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Demo: Puff Pastry


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39 replies to this topic

#31 danlepard

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 12:59 AM

So we've talked about butter, but what about flour? What sort of flour do you prefer for crisp pastry? All-purpose, or a mixture of bread flour and all-purpose, or even a dash of some other flour (cornflour, rice flour)? Occasionally I've read about the inclusion of a dash of cream of tartar in the dough. Has anyone tried this?

Dan

#32 MobyP

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 02:47 AM

Dan - I think this is just the feeble excuse we were all waiting for! :laugh: Do you have a puff recipe you can share with us? Possibly with glossy photos and free samples upon receipt of a s.a.e?

To your question, I have to say my knowledge of flours is miserable, but the pastry definitely improved once I started using the Doves organic all purpopse (after reading that Sean Hill used it). Something that intrigued me: I saw a video of a pastry chef preparing puff in a Parisian 3 star (L'Ambroisie) and his uncooked pastry was the most beautiful creamy white. In contrast, mine tends to have miniscule specks interlaced throughout the dough. I don't know whether it's ash or some other contaminent. What's the secret? Is there a better combination of flour to use in the UK, and would it be different in the US?
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#33 danlepard

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 05:09 AM

I don't really have one, not a favourite one. I think the recipe you're using, plus an egg yolk in the dough, maybe a touch of sugar, perhaps lemon juice rather than vinegar.
I'm really curious about the types of flour board users around the world prefer for their puff pastry - given that you want a certain amount of elasticity yet finish with a crisp texture. I remember when I lived in New York years ago that their were beautiful creamy white pastry flours available from Millers somewhere in the south. Just wondered if there has been any experimenting...

regards

Dan

#34 kitwilliams

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 08:13 PM

Okay, you guys are making me awfully curious and wanting to experiment. The recipe I use is the one I learned in school and I haven't deviated from it because I've had nothing but praise for it. And for the same reason, I haven't even looked at many other puff pastry recipes, so the addition of acid is new to me. Anyway, my recipe is very straightforward: bread and cake flour, butter, salt, ice water.

I am very curious about the addition of cream of tartar. Found this on the internet:

"Some formulas will include an acid ingredient such as lemon juice or cream of tartar. This will relax the gluten, prevent the dough from souring and have a whitening effect on the dough."

So that may be your answer for the whiteness of the dough you were referring to, Moby.

Haven't figured out who this website belongs to, but this page on puff pastry will be very informative for puff pastry novices and may even be of interest to those more experienced.

I'm having hand surgery tomorrow but with the Hobart and the dough sheeter, I should be able to do some experimentation while recuperating!
kit

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#35 cookman

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 11:06 PM

If you have an instant thermometer, one trick that I've learned is to start with the butter block at 60 degrees, and the dough at about 42 degrees (usually right out of the refrigerator). This seems to be the ideal temperature for the initial incorporation of the butter into the dough.

Edited by cookman, 29 September 2005 - 11:13 PM.


#36 miladyinsanity

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:24 AM

I don't know what I'm doing wrong, but this is the second time I'm making puff pastry from scratch, and this is also the second time the butter packet's tried to explode out of the dough.

Any ideas? I'm following MobyP's instructions.
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#37 rickster

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 11:59 AM

My guess is that the butter is too cold?

#38 miladyinsanity

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 12:24 PM

It's definitely not too cold. It's not Hard Hard. It sort of smushes out?

Maybe it's too soft?

But it's not splitting out of the four corners.
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#39 srhcb

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 02:07 PM

Sorry to interupt, but this idea came up on another thread, and I wonder if anyone had ever tried it?

SB (rolling challenged)

#40 miladyinsanity

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 01:33 AM

I don't think I dare to try that, not with my tiny pasta machine.
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