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Fresh/Stuffed Pasta & Gnocchi--Cook-Off 13

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#91 Smithy

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 08:24 AM

That looks really good, Charlie O. While I'm on a pasta kick right now (glad you liked it, Susan!) I may be trying potato gnocci soon myself. Your photos and comments are as encouraging as Susan says mine were! :cool:

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#92 EdtheMLB

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 08:52 AM

For the life of me, I couldn't figure out how to use that Atlas hand-cranked machine with only two hands. Indeed, I needed four in my house: one to stabilize the machine (the clamp didn't work with any of the surfaces in my kitchen), one to crank, one to feed the dough, and one to remove the pressed dough or cut pasta. Now I only need two hands -- and that machine can roll far more quickly than I ever could with that crank.


I saw this on Good Eats w/ Alton Brown and I've tried it myself. Try clamping your hand cranked pasta maker to an ironing board. Its the perfect length for the sheets of pasta. I just lay a bed sheet on the board before clamping so no flour remains to ruin my work shirts later. I also found that the clamp requires a thick surface so I used 1) folded newspaper or 2) small piece of wood.

Edited by EdtheMLB, 09 September 2005 - 08:52 AM.


#93 daniellewiley

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 11:51 AM

For the life of me, I couldn't figure out how to use that Atlas hand-cranked machine with only two hands. Indeed, I needed four in my house: one to stabilize the machine (the clamp didn't work with any of the surfaces in my kitchen), one to crank, one to feed the dough, and one to remove the pressed dough or cut pasta. Now I only need two hands -- and that machine can roll far more quickly than I ever could with that crank.


I saw this on Good Eats w/ Alton Brown and I've tried it myself. Try clamping your hand cranked pasta maker to an ironing board. Its the perfect length for the sheets of pasta. I just lay a bed sheet on the board before clamping so no flour remains to ruin my work shirts later. I also found that the clamp requires a thick surface so I used 1) folded newspaper or 2) small piece of wood.

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I love this idea!!!!!
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#94 Smithy

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 10:47 PM

Tonight's experiment: pasta stuffed with crab cake mixture.

I mixed up some crab cake, er, mixture based on a recipe from Frank Stitt's Southern Table. The general ingredients were crab, lemon juice and zest, bread crumbs, shallot, other seasonings, and egg. I made a few adjustments to his recipe - more lemon, a touch of vinegar, some chives - no doubt to compensate for the fact that I was using cooked shredded crab from a foil pouch instead of really good stuff. By the time I was done messing with it, the mixture tasted pretty good. I whirred it to a fine grind in the food processor.

The pasta dough was left over from my attempt 2 nights ago. It's been sitting in the refrigerator, wrapped tightly in Saran Wrap. Rolling went smoothly. In accordance with my lessons learned last time around, I cut each dough quarter into two pieces, so I was working with 1/8 of the original recipe at a crack. That made the dough MUCH more manageable as I got it rolled down to the thinner levels. I also took a note from the previous lesson and only rolled it to level 7 on my Atlas, instead of level 8 as recommended.

I tried two shapes, and if I'm reading my book right, they qualify as pansotti (pot-bellied dumplings) and cappellitti (little hats). Please correct me if I'm wrong. Here's how they looked before cooking:
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Into the boiling water they went. They were well on their way to being cooked before I remembered that the instructions said to simmer, not to boil. I don't know whether that mattered. They never stuck together.

As before, I didn't have time to do an interesting sauce, so the cooked pillows were tossed with melted butter, and then given a grating of freshly-ground pepper and salt. I didn't even think of cheese! I thought of herbs, but couldn't be bothered. Behold: crab-stuffed pasta tossed with melted butter.
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Here's a closeup, so you can see what the interior looked like:
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The flavor and texture of the stuffing were good. I was pretty happy about that.

The sauce wasn't bad but could have been better. What would y'all have done with that, both for flavor and for looks?

Now, here's the kicker: the pasta was tough and, well, doughy. It wasn't bad where it encased the crab mix, but those long triangle points were a bit much. It wasn't quite as noticeable with the hat shapes. I have 3 guesses as to why the pasta was different than last time around, since it was from the same batch. I may find the answers through experimentation, but I always favor the lazy approach: if someone already knows the answer, please help me out!
Guess 1: Pasta dough likes to rest a bit, but not for 48 hours. It got too tough. I did notice, when I got it rolled out to the final setting (7), that it contracted slightly on the board when I laid it out. I didn't see that the other night.
Guess 2: I really did need to roll the pasta out thinner, to level 8, even though I might have had to double in some portions because of tearing.
Guess 3: The shape makes a difference, and the round pillows I made the other night didn't have large enough expanses of sealed pasta (as with tonight's points) for me to detect the toughness.

What do you think?

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#95 MobyP

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 11:07 PM

You guys are doing great stuff. This is really riding a bike. It seems ridiculous and impossible at the beginning, but after 2 or 3 tries, you just won't remember what all the fuss was about.

I've played the "chasing the Steve McQueen-like egg as it makes a break through the neutral Switzerland-like mounds of flour while being chased by the insidious nazis" many times. Nothing quite like cleaning eggy-dough gloop out of the cracks of your wooden floor. Then I realised that I wasn't an italian grand mother, despite my penchant for sack cloth, facial hair, and over-sized black dresses, and these days I use a big bowl.

As for dough thickness, with experience you can start setting the machine to increasinly thin settings - but don't be too hard on yourself. Or, alternatively, go and buy some industrial 'fresh' ravioli from the store and place it next to your own. It will taste like shoe leather, and be at least twice as thick. Really, you'll feel good about what you're doing, and it will save you hundreds of bucks in psychoanalysis.
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#96 Smithy

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 06:45 AM

You guys are doing great stuff. This is really riding a bike. It seems ridiculous and impossible at the beginning, but after 2 or 3 tries, you just won't remember what all the fuss was about.

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I'm starting to believe that! :biggrin:

As for dough thickness, with experience you can start setting the machine to increasinly thin settings - but don't be too hard on yourself. Or, alternatively, go and buy some industrial 'fresh' ravioli from the store and place it next to your own. It will taste like shoe leather, and be at least twice as thick. Really, you'll feel good about what you're doing, and it will save you hundreds of bucks in psychoanalysis.

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That's good encouragement, and I already believe you. Even with my cavils about the dough thickness and toughness, I went to bed last night thinking that this was STILL, by a long shot, better than anything I've ever bought fresh in the grocery store. And as for those dried tortellinis, stuffed with dried pesto or chicken or whatnot: well, they've just been relegated to camping food.

I still have some specific questions that haven't been addressed. I logged on this morning planning to go over to the Q&A session and repost them there, but hey - since you're looking in, MobyP, and I raised them here, I'll repeat them here first.

1. How, and for how long, does one drain these beauties? With store pasta I'd just empty the pot worth into a colander and let it drain. I'm afraid these are too tender and/or will stick, although they haven't shown signs of doing that yet. I've been handling them gently (fish out one at a time, set lovingly in the colander) but they aren't sitting long enough to drain well. Am I babying them too much?

2. Why did the dough seem tougher the second try than the first? It was the same batch. Here are the (known) differences between the uses:
- Dough used the first night had maybe 45 minutes to rest, wrapped in plastic in the refrigerator; leftovers sat wrapped in same plastic another 48 hours
- Dough not rolled out as thickly the second time (1 gauge thicker on Atlas);
- Pillow shapes different, so second night's pasta had more unfilled dough than first night's.

Enquiring minds really want to know, and all that. I noticed that the dough was more elastic - that is, shrank slightly after rolling - the second time. Maybe the gluten had developed more. I used pastry flour (low protein).

MobyP, your course and Chris, this thread have really fired me up. I had some wonderful stuffed pasta last weekend that I want to try duplicating. Thank you so much.

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#97 Chufi

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 07:06 AM

The sauce wasn't bad but could have been better.  What would y'all have done with that, both for flavor and for looks?

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Because there were chives in the stuffing, I think melted butter with snipped chives and lemon juice would have been nice. They look great though!

Now, here's the kicker: the pasta was tough and, well, doughy. 

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My first guess would be that the dough had been around too long. But also, maybe you did not cook them long enough? I know fresh pasta does not need to cook very long but I have found that they always take longer than you think. I keep testing them while tey're cooking, because the amount of time they have to cook seems to vary a lot.

You guys are doing great stuff. This is really riding a bike.

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But, far, far more addictive. I just made a batch with pressed parsley leaves for tonight's dinnerparty. Stay tuned...

#98 Smithy

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 07:25 AM

The sauce wasn't bad but could have been better.  What would y'all have done with that, both for flavor and for looks?

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Because there were chives in the stuffing, I think melted butter with snipped chives and lemon juice would have been nice. They look great though!

Now, here's the kicker: the pasta was tough and, well, doughy. 

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My first guess would be that the dough had been around too long. But also, maybe you did not cook them long enough? I know fresh pasta does not need to cook very long but I have found that they always take longer than you think. I keep testing them while tey're cooking, because the amount of time they have to cook seems to vary a lot.

You guys are doing great stuff. This is really riding a bike.

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But, far, far more addictive. I just made a batch with pressed parsley leaves for tonight's dinnerparty. Stay tuned...

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Thanks Chufi. That raises a related question: how does one know when these things are done, and what happens if they're overcooked? In other words - when in doubt, is it better to leave them in longer or pull them out early? I kept trying to finger them (ouch!) or poke the edges, but really was guessing about the "al dente" feel.

The snipped chives are a GREAT idea. I thought they needed something green.

Looking forward to your photos and results!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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#99 MobyP

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 08:27 AM

Thanks Chufi.  That raises a related question: how does one know when these things are done, and what happens if they're overcooked?  In other words - when in doubt, is it better to leave them in longer or pull them out early?

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I used to pull one out after a couple of minutes, and nibble a corner to see - but no matter how I judged it, at the end I wasn't getting the mouth feel I was looking for. This was solved by almost halving the cooking time. If they're fresh, and thin, it's sometimes as little as 2 or 2 1/2 minutes. My basic rule is to pull them out at least 30 seconds before I want to. Also, I lift them out with a spider and place them straight into a warmed bowl, or into a saute pan with the melted butter. What you should never do is drain them like regular pasta in a collender - they're too fragile, and you'll end up covering them in the left over semolina flour which you used to dust them after construction.
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#100 Mottmott

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 03:26 PM

Hey, I have the leftover dough in the refrigerator.  Can I freeze this stuff?

Comments and questions welcome.  This was fun, and I'll be doing it again soon.

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I'm sure everyone was so in awe of your wonderful pix that they missed your question about freezing the dough. I'd like to know, too. Sometimes, I'm just too tired or out of time to do the whole batch at once.
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#101 Mallet

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 07:02 PM

Re: flour types. In "Simple Italian Cooking" Mario Batali recommends blending 80% cake flour and 20% all purpose flour to approximate 00 flour when making fresh pasta (he also mentions a protein content of between 8 and 11 %).
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#102 MobyP

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 12:34 AM

I wouldn't freeze it - but I don't know that you couldn't. It would just take much more time to defrost the dough, than it would to make another batch, and I'm lazy enough to go for the quick option.

You know, I haven't found a city in the states (or at least on the two coasts where I lived) where I couldn't find '00' flour. Any self-respecting Italian deli should have it, though sometimes you need to track them down.
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#103 Chufi

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 12:56 AM

OK, so I did the pressed leaf thing yesterday. I made a stuffing from mushrooms, dried porcini, and leeks. Pressed a tiny parsley leaf between two sheets of pasta to make the top sheet. Here's what they looked like raw (this pic was actually taken this morning of some of the leftover pasta, that's why it looks rather leathery)
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it looked beautiful, my husband said they were like fossils :biggrin: .It was quite fiddly to make them. You have to put little piles of filling on one sheet with the exact distance between them that the leaves on the other sheet have between them otherwise the leaves don't end up exactly on top of the stuffing.
Anyway, it was a bit disappointing that when they were cooked, the visual effect sort of wore off :
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This was fun to do but not something you would do often I think. The stuffing, however, was one of the best sofar. Mmm porcini!!

Edited by Chufi, 11 September 2005 - 12:58 AM.


#104 Chris Amirault

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 05:35 AM

Klary, can you give us rough ratios in your filling? I was thinking about making something along those lines, but I always fear wet fillings with fresh mushrooms.
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#105 lexy

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 08:19 AM

Does anyone know how to make flavoured/coloured pastas (i.e. the red tomato and green spinach ones you can buy dried in stores)? I'm guessing you just add some spinach water or tomato juice to the dough, and adjust the flour accordingly …
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#106 JasonTrue

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 09:53 AM

Some of those are actually just food coloring, and some are actually from food sources.

I sometimes color neri-miso with mortar-and-pestle-smashed blanched spinach. The same should work for pasta. You could theoretically use any blanched greens. For red, I would try the double- or triple-concentrated tomato paste that comes in a tube. And you could always use squid ink, which is classic. Most commercial vegetable-sourced red pastas are using the juice of boiled beets, even if they have some tomato in them, probably because tomato will eventually turn brownish.

However, tomato juice or spinach water will likely not contribute enough color to do anything other than turn your pasta a different shade of yellow or hinted pink.

Does anyone know how to make flavoured/coloured pastas (i.e. the red tomato and green spinach ones you can buy dried in stores)? I'm guessing you just add some spinach water or tomato juice to the dough, and adjust the flour accordingly …

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Edited by JasonTrue, 11 September 2005 - 09:54 AM.

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#107 Chufi

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 10:31 AM

Klary, can you give us rough ratios in your filling? I was thinking about making something along those lines, but I always fear wet fillings with fresh mushrooms.

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I used 200 grams of mushrooms, the white part of 1 fat leek, 1 shallot, 1 clove of garlic, a couple of pieces of dried porcini. About 1 tablespoon of parmesan was added after I blended the whole thing.

The leeks, shallots, garlic and reconstituted porcini were sauteed in butter until soft. I dry-fried the mushrooms before adding them to the blender. Dry-frying mushrooms is my favorite way of treating them before adding them to any dish that calls for concentrated mushroom flavor:
Put mushrooms (whole is best, but you can chop them up if you are in a hurry) in a large frying pan. They should be in a single layer. Don't add any fat. Put pan on high heat and fry the mushrooms over high heat until they are completely brown, collapsed, and wrinkled. Shake the pan occasianally (which is when you will hear that funny squeaky sound of the evaporating liquid).
It's amazing how long they can take over high heat before burning. When they're done, they are dry - so you don't have to worry about the wet filling :biggrin:

#108 Susan in FL

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 11:07 AM

A side note:
Ahhh, Klari! That's the tried and true method I use for mushrooms almost all the time -- for whatever. I never applied a term to it, so thanks! As a side of sauteed mushrooms with steak for example, I "dry-fry" :smile: them and add butter at the end before serving. It's how I cook peeled shrimp for several dishes, as well. It's amazing how good some things can be just cooked in their own essence and that's all.
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#109 Susan in FL

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 05:33 PM

"We" made pasta last night. I was thrilled! It turned out perfect.
I put we in quotes because Russ did most of it. I probably would not have participated in this cook-off if he hadn't been the one to make the pasta. I become afraid of failure when it comes to anything that requires kneading.
So anyway, we got out my late parents' 50-plus year-old pasta maker, conveniently hooked it on to the end of our kitchen counter/bar, and Russ went to work. He used half semolina flour and half unbleached all purpose flour, eggs, cold water, olive oil and salt. He mixed it up in a bowl, and kneaded it right on the counter... using no flour for dusting whatsoever, throughout the process! What was up with that, we don't know.

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We planned on spaghetti or fettuccine with a very, very simple marinara because we wanted to feature the pasta and enjoy its taste. Here are some action shots. :biggrin:

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We experimented a little.

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It ended up being fettuccine.

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I made a clean-out-the-fridge salad, to go with it.

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We enjoyed the dinner and the success.

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Thanks to all for the lessons and discussion. We're looking forward to making pasta again soon -- maybe ravioli!
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#110 Smithy

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:00 PM

Klary, can you give us rough ratios in your filling? I was thinking about making something along those lines, but I always fear wet fillings with fresh mushrooms.

View Post

... Dry-frying mushrooms is my favorite way of treating them before adding them to any dish that calls for concentrated mushroom flavor:
Put mushrooms (whole is best, but you can chop them up if you are in a hurry) in a large frying pan. They should be in a single layer. Don't add any fat. Put pan on high heat and fry the mushrooms over high heat until they are completely brown, collapsed, and wrinkled. Shake the pan occasianally (which is when you will hear that funny squeaky sound of the evaporating liquid).
It's amazing how long they can take over high heat before burning. When they're done, they are dry - so you don't have to worry about the wet filling :biggrin:

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This tip, alone, is worth its weight in the time and trouble I've put into cooking since I discovered eGullet. I've never heard of dry-frying mushrooms before tonight, much less tried it. The aroma was fabulous, the flavor even better, and the squeaks were high entertainment unto themselves.

Thanks, Klary!

Edited by Smithy, 12 September 2005 - 09:47 PM.

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#111 Smithy

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:46 PM

Tonight I made ravioli stuffed with braised beef with sauteed onions, dry-fried mushrooms (THANK YOU, CHUFI!) and assorted seasonings, in a mustard cream sauce. Mindful of the past lessons and MobyP's comments both here and on the eGCA stuffed pasta Q&A, I made the dough stiffer than last time around.

I think I may be at the point where it would help immensely if someone were physically at my elbow, saying "Here, poke this. Now try that. See what I mean?" Alas, all I have are photos and suspicions. (Sounds like a murder mystery, doesn't it? :raz: ) I just have to keep experimenting. The good news is that it all is edible, and far better than edible - just not the quality I'm after.

My dough was stiffer than last time. It rolled out pretty well, but it tore in places it hadn't before. I think that means it was still wet! Yes or no? See below for photos.

I rolled it out to #8 on the Atlas, being more daring than last time, but I ended up with tears in the top layer of the ravioli that had to be patched with double layers. Not all tore. When you look at the photos, you'll see where some stuffing showed through and some didn't.

The stuffing was braised beef ribs started last night, allowed to rest, defatted, recooked. In the meantime I sauteed some onion, ground up some horseradish and celery, and dry-fried some portabellas. It all went into the food processor and then was adjusted for seasoning (a bit of Worcestershire here, a touch of pepper there, etc.)

The beef, chopped and simmering the second time:
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The portabellas, dry-fried (what a marvelous truk) and quartered:
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The stuffed pasta before cooking:
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MobyP, or anyone else, does this texture look right? It isn't as flaccid as last time, but still may not be as firm as Moby's in the course photos. You can see in a couple of ravioli where I had to double the dough; that's a patch.

Dinner! Beef ravioli with mustard cream sauce, scattered with chives. Ground pepper came after the picture. This was supposed to be on a bed of greens, but it got too late and too disorganized. The sauce broke, too.
Posted Image

Looks pretty good, in an amateurish way, doesn't it? It tasted pretty good, too. There were a couple of quibbles with it. Aside from the missing bed of greens, the sauce was too oily. The first helping was fine, the second helping we could both tell it was oily. Didn't stop us from finishing it off, though. :biggrin:

The other problems were more subtle. Russ said the pasta was soggy, I thought it didn't have the firm pillowy shape, with the wonderful al dente resistance followed by a firm tasty filling. See how flat and rumpled the ravioli are? Is that because the filling was too lumpy, there were air pockets, the pasta was too limp, or something else? Would these be more firm if they'd been packed with the use of a mold?

The broken sauce annoys me, but that's beside the point, although it's related to being too oily. I'm more intent on the pasta right now.

I have in mind an ethereal meal I had recently at an Italian restaurant. A number of us had ravioli of various types: smoked salmon, some beefy thing, lobster. In every case the little pillows were perfectly al dente: just a slight resistance, then the filling was revealed in all its smooth perfection. In every case the sauce was the perfect balance. I want to know how to do that, starting with those nice symmetrical fat pillows. Help!

Edited by Smithy, 12 September 2005 - 09:52 PM.

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#112 torakris

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 10:47 PM

these pictures are driving me crazy...
I must give this another shot!

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#113 MobyP

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 11:14 PM

What recipe did you use for the pasta?

I also use the Atlas, and level 8. In fact, here is my version of the short rib ravioli using exactly that...
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I was actually thinking that I should move to level 9.

The only thing that I have found with the Atlas is that you should run your finger underneath the rollers every now and then. Small grains of flour tend to build up, and you have to clear them out, or they can tear the pasta as it rolls through.

I wouldn't worry about a few tears. You're learning more each time you make these things, and you'll improve as you go along. When I first started, I would lose 1 in 5 or 6 to rips, or falling apart in the boiling water, or for some other reason. Now it's rare if I lose 1 in 20 or 30. As I said before, it's only experience.
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#114 Adam Balic

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 03:12 AM

A stuffed pasta that is almost English...."Spinach roll" (will look up the Italian name later.

Basically, a thin sheet of potato gnocchi dough (lighted with a pinch of baking soda) is rolled out on a pudding cloth and covered with filling, in this case procuitto, spinach and cheeses.
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This is then rolled up to enclose the filling.
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Boiled for ~ 40 minutes, and allowed to completely cool.
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It is then sliced and browned in the oven with sage butter and parmesan.
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Pretty simple and it can be made will ahead of time. It is also nice when stuffed with left over ragu or other meat stews.

Edited by Adam Balic, 13 September 2005 - 03:13 AM.


#115 MobyP

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 03:42 AM

Adam - that looks fantastic.
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#116 Adam Balic

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 04:22 AM

It would be better if it was a suet crust and filled with liver and bacon :wink: .

#117 Mottmott

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 07:36 AM

A side note:
Ahhh, Klari! That's the tried and true method I use for mushrooms almost all the time -- for whatever.  I never applied a term to it, so thanks!  As a side of sauteed mushrooms with steak for example, I "dry-fry"  :smile: them and add butter at the end before serving.  It's how I cook peeled shrimp for several dishes, as well.  It's amazing how good some things can be just cooked in their own essence and that's all.

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I consider duxelles a pantry (freezer) staple. You can make them in really large batches Once made, they're a quick addition to any recipe calling for a mushroom/shallot mix. The last time I made ravioli I simply added my at-the-ready duxelles to some ricotta for a quick to mix filling. If you freeze them thin and flat in a ziplock bag, it's easy to break of as little as a spoonful of them to add to whatever you want as well as larger quantities.

I also use them, mixed with gruyere, herbs wrapped in phyllo for nibbles.
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#118 Smithy

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 09:56 AM

What recipe did you use for the pasta?

I also use the Atlas, and level 8. In fact, here is my version of the short rib ravioli using exactly that...
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I was actually thinking that I should move to level 9.

The only thing that I have found with the Atlas is that you should run your finger underneath the rollers every now and then. Small grains of flour tend to build up, and you have to clear them out, or they can tear the pasta as it rolls through.

I wouldn't worry about a few tears. You're learning more each time you make these things, and you'll improve as you go along. When I first started, I would lose 1 in 5 or 6 to rips, or falling apart in the boiling water, or for some other reason. Now it's rare if I lose 1 in 20 or 30. As I said before, it's only experience.

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I used 400g unbleached pastry flour, 4 large eggs, 1 T EVOO, pinch of salt, and a spot of semolina for dusting.

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It looks like my dough is still more limp. Yours has to be contracting somewhat to get those upturned edges. Is that a protein content thing? Still, the filled parts of both sets show voids in the filling and places where the dough collapses or puffs up to follow the contours of the filling. Maybe I'm closer than I think. Next time I'll try all-purpose flour instead of pastry flour for the slightly higher protein content, and see what that does.

The tears were all little pinholes that sprang when I was tamping the top layer down over the bottom. There weren't as many as the last time - you're right, I'm learning! - but I still had to double the top layer of quite a few. None of them sprang leaks in the pot, anyway.

I keep thinking about the non-lumpy, full-stuffed pillows of ravioli I had at that restaurant. Russ wondered whether they'd been baked instead of boiled. Is that possible? Or, as I'm starting to think, does having a mold make all the difference in the world for getting a well-stuffed raviolo? Those little pillows had minimal edges, and as I recall were roughly 2" diameter and 1/2" thick. I wish I'd taken a picture.

Meanwhile, there's Adam:

It is then sliced and browned in the oven with sage butter and parmesan.
Posted Image

Pretty simple and it can be made will ahead of time. It is also nice when stuffed with left over ragu or other meat stews.

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That is thunderstrikingly gorgeous :wub: even discounting the special appeal of a dish that can be made well ahead. After the last couple of nights, the advance preparation carries extra weight. :biggrin:

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#119 Adam Balic

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 10:54 AM

Thanks. That name is "Rotolo di Patate e Spinici" and is based on a recipe from Anna del Conte. I should repeat that it has to be made ahead of time so that it can be successfully sliced.

#120 MobyP

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 11:16 AM

I think mine have slightly less air around the filling, so the seal around the edge will do that kind of thing. Also, perhaps, less cooking time. Yours look great, btw.
"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

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