Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Vegetables & Produce Books

Cookbook

  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1 AndrewM

AndrewM
  • participating member
  • 76 posts

Posted 11 July 2003 - 11:20 AM

All this talk of farmer's markets and seasonal favorites has me looking to plug a gaping hole in my cookbook shelves. What are your favorite vegetable cookbooks? I'd like to get something relatively comprehensive that deals with seasonal, selection and storage info in addition to recipes.
For instance, anyone have any opinions on "Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini: The Essential Reference" by Elizabeth Ann Schneider or James Peterson's "Vegetables"? Farmer's market-type cookbooks? Specialized vegetable cookbooks, e.g., Greens, Salads etc.? (I'm not looking for vegetarian cookbooks. :wacko: ) Thanks!

#2 megc

megc
  • participating member
  • 140 posts
  • Location:Astoria, NY

Posted 11 July 2003 - 12:03 PM

All this talk of farmer's markets and seasonal favorites has me looking to plug a gaping hole in my cookbook shelves. What are your favorite vegetable cookbooks? I'd like to get something relatively comprehensive that deals with seasonal, selection and storage info in addition to recipes.

Andrew, I like "Chez Panisse Vegetables" by Alice Waters. Also "Greene on Greens" is a helpful resource. Neither are specifically vegetarian cookbooks.

#3 KNorthrup

KNorthrup
  • legacy participant
  • 762 posts
  • Location:Portland OR

Posted 11 July 2003 - 12:13 PM

The Victory Garden Fish & Vegetable Cookbook has a loyal following. It's out of print and used copies go for about $80. That's a full title, separate from the general Victory Garden Cookbook that is more widely available. I have a copy but haven't actually used it yet. Tempted to sell it instead.

It's vegetarian, but I do like my Moosewood Kitchen Garden cookbook because it does have quite a bit on storing etc. And most of the recipes are sides so there's no reason not to have them with meat. I do.

#4 carswell

carswell
  • participating member
  • 1,523 posts
  • Location:Montreal

Posted 11 July 2003 - 12:23 PM

I second Chez Panisse Vegetables, which, besides being full of information on varieties and cultivation and having many good recipes, is beautifully typeset, bound and illustrated. (The other night, however, I was surprised to find narry a word on jerusalem artichokes in it.)

Collectively, Marcella Hazan's various books are a veritable cornucopia of interesting vegetable recipes.

Edited by carswell, 11 July 2003 - 12:44 PM.


#5 mcdowell

mcdowell
  • participating member
  • 424 posts
  • Location:Austin Texas

Posted 11 July 2003 - 12:29 PM

Deborah Madison's Local Flavors: Cooking and Eating from America's Farmers' Markets.

I bought it for my girlfriend, but haven't let it out of my hands.

#6 Andrew Fenton

Andrew Fenton
  • participating member
  • 3,352 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 11 July 2003 - 12:40 PM

I have Peterson's book. I find that it treats a fairly wide range of vegetables, with some solid (though not outstandingly creative) recipes and approaches for dealing with them. The illustrations are quite good, especially those illustrating techniques (e.g. turning carrots and artichokes.) I like the book, though I'd want to compare it to similar veggie cookbooks before recommending it as The One To Buy.

#7 Basilgirl

Basilgirl
  • participating member
  • 885 posts

Posted 11 July 2003 - 01:10 PM

Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.

Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything has a nice veggie section.
I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

#8 bloviatrix

bloviatrix
  • participating member
  • 4,553 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 11 July 2003 - 01:16 PM

My current two favorite books for vegetables are:

Vegetables Every Day by Jack Bishop

and

The Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson

Actually, all of the Jack Bishop books are good references.

Verdura by Vianna LaPlace isn't bad either.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#9 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 11 July 2003 - 05:00 PM

Vegetables A to Z is a great book, but wouldn't really recommend as a vegetable cookbook, it doesn't cover the "common" vegetables and it is more heavy on information then recipes.
I do have to admit it is one of my favorite books, but I have yet to make a recipe from it.

I know you said not vegetarian but Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is really wonderful, it is usually the first book I go to when I can't decide what to do with a certain vegetable.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#10 NeroW

NeroW
  • participating member
  • 2,137 posts
  • Location:Kalamazoo, MI, but heart is in Chicago.

Posted 11 July 2003 - 05:09 PM

Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.

Word.
Noise is music. All else is food.

#11 AndrewM

AndrewM
  • participating member
  • 76 posts

Posted 11 July 2003 - 08:11 PM

I know you said not vegetarian but Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is really wonderful, it is usually the first book I go to when I can't decide what to do with a certain vegetable.

Yes, what I meant when I said not vegetarian was that I didn't want to make broccoli forests and the like, or require ways to get protein on the plate other than meat. :smile: Deborah Madison's books look excellent.

#12 Suzanne F

Suzanne F
  • legacy participant
  • 7,398 posts
  • Location:NY, NY

Posted 11 July 2003 - 08:21 PM

Schneider. Schneider. Schneider. Schneider.

#13 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,902 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 11 July 2003 - 08:37 PM

Schneider.  Schneider.  Schneider.  Schneider.

Oh, yes.

Vegetables A-Z is the best. Despite no sections on tomatoes or bell peppers, it's still the best.

Although, I've just bought Anatomy of a Dish (Diane Forley), which is a beautiful book with a very different approach -- cooking by plant family. Lots of information in this book, and heart-wrenchingly gorgeous photos.

#14 Suzanne F

Suzanne F
  • legacy participant
  • 7,398 posts
  • Location:NY, NY

Posted 11 July 2003 - 08:49 PM

Forley. Forley. Forley. Forley.


Yup, her, too. Wonderful, wonderful book.

#15 bloviatrix

bloviatrix
  • participating member
  • 4,553 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 13 July 2003 - 03:58 PM

Another book came to mind. John Ash's From the Earth to the Table. Although this isn't purely vegetable book, he celebrates the use of seasonal ingredients.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#16 inventolux

inventolux
  • participating member
  • 664 posts

Posted 13 July 2003 - 04:59 PM

Raw by Roxanne Klein and Charlie Trotter
Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:
http://planetgreen.d...tv/future-food/

Hope you enjoy the show! Homaro Cantu
Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant
www.motorestaurant.com

#17 Jinmyo

Jinmyo
  • participating member
  • 9,879 posts
  • Location:Ottawa, ON, Canada

Posted 14 July 2003 - 03:44 AM

Well, Charlie Trotter's Vegetables perhaps.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#18 jackal10

jackal10
  • participating member
  • 5,036 posts

Posted 14 July 2003 - 04:46 AM

Yoneda "The heart of Zen Cuisine"

#19 fresco

fresco
  • participating member
  • 3,330 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 14 July 2003 - 04:48 AM

Marcella Hazan can be a little didactic for some tastes, but she does know and love her vegetables--pretty well any of her books, but especially Classic Italian Cooking, treat vegetables reverently and imaginatively.
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#20 Jinmyo

Jinmyo
  • participating member
  • 9,879 posts
  • Location:Ottawa, ON, Canada

Posted 14 July 2003 - 07:02 AM

Yoneda "The heart of Zen Cuisine"

Yes, this is a charming book by the abbess of a Rinzai Zen nunnery that serves shojin ryori kaiseki. Very simple and approachable seasonal menus and recipes with great and useful photographs.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#21 Jim Dixon

Jim Dixon
  • participating member
  • 1,327 posts
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

Posted 14 July 2003 - 09:26 AM

Red, White, and Greens by Faith Willinger...Italian take on cooking vegetables

Jim
olive oil + salt
Real Good Food

#22 spham3

spham3
  • participating member
  • 3 posts

Posted 28 August 2005 - 03:24 PM

I've been looking for lists/charts of produce that's in season by month or season. Online links or books will work. Any help would be great.

#23 markk

markk
  • participating member
  • 1,630 posts
  • Location:Northern NJ

Posted 28 August 2005 - 04:21 PM

There's a wonderful book called "Produce - a Fruit and Vegetable Lover's Guide"
by Bruce Beck with fantastic color photos (one page per fruit or vegetable), and a chart of each item's seasonal availability - and I know you can pick up a copy used on half.com for around five or 6 bucks.
Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”
Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”
Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”
Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

#24 snowangel

snowangel
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 8,140 posts
  • Location:Twin Cities, MN

Posted 28 August 2005 - 05:43 PM

It all depends on where you live.

Most states' Dept. of Ag. have some sort of guide, as do large local farmer's markets.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#25 Gifted Gourmet

Gifted Gourmet
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,587 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, Georgia

Posted 28 August 2005 - 06:34 PM

one of my favorite charts: Nutritiously Gourmet :wink:
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#26 rgruby

rgruby
  • participating member
  • 687 posts

Posted 28 August 2005 - 09:07 PM

It all depends on where you live.

Most states' Dept. of Ag. have some sort of guide, as do large local farmer's markets.

View Post


For example, here in Ontario we have: http://www.foodland....vailability.htm

I think the book Flavor by Rocco DiSpirito (yeah, that Rocco) has a chart in it that lists produce by the seasons, but also has a list of things that were once seasonal but are now available in decent quality pretty much year round (such as oranges. lemons etc) either due to long distance transport or greenhouse growing. A bit of a different take on the idea of seasonal, but (for certain things) a valid one.

Cheers,
Geoff Ruby

#27 newguy

newguy
  • participating member
  • 205 posts

Posted 28 August 2005 - 09:17 PM

Try reading culinary artistry. It supplies you with seasonal produce and proteins, along with what spices/flavors wise are compatable.

Nice book.

#28 M.X.Hassett

M.X.Hassett
  • legacy participant
  • 1,074 posts
  • Location:Bergen County NJ

Posted 30 August 2005 - 09:19 AM

The current issue of "Wine Spectator" (sept) has a pretty good one.
Matthew Xavier Hassett aka "M.X.Hassett"

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters-it is vulgarly called bittered sling and is supposed to be an exellent electioneering potion..."
- Balance and Columbian Repository. May 13, 1806

#29 NYC Mike

NYC Mike
  • participating member
  • 540 posts
  • Location:Alpharetta, GA

Posted 06 April 2006 - 11:31 AM

Hi All,

I didn't have any luck searching. Does anyone know of a book or website that has items organized based on their seasonal best availability? The Chez Panisse books do it in a limited way for veggies and fruit. Is there a "bible" on this subject or is it live and learn.

Thanks!

-Mike
-Mike & Andrea


#30 Gifted Gourmet

Gifted Gourmet
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,587 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, Georgia

Posted 06 April 2006 - 11:39 AM

one source but simplistic

more from Seasonal Chef


Hope this helps ... :wink:
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Cookbook