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Pegu Club


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#31 ned

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 06:51 AM

Finally made it to Pegu yesterday afternoon. It more than lived up to the hype. I was prepared to pass off excesses of interior design as an evil necessary to an ambitious project such as this. Not so at all. It's really good in there. Conjures a mood, the light during the day is fabulous, dusty bamboo flooring, all that orientalism, good furniture, a great big bar made from one maple tree with visible memories of being tapped for maple syrup. . . really cool.

As far as drinks, well I finally had a chance to try a Ti Punch. Hilarity of hilarities, it's not the drink for me. I recognize why another would love it. Anyway after months of curiosity that's finally out of the way. I moved into safe territory with a Negroni made with Boodles followed by a Juniperotivo. Both were exemplary but the Juniperotivo: lime juice, simple syrup, pomegranite syrup (actually molasses I think?), mint, Junipero gin. That's a drink I'm going to be messing around with for a while.

Oh and also we were feeling a little snacky so ate the deviled eggs with smoked trout. They are a good effort. I'll want to eat them every time I go to Pegu. Makes me wonder about the venerable tradition of snacks that sit on the bar, not nuts and pretzels but pickled boiled eggs and other pickled things, sandwiches (up until prohibition). I don't know so much about it, just a notion that back in the day there might be a jar of something semi off-putting sitting behind the bar for patrons to munch on. . . I'm rambling. Pegu makes a yummy deviled egg that rivals the one at Blue Smoke.
You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

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#32 slkinsey

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:09 AM

. . . the Juniperotivo: lime juice, simple syrup, pomegranite syrup (actually molasses I think?), mint, Junipero gin.  That's a drink I'm going to be messing around with for a while.

This is a great sweet-sour drink created by Jerri Banks.

Juniperotivo
2.0 oz : Junipero gin
1.0 oz : fresh lime juice
1.0 oz : simple syrup
0.5 oz : pomegranate molasses
2 sprigs of mint

Shake all ingredients vigorously with ice.  Strain into chilled cocktail glass and garnish with mint leaf.

This is one drink where the brand of gin makes a big difference. There really is no substitute for Junipero in this one, although Tanqueray might do in a pinch.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#33 therese

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 02:29 PM

Drinks at Pegu Club after dinner this last Saturday. We arrived 9-ish to a not-too-full room and took the last two seats at the bar. Beautiful space, staff pleasant. Things got louder (but not too loud) and crowded (but not unpleasantly so) as the evening wore on.

I started out with an Earl Grey Mar-TEA-ni and quite liked it. My dinner date got the Pegu Club, and so I got to taste that as well, similarly very nice.

Things get a little blurry somewhere along the line, so I'm not entirely sure what followed: as the Mar-TEA-ni reminded me of the sort of frothy drinks my mother used to drink (but that I never tasted) I asked for a Brandy Alexander (very good) and a Pink Lady (which our bartender had to look up, and with good reason). I finished up with a Negroni, again for sentimental reasons (involving an old boyfriend and some lost time in Milan some years ago).

Altogether very pleasant evening, and perhaps the best thing about it was that when I realized the next day that I'd left my AmEx in the bill folder (hmm, wonder how ever I managed that...) I wasn't too concerned about it having gone truly astray. Sure enough, my phone message about it early in the day was returned that afternoon, and I promptly dropped 'round to retrieve it.
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#34 johnder

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 09:18 AM

Finally made it to Pegu last night. We attempted to go on Monday early, but they were closed for a private party involving fashion week. Showed up early yesterday and started with a nice Aviation while I waited for my wife and friend to show up. Wife ordered a Rob Roy and our friend ordered the Pegu Club All were outstanding. Next round the three of us has the MarTEAni, Whisky Smash and an Eve. The eve was amazing -- who would have thought vermouth infused with Mcintosh apples was so delicious!


I was the only one to opt for a 3rd drink and decided to end the evening with a Corpse Reviver. Ahhh a good way to close the night.

We will definately be going back -- probably next Wednesday!

John
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#35 Megan Blocker

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Posted 17 September 2005 - 08:38 AM

I made it to Pegu Club last night for some cocktails with my friends Nick and Louisa, who are getting married a week from today, and moving to Ohio right after their honeymoon (for a job). They seemed very sad to have to leave New York so soon after finding such fabulous beverages.

I started with a classic Manhattan on the rocks (not on the menu, but it was gooood), then moved on to a Pegu Club cocktail, which I loved. Louisa favored the Old Cuban, which she called a "Champagne mojito!" After the Pegu, I had a Jimmie Roosevelt - all I remember about this one was how unbelievably strong it was. Nick had to down half of it so I could move on to a glass of the Eve (apple-infused vermouth) to finish things off.

The nibbles were also good - we particularly liked the sloppy duck, though the coconut shrimp were also pretty yummy.

Nick really enjoyed the feel of the place (as did we all), particularly the whole British colonial thing. As he put it, he's "really into imperialism." More from an academic perspective than an actionable one, I imagine.

In short, thanks to all for this great recommendation and info - I'll definitely be back!
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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#36 SobaAddict70

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 07:19 AM

Smoked trout deviled eggs?....The egg yolk was blended with both a curry mayonnaise and trout smoked with hickory. The hickory registered more strongly than the trout. The dish worked.


Crab cakes were serviceable. Coconut shrimp quelled hunger without causing undue disappointment.

And isn't that what bar food is all about? And isn't the Pegu Club cool?



The Pegu Club (Frank Bruni)

Related discussion regarding Mr. Bruni's style of reviewing and the New York Times star system can be found here.


Soba

#37 ned

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 07:32 AM

Damn. Wish he hadn't done that.
You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

#38 slkinsey

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 08:46 AM

Bruni, er. . . he doesn't really get it, does he? It's really too bad that Grimes didn't write this piece, because he's someone who really understands and appreciates a cocktail.

It seems odd to me that he felt constrained to write mostly about the food -- even going so far as to state that it was the food that allows Pegu Club to "earn it a place in this column." Would one write about a serious wine bar by spending 75% of the column writing about the bar snacks?

It's also interesting to see how much Bruni's perceptions differ from those of more experienced cocktail enthusiasts in these forums. We have been rejoicing in the Pegu Club's "Fitty - Fitty" Martini as a return to the true form of the drink, while he characterizes it as "awfully wet." And while members like Joerg Meyer have been calling the droppers of lemon, lime, simple and bitters "a really great invention" Bruni finds it a "cute additional gimmick."

Oh well...

Damn.  Wish he hadn't done that.

They may feel the same way. I don't think they'll ever allow Pegu Club to become a "three deep at the bar" kind of place.
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#39 bergerka

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 08:56 AM

Doggone Frank Bruni anyway. Couldn't he have reviewed some bar where he'd "get it?" Where they serve you a glass of gin and call it a martini? :angry:
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Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi
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Provolone flatbread goat's head soup
Gruyere cheese angelhair please
And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.
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#40 Megan Blocker

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 10:59 AM

Damn.  Wish he hadn't done that.

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Exactly!

Now, thanks to Frank Bruni, I can't get into a neigborhood Italian joint (Spigolo), and, perhaps soon, my new favorite bar.

Grrrrrrrr.
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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#41 cdh

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 11:03 AM

Sad... I'd hoped to go before it became packed to the gills. That doesn't look likely now.
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

----- De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est

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#42 Alchemist

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 01:50 PM

Sad... I'd hoped to go before it became packed to the gills. That doesn't look likely now.

As I understand it the doorman is for controlling volume of people and not doing the velvet rope thing. They know that the labor intensity of the drinks is a bad match for three deep at the bar. And the vibe would be ruined be hordes of hooting patrons.



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#43 M.X.Hassett

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 02:05 PM

Oh no :wacko:. Congrats Audrey, I hope you remember us who came before the review :wink:. If I haid acces to a mountain I would shout to the world(E-gullet) go to Pegu. I have it on good authority that they make a great Hemmingway Daq, and that the old cuban is pretty good with barbencourt :wink:. Lets just hope the masses come and then go on to wherever the times TELLS them to go next. PEGU :wub:
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#44 slkinsey

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 02:27 PM

Sad... I'd hoped to go before it became packed to the gills. That doesn't look likely now.

As I understand it the doorman is for controlling volume of people and not doing the velvet rope thing.

This is my understanding as well. As I think I mention upthread, I was there one Thursday night when the place filled almost to capacity -- at which time there was some mention of limiting the door for a while in order avoid overcrowding. Of course, as you say, I am quite sure the velvet rope thing will not be happening there, as this is antithetical to the philosophies of the people involved.
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#45 cdh

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 04:09 PM

Sad... I'd hoped to go before it became packed to the gills. That doesn't look likely now.

As I understand it the doorman is for controlling volume of people and not doing the velvet rope thing.

This is my understanding as well. As I think I mention upthread, I was there one Thursday night when the place filled almost to capacity -- at which time there was some mention of limiting the door for a while in order avoid overcrowding. Of course, as you say, I am quite sure the velvet rope thing will not be happening there, as this is antithetical to the philosophies of the people involved.

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How does one implement door controls without the nefarious velvet rope? Milk & Honey has addressed the problem... but a hidden phone number club wouldn't be doable for a recently reviewed hotspot. Angel's Share has too... strict rules and all... Maybe a reservations policy with a published phone number would work... We'll see if I can get in next time I find myself in NYC.

Edited by cdh, 23 September 2005 - 04:12 PM.

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

----- De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

#46 slkinsey

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 07:05 PM

How does one implement door controls without the nefarious velvet rope?

The "velvet rope" involves selecting people based on how "cool" they are to create a certain "scene" in the bar/lounge/club/restaurant/whatever.

Places that "limit the door" may turn people away, but the door is limited for the purpose of making sure the place doesn't go over capacity rather than to create a "scene," and people are admitted on a first come/first served basis rather than what kind of clothes they are wearing, etc.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#47 daisy17

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 09:26 PM

We had such a lovely time at Pegu tonight. I should probably not be allowed access to a computer after all the drinking we did, but here I am nonetheless. After believing firmly that I was a vodka drinker, the dedicated bartenders at Pegu taught me that I like gin and even rye - RYE! Who would have thought it? The bartenders are remarkably passionate about their craft, and their passion is contagious and thrilling. Started off the night with a Gin-Gin Mule (so refreshing and delightful), onto a Whiskey Smash, and then Toby made me a concoction whose name I am completely forgetting with rye and pomegranate juice, and it rocked my world. Feel like I've never had a cocktail before - I had no idea how complex a drink could be in the mouth. Simply fantastic. Can't wait to go back.

#48 scovilleFiend

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 06:01 AM

Sad... I'd hoped to go before it became packed to the gills. That doesn't look likely now.

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Yeah, I stopped by on saturday night. Or rather, tried to but did not feel like waiting for a half an hour. Maybe it will settle down in a month or two, or maybe I should just quit my job and show up at 3pm, which is actually quite tempting :)

#49 slkinsey

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 07:31 AM

I was there on Saturday myself (and, er. . . a good bit of Sunday morning too). It was filled to capacity at around ten or eleven o'clock, at which time was a wait at the door. This was precisely to make sure that it was never "packed to the gills" inside. Inside had the feel and bustle of a filled room, but never felt crowded. Without crowd management at the door, it would have been a madhouse inside. By the time 1:00 or 2:00 rolled around, I don't think there was a wait.

As a general rule of thumb, Saturday night at 10 or 11 is the worst possible time to be out looking for a peak cocktail experience, because even the best places are going to be packed with weekend barhoppers. By limiting the door to control capacity, Pegu Club is actually doing something unusual for an "open admission" bar: they are making it possible to get a peak cocktail experience in a comfortable setting with the full attention of the barstaff even at 11 on Saturday night if you're willing to wait for a while. This, of course, is something restaurants have always done -- we're just used to the idea that bars will cram in as many people as are willing to come through the door.

As another general rule of thumb, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday nights are the best possible times to be out looking for a peak cocktail experience. I'm sure there is no wait at the door to get into Pegu Club tonight, and last night you might have shared the bartender at Flatiron Lounge with only a few other people. Five or six o'clock is also a good time just about any day except Friday.


On another subject: Check out the web site at peguclub.com. If you click on the "Ethos" tab, there is a nice video of a bartender making a Pineapple Pisco Sour and swizzling a Ti Punch (with a real swizzle stick, natch).
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#50 scovilleFiend

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 07:49 AM

I realized that it was not going to be the best of times to go, but was hoping for a miracle I suppose. The "line" was fairly minimal outside actually, but I suspected that there would be overcrowding. I am not a fan of crowded bars, and at least on saturday night the other people waiting did not look like the sort of people I cared to be drinking around. Popped collars scare me. Had I known it would still be comfy inside, I might have stuck around, but instead opted for other watering holes in the village that had seats.

It is nice to know that the atmosphere is pleasant even at "max" capacity, and I commend the club for sticking to this.

#51 Megan Blocker

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 04:04 PM

Here's hoping that my habit of starting early pays off! :wacko:

Some more Pegu news...I'm just getting to reading my October issue of Gourmet, and who should be mentioned in an article about the perfect ice cube than Audrey Saunders!

Cheers for subtle PR! :wink:
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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#52 lambretta76

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 06:02 AM

Went last night (Monday) at about 8 pm - the bar was full but the seats we're about 1/3 occupied. Sat in very plush lounge chairs and had a Pegu Club cocktail (outstanding) and my fiancee had a Whiskey Smash (she's a Dale DeGroff fan). Both were very good - the Pegu Club had an interesting taste of fresh lavendar. By 9 pm the bar was empty. The service was nice, but I doubt she knew much about cocktails. Next time I go I'll go a little later so I can sit at the bar and order directly from the 'tenders - there's lots of bottles of things infusing behind the bar - I'd like to see what's going on there. Prices are $11-$16 for cocktails and are well worth it. Food ranges from $7-$18 and looks decent.

One great thing is that they sell Peychaud's bitters at $6 a bottle - these are quite elusive outside of The Big Easy. Sazeracs here I come!

#53 rhubarbd

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 06:26 PM

Audrey, i gotta ask: who does your PR? Impressive.

#54 baw

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 07:16 PM

rhubarbd - I'm obviously not Audrey, but I'm not sure what you mean :)

Do you mean the thread of unending praise for Pegu is impressive? If so, its not PR. Its actually that great of a place! If not, I maybe didn't get your drift..

cheers
beth

#55 Nathan

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 07:27 AM

rhubarbd:

if you're into cocktails...you know who Audrey Saunders is and why the Pegu Club is a big deal.

#56 Megan Blocker

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 07:54 AM

rhubarbd:

if you're into cocktails...you know who Audrey Saunders is and why the Pegu Club is a big deal.

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True, true...but good PR does help you get small but effective placements in major magazines. It's actually amazing how much of what we consider news and journalism is really PR in disguise...

In this case, though, it makes me happy! :biggrin: Plus, i learned all about ice and which kind to use for which drink. Very exciting stuff.
"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

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#57 rhubarbd

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 06:35 PM

rhubarbd:
if you're into cocktails...you know who Audrey Saunders is and why the Pegu Club is a big deal.

True, true...but good PR does help you get small but effective placements in major magazines. It's actually amazing how much of what we consider news and journalism is really PR in disguise...

In this case, though, it makes me happy! :biggrin: Plus, i learned all about ice and which kind to use for which drink. Very exciting stuff.

Nathan, not only do i know cocktails, but I've followed Audrey, her mentors, and the places she's been affiliated with for years. I did not mean to imply that PR alone was responsible for her success; i was simply asking a question - perhaps too quickly.

Audrey is smart, talented, detail-oriented, and business-savvy. She sensed a niche in the marketplace that was right for her and her partners ... and she jumped in with panache and professionalism. She's worked hard to get where she is, and the praise for her abilities is justified.

It is equally true - just as Megan posted - that strategic PR helps you get where you want to get ... especially if you have a worthwhile story to tell. And the best restaurateurs/mixologists etc. create a team (from FOH staff to marketing consultants) that understand and appreciate their concept - and do everything it takes to execute it well.

And baw - it's not the unending praise for Pegu that's made an impression on me (though kudos to them for carrying it off so well). It's the high-level nature of the placements - in tandem with the praise - that makes all the difference.

Hope i've made myself clearer!

#58 Nathan

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 07:49 AM

understood...no problem. :wink:

#59 ned

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 09:10 AM

I’ve really been enjoying the Pegu Club. Going there often, learning some new drinks, etc. So I’m reluctant to say anything at all critical especially because it is such a labor of love. That said. . .

Last night while sat in front of another delicious Juniperitivo, a stainless steel shaker was launched in the air, did a sextuple flip, bounced off a door frame and clattered to the floor. As a former member of a juggling troupe I can hardly be critical of the occasional dropped ball, however there is something anathama about the vibe at Pegu and the “Cocktail”-esque flingings and spinnings of containers behind the bar. After one experience of this I was befuddled, although also curious as to how the adroit fellow would do with devil sticks or a diablo, but I ultimately assumed he’d be trained out of his highjinks. Now though, three visits hence and I’m starting to wonder how he’d do with fire clubs or running chainsaws or as part of a duo with Smerdyakov of the famous juggling Brothers Karamazov. It seems that the flim-flummery is becoming institutionalized.

Maybe I’m alone in experiencing his theatrics as dissonant with gestalt of the bar. In any case, the guy is a killer drinks mixer
You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

#60 Alchemist

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 10:37 AM

Having spent quite a bit of time at Pegu I have never seen Septuple flips behind the bar. Occationaly things are dropped Behind every bar in the world. When dealing with wet, icy metal, and glass impliments (which circus folk don't have to contend with), in the chaotic, fast paced world of a cocktail lounge, sometimes things will succumb to the laws of gravity. And with the rubber mats on the floor nothing "clatters" when it hits the floor.

I can assure you that this will not happen again, since most Pegu employees read this sight. The bartender is probably mortified that this small slip has been brought to the attention of his bosses. I'm sure he will be properly taken to task before his next shift. Thank you for helping to keep the gestalt intact. I'm sure that everyones experiance will be better now.

I agree that "cocktailesque", flair bartending is an abomination. If you watch the movie you will see that it takes two guys three minutes to pour one drink. I have never seen that happen at Pegu. As I understand it any spins or flips are for the pourpose of getting any acess moisture out of the tins, so the cocktails will be as pristine as possible.

I once saw a flamed twist fizzel and not ignite. To avoid future embarrassment, I say, no more showmanship. Let the bartenders of NYC, stop any flim-flam. Make the drinks, and present them to the customer. No more, no less. Wipe those tins out with a bar towel. Muddle, with intent and pourpose. Show no joy in your craft. If a bartender wants to be on stage let them do Shakespear. If a customer wants to be entertained, let them drink at TGI Fridays. At a serious bar Everything should be serious.

Edited by Alchemist, 30 September 2005 - 03:01 PM.




A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE