporated the butter and added some vanilla paste and then at the last minute I added some homeade vanilla extract.

So then I tried to pipe it on my cupcake's using a star tip and it wasnt that stiff. Ok, no problem. I stuck the entire pastry bag in a glass and back in the freezer. I was able to pipe it, but it still wasnt that thick and it was flat.

I threw the rest in a tupperware and pulled it out that evening to frost a couple more and it looked really unattractive, it totally separated.

The client did hire me and I have to frost 60 cupcakes for a cupcake tree. Should I give up on the Italian buttercream and just go with a regular butter/powdered sugar deal or does anyone have a better suggestion?

Thanks!!

Edited by CaliPoutine, 14 March 2006 - 12:12 PM.


#43 sanrensho

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:27 PM

I threw the rest in a tupperware and pulled it out that evening to frost a couple more and it looked really unattractive, it totally separated.   


Did you try rebeating it at room temp? I've had some separation occur with IMBC after refrigeration.
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#44 CaliPoutine

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:38 PM

I havent done that yet, but I will.

That doesnt solve my problem about frosting the cupcakes for the party. I need a frosting that will be really nice and high when piped.

Know of any?

#45 SweetSide

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:39 PM

I have a question about an Italian buttercream I made the other day. 

I used the recipe in the latest issue of Fine Cooking, but I cut it in half. 

I used
2 1/2 egg whites
1/2 plus 1/8 cup sugar
1 1/4 cups butter
1/4 cup plus 1tbls corn syrup. 

Everything seemed to go ok, I dribbled in the sryup after whipping the whites.  Then I incorporated the butter and added some vanilla paste and then at the last minute I added some homeade vanilla extract.

So then I tried to pipe it on my cupcake's using a star tip and it wasnt that stiff.  Ok, no problem.  I stuck the entire pastry bag in a glass and back in the freezer.  I was able to pipe it, but it still wasnt that thick and it was flat.

I threw the rest in a tupperware and pulled it out that evening to frost a couple more and it looked really unattractive, it totally separated.   

The client did hire me and I have to frost 60 cupcakes for a cupcake tree.  Should I give up on the Italian buttercream and just go with a regular butter/powdered sugar deal or does anyone have a better suggestion?

Thanks!!

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Some thoughts --

Was the meringue mixture totally cool when you started to add your butter and the butter at room temperature? You don't want to have a warm meringue melt the butter or the mix will separate.

To me -- and I'll defer to others -- it seems like a lot of sugar/corn syrup to egg whites. But, I've never made a buttercream using corn syrup in the syrup mixture (I'm assuming the corn syrup was heated with the sugar to 242F..)
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#46 RuthWells

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 01:01 PM

Should I give up on the Italian buttercream and just go with a regular butter/powdered sugar deal or does anyone have a better suggestion?

Thanks!!

View Post


Don't give up on Italian buttercream! I haven't tried the FC recipe yet, but the one from The Cake Bible is very reliable, pipeable, and much more delicious than butter and 10x sugar. I have a picture in the What's for Dessert thread of a cake covered in flowers piped from Italian buttercream, if you want to see it in action.

#47 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 06:09 AM

CaliPoutine............that's an amazingly small amount to make. It would be a challenge for anyone to make that small of a batch well. I don't think you can judge it at all in that quantity.

#48 Tippy

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Posted 16 March 2006 - 02:00 PM

the first recipe in the thread I often use a variation of for filling cupcakes or small layers - it can be made to the almost exact texture as Twinkie cream.

As far as the last buttercream question - often the icing will separate - or look kind of curdled, and can be brought back to a creamy texture by vigorous beating.

If you want an icing to withstand hot summer temps, you need to sub in more shortening instead of butter, and a hi-ratio shortening, like Alpine will hold up about the best, but no cake like super hot temperatures.

the meringue buttercreams are wonderful - but risky in summer.

adding meringue powder to the icing sugar can sometimes help with the crusting and holding factor.

Also - adding a tablespoon of meringue powder to your dry cake ingredients can help lift a too-dense cake.

#49 CaliPoutine

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 05:08 PM

CaliPoutine............that's an amazingly small amount to make. It would be a challenge for anyone to make that small of a batch well. I don't think you can judge it at all in that quantity.

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Ok, I feel like a failure and I'm ready to cry. I was hired for an event on Saturday night. I had to provide 60 cupcakes. I stupidly made this frosting at 5pm and it failed( once again). The first time I tried the recipe from Fine Cooking( which btw, it didnt work for Marlene either). This time I tried RLB's mouselline buttercream. I removed the sugar syrup when it reached 248f. I poured it into the pyrex dish as instructed. Here is what my mess looks like. I ended up throwing it in the fridge and making the standard buttercream of butter and 10x sugar.

Posted Image
Posted Image

Posted Image

These pics are from tonight, I tried to rewhip it to no avail.

What did I do wrong? I've wasted 2lbs of butter( 3.79lb). Is there anything I can do with this mess?

#50 JeanneCake

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:13 PM

I can't tell from the first photo whether there's liquid in the bottom left corner or not.

When you added the hot syrup, how did you do it (slowly? quickly? what speed was the mixer at?) It may be that your meringue deflated/collapsed and so the butter didn't incorporate.

Do you have a blow torch? You could use it to warm up the sides of the bowl while the whip is on (speed 2 or 4) and see what happens. Or take some out and put it in a microwave safe container, and nuke it for 3-5 sec until soft and melt-y (like ice cream). Add this in a steady stream to the cold buttercream and let it go for a few minutes and see if it comes together. You can only do this once or twice before you end up with just butter in the bowl, though.

Edited to add: When I'm re-whipping buttercream, I use the paddle and try to have it as close to rm temp as I can (as long as it isn't ice cold)

Edited by JeanneCake, 05 April 2006 - 08:14 PM.


#51 Sugarella

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:21 PM

What is that creamy white liquid in your bowl!?!

Were the whites whipped to stiff peaks before you added the sugar syrup, and were you whipping the whole time you were adding it?

#52 sanrensho

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:24 PM

Also, what was the temp of your butter when you added it to the meringue?
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#53 CaliPoutine

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:33 PM

I can't tell from the first photo whether there's liquid in the bottom left corner or not.

When you added the hot syrup, how did you do it (slowly? quickly? what speed was the mixer at?)  It may be that your meringue deflated/collapsed and so the butter didn't incorporate.

Do you have a blow torch?  You could use it to warm up the sides of the bowl while the whip is on (speed 2 or 4) and see what happens.  Or take some out and put it in a microwave safe container, and nuke it for 3-5 sec until soft and melt-y (like ice cream).  Add this in a steady stream to the cold buttercream  and let it go for a few minutes and see if it comes together.  You can only do this once or twice before you end up with just butter in the bowl, though.

Edited to add: When I'm re-whipping buttercream, I use the paddle and try to have it as close to rm temp as I can (as long as it isn't ice cold)

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The whites were at stiff peaks and then I added the syrup with the mixer stopped. Then I turned it on for a few seconds, then added more sryup and then did the same thing. Then, it seemed ok. I started adding the room temp butter. I had taken the lb of butter and put it in a seperate bowl and mixed it for a minute. I started adding teaspoons. It just never came together

and yes, that is a syrup at the bottom.

I've had it in my fridge since saturday. No blow torch. Any other options? Can I just use the butter in a cookie recipe because basically thats all it resembles at this point.( plain lumpy butter)

Btw, I used fresh farm eggs, could that be a reason why? I also used some vanilla paste.

#54 sanrensho

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 09:18 PM

The whites were at stiff peaks and then I added the syrup with the mixer stopped.  Then I turned it on for a few seconds, then added more sryup and then did the same thing.  Then, it seemed ok.  I started adding the room temp butter.  I had taken the lb of butter and put it in a seperate bowl and mixed it for a minute.  I started adding teaspoons.    It just never came together

and yes, that is a syrup at the bottom.


I'll defer to the opinions of others, but the syrup should have been added with the mixer running. That would explain the puddle of syrup at the bottom.

Also, I don't think you need to whip your butter before adding it to the meringue. At least, I never do.
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#55 freddurf

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 01:29 AM

Although RLB's recipe says to turn the mixer off when pouring in the syrup, I just pour in a steady stream with the mixer running. The Kitchen Aid mixer seems to have a little area at the bottom that doesn't want to blend, this could be what's causing the pooling.
Don't worry, you are in good hands here! I had numerous batches fail before everyone here help turn me into an expert! I haven't had a failed batch since! (Thanks everyone!)

#56 Sugarella

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:33 AM

The whites were at stiff peaks and then I added the syrup with the mixer stopped.  Then I turned it on for a few seconds, then added more sryup and then did the same thing. 

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I think possibly you took too long adding all of the syrup, what with turning the mixer on and off again, and possibly by the end it was too cool to incorporate. I notice in picture #2 there seems to be some firmed up syrup stuck all around the sides of your bowl, which is a telltale sign that the syrup wasn't hot enough anymore to be incorporated into the mix, at least part of the time.

I haven't noticed fred's observation about RLB's instructions.... from memory I think it says to pour the hot syrup in a slow steady stream with the mixer constantly running, but he may be right...I've been up for 38 hours now. :blink: That's how I do it anyways, pouring in while the mixer is going.

As for that butter, just use it for something else. I'd smear it around the bowl first with a flexible rubber spatula to make sure there aren't any syrup crystals in it though, unless you don't mind crunchy butter. :smile:

As for whipping the butter prior to adding it.... I think this is in the same category as using room temperature butter....to each his/her own. My power went out one night and I had to make several batches of buttercream by hand, and cold chunks of butter worked just fine.

Edited by Sugarella, 06 April 2006 - 03:41 AM.


#57 SweetSide

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:45 AM

The whites were at stiff peaks and then I added the syrup with the mixer stopped.  Then I turned it on for a few seconds, then added more sryup and then did the same thing.  Then, it seemed ok.  I started adding the room temp butter.  I had taken the lb of butter and put it in a seperate bowl and mixed it for a minute.  I started adding teaspoons.    It just never came together

and yes, that is a syrup at the bottom.


I'll defer to the opinions of others, but the syrup should have been added with the mixer running. That would explain the puddle of syrup at the bottom.

Also, I don't think you need to whip your butter before adding it to the meringue. At least, I never do.

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I would agree with having the mixer running on a lower speed when adding the syrup. You have to find the "sweet spot" between the whip and the bowl so that you avoid both puddling and spinning the sugar around the sides of the bowl.

Also, you don't need to whip your butter before adding it to the meringue, but if you are new to making meringue buttercream, it helps to insure that the butter doesn't end up in chunks in the final buttercream, especially when adding butter that is too cold.

In looking closely at the picture, the liquid seems kind of yellow to me... As are the frosting clumps at the bottom of the bowl. Was the meringue cool when you added your butter? The bowl will start off scorching hot from the syrup. Don't start adding the butter until you can rest your hand on the bowl and have it feel body temperature. Otherwise, your butter will melt out.

Another thing, it doesn't look like you have much buttercream for the size of your mixer. As said in previous post, the smaller your batch, the harder it is to make. I see a lot of "stuff" stuck to the side of your bowl -- looks like syrup. What size mixer is that?

Stick with it -- once you get it, you won't go back to just butter and 10X!

ETA -- cross posted with Sugarella, so we are repeating ourselves here.

Edited by SweetSide, 06 April 2006 - 03:47 AM.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#58 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 05:01 AM

I don't know if I can add anything to this. Everyones already given you great advice. I'll just highlight a few things in hopes it might help.

I agree, pour your syrup into stiffly beaten whites while the mixer is going.

Stopping to put your hot syrup into a pyrex is a wasted step and could be enough of a delay to cause you problems. Youv'e got sooo little hot syrup that there just isn't a need to cool it before pouring into the eggs. Anyway, you want it to cook the eggs so that's not helping. I'm not always even gentle when I pour my syrup in, I don't drizzle, I get it in there.

If the syrup is too hot/over-cooked it will form rocks that don't incorporate into your eggs. You might have done that from what you wrote. Remember that the sugar keeps cooking in the hot pot. I also think that explains the water in the bottom of your bowl too...........syrup was too hot and hardened too much instead of mixing in. If you have clumps of sugar in your meringue, don't continue, don't add your butter. Throw that out and start again. It's also very possible that your thermometer is off a couple degrees, that happens alot.

Don't add any butter until the cooked eggs are at room temp. in your bowl. Later as you get better at this, you can use hotter eggs and colder butter to speed things up, but don't get into that yet. If I was to make that small of a batch, I would pre-whip my butter before adding it to the egg. Again, you've got such a small amount it's a handicap.

When you first add your butter it might look like the curdy look in your photo, but that should whip out into a smooth light/aire buttercream.

You can probably use that butter. Melt it in the microwave and strain it. See if you've got lumps in it? If so, the sugar was over cooked. But then just use the butter in something else. Make some brownied that call for melted butter or some cookies with it. Or make some lemon curd or cream and use that butter to fold in at the end.

#59 sanrensho

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 10:27 AM

I haven't noticed fred's observation about RLB's instructions.... from memory I think it says to pour the hot syrup in a slow steady stream with the mixer constantly running, but he may be right...I've been up for 38 hours now.  :blink: That's how I do it anyways, pouring in while the mixer is going.


Just checked and RLB's instructions do say to mix in a steady stream with the mixer running, when using a hand-held mixer. Then she goes on to describe a stop-start technique when using a stand mixer.

I've always ignored the latter instructions and poured with the mixer running. I also dispense with the pyrex glass step mentioned by RLB and have never had a problem.

Here's another good, long thread on buttercream.

Edited by sanrensho, 06 April 2006 - 10:32 AM.

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#60 CaliPoutine

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 01:14 PM

The whites were at stiff peaks and then I added the syrup with the mixer stopped.  Then I turned it on for a few seconds, then added more sryup and then did the same thing. 

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I think possibly you took too long adding all of the syrup, what with turning the mixer on and off again, and possibly by the end it was too cool to incorporate. I notice in picture #2 there seems to be some firmed up syrup stuck all around the sides of your bowl, which is a telltale sign that the syrup wasn't hot enough anymore to be incorporated into the mix, at least part of the time.

I haven't noticed fred's observation about RLB's instructions.... from memory I think it says to pour the hot syrup in a slow steady stream with the mixer constantly running, but he may be right...I've been up for 38 hours now. :blink: That's how I do it anyways, pouring in while the mixer is going.

As for that butter, just use it for something else. I'd smear it around the bowl first with a flexible rubber spatula to make sure there aren't any syrup crystals in it though, unless you don't mind crunchy butter. :smile:

As for whipping the butter prior to adding it.... I think this is in the same category as using room temperature butter....to each his/her own. My power went out one night and I had to make several batches of buttercream by hand, and cold chunks of butter worked just fine.

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I think I need to clarify, that I took those pictures last night after I had the ruined mixture in the fridge since saturday. It didnt look like that after I made it on saturday. I couldnt deal with it at the moment so I just threw it in the fridge.