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Reheating roast beef.


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19 replies to this topic

#1 pedro

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 08:49 AM

After exploring the secrets of roast beef following the low temperature-long time method described in Science in the kitchen, we've achieved pretty good results. Problem is, I haven't found an equivalent way of reheating it, that is, a lot is lost when you reheat the beef.

Has anyone came up with a proper way of reheating a roast beef without significant lose of taste and flavor?
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#2 Sue Flay

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 12:38 PM

I've got half of a lamb roast (boneless leg, coated with mint-almond pesto) in the fridge and have the same question. I was planning to wrap it in foil and put in in a 350 oven for twenty minutes or so, but I'm interested to see if there are better ideas out there.

#3 DTBarton

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 12:54 PM

I know it's blasphemy, but I think the microwave works better than anything. Put slices of beef on a glass plate and smear whatever moisture you've got on it (meat juice, gravy). Cover with plastic wrap and heat on about power level 6 or 7.

I usually avoid the problem altogether and serve my leftover roast beef cold between two slices of rye with mayo, salt, pepper, lettuce, and plenty of horseradish.

#4 The Hersch

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 01:54 PM

I usually avoid the problem altogether and serve my leftover roast beef cold between two slices of rye with mayo, salt, pepper, lettuce, and plenty of horseradish.

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An excellent use for roast beef. In my experience there really is no way to reheat dry-roasted meat (not just beef) and achieve an acceptable result. Both flavor and texture suffer considerably. I have no idea why that is, but it seems to be true. Luckily, roast beef, roast chicken, roast lamb are all excellent cold, or brought to room temperature.

#5 WhiteTruffleGirl

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 02:04 PM

The reason meat never tastes as good when you reheat it is the unsaturated fatty acids which are damaged when exposed to oxygen. It starts the minute you put it in the fridge, and then speeds up when you reheat, which is why I never reheat a roast, but instead use it in salads or sandwiches.

#6 WHT

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 02:16 PM

I use a steamer set with beef broth to heat mine. If you spread it out right it heats in a few moments and does not overcook the beef.
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#7 The Hersch

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 02:49 PM

The reason meat never tastes as good when you reheat it is the unsaturated fatty acids which are damaged when exposed to oxygen.  It starts the minute you put it in the fridge, and then speeds up when you reheat, which is why I never reheat a roast, but instead use it in salads or sandwiches.

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That sounds good, but what about pot-roast, or stews, or things like that? They not only are okay when reheated, they're usually even better.

#8 WhiteTruffleGirl

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 03:11 PM

[quote name='The Hersch' date='Jul 15 2005, 05:49 PM']

[/quote]
That sounds good, but what about pot-roast, or stews, or things like that? They not only are okay when reheated, they're usually even better.

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[/quote]
I was only referring to dry roasted meats, not braises, stews and the such which absolutely benefit from aging. The difference is the liquid and stong seasoning of these need time to marry. A dry roasted piece of beef has nothing to protect it.

#9 jamiemaw

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 03:22 PM

Like many thoughts upthread, I agree that--just like revenge--leftover roast beef is best eaten cold. But my brothers would toast bread, place a few slices of last night's room- temp beef atop and complete the deal with a shellac of reheated gravy. For breakfast.
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#10 jackal10

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 04:07 PM

It never tastes quite as good next day.
The important thing is not to overheat it. Putting it back in a very low oven works but takes a long time, like several hours, or back in a sous vide cooker.

If I want a few slices for a sandwich I also microwave them on a glass plate. I nuke em for 30 seconds on high - just enought to take the chill off. I think they eat much better warm rather than cold.

Editie to add. If I have rare roast beef left over in any quantity, I use it as the basis for a different dish, such as a beef stew (daube), or minced and used in cottage pie or bolognaise, or curry or any number of other possibilities.

Edited by jackal10, 15 July 2005 - 04:31 PM.


#11 Mabelline

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 04:08 PM

I like WHT's answer, as well as room temp, with everything else heated ala Jamie Maw's.
It always seems if it's too warm in room temp to keep it in a pantry, and ends up refrigerated, then cold sliced tastes best.

#12 Sue Flay

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 04:35 PM

Okay--we've revised the plan for the lamb. It's pretty rare, so we're going to slice it thin, sear the slices in a really hot pan, and serve them in pitas with tzatziki like shwarma. I just can't get into cold meat.

#13 Shalmanese

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 05:41 PM

After exploring the secrets of roast beef following the low temperature-long time method described in Science in the kitchen, we've achieved pretty good results. Problem is, I haven't found an equivalent way of reheating it, that is, a lot is lost when you reheat the beef.

Has anyone came up with a proper way of reheating a roast beef without significant lose of taste and flavor?

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If your doing LTLT cooking of roast beef, then just leave the rest in the oven overnight. The longer cooking process will finish converting the collagen to gelatin and will absolutely not degrade the flavour. You wake up the next morning with perfect roast beef for breakfast.
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#14 rooftop1000

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 05:54 PM

Okay--we've revised the plan for the lamb. It's pretty rare, so we're going to slice it thin, sear the slices in a really hot pan, and serve them in pitas with tzatziki like shwarma. I just can't get into cold meat.

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Thats what I was going to suggest ...I make extra just to have the "souvlaki" a day or 2 later

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#15 TongoRad

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 06:03 PM

Okay--we've revised the plan for the lamb. It's pretty rare, so we're going to slice it thin, sear the slices in a really hot pan, and serve them in pitas with tzatziki like shwarma. I just can't get into cold meat.

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I think you'll enjoy that. I've done the very same thing before (well...we use a yogurt and dill sauce, but pretty darn close) and think it's an excellent use of leftover leg of lamb.

I guess the key, whether with lamb or beef, is to not expect to get the same experience the second time around. Enjoy your roast as is on the first night, and do something more 'creative' with it on the second.

Another take-off on something mentioned upthread is that if you have leftover gravy as well you can heat that up in a saucepan. Turn off the heat before adding your sliced cold meat- I find that it comes up to temperature more gently that way. It makes a nice sandwich on a roll.
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#16 carswell

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 06:44 PM

A couple of Provençal dishes are perennial favourites around here. While they're traditionally made with beef, they also work with lamb.

Tian de boeuf: Combine lots of sliced mushrooms with fresh bread crumbs and chopped garlic, shallots and parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Spread half the mixture over the bottom of a baking dish. Place slices of beef over that. Top with the rest of the mushroom mixture. Moisten with white wine. Sprinkle with some more bread crumbs. Drizzle with olive oil. Bake in a moderate oven for 30 minutes.

Boeuf miroton is similar but the mushroom mixture is replaced by a thick sauce of sautéed onion and garlic and tomatoes seasoned with a dash of vinegar, bay, nutmeg and salt and pepper. Layer sauce, then beef, then capers, then sauce, then bread crumbs. Drizzle with olive oil and bake.

#17 BarbaraY

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Posted 16 July 2005 - 06:56 AM

Boeuf miroton is similar but the mushroom mixture is replaced by a thick sauce of sautéed onion and garlic and tomatoes seasoned with a dash of vinegar, bay, nutmeg and salt and pepper. Layer sauce, then beef, then capers, then sauce, then bread crumbs. Drizzle with olive oil and bake.

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This is my favorite way to use leftover roast beef.

#18 pedro

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Posted 16 July 2005 - 10:33 AM

Well, it looks like there's a pretty good agreement about roast beef losing flavor and taste once it gets cold and you try to reheat it. Which makes me wonder how places like the Dorchester in London manage to have its roast beef always ready. Unless, of course, they discard the leftovers and use them for other purposes.
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#19 ruthcooks

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Posted 16 July 2005 - 12:23 PM

Here is an old catering trick used especially for thick slices of prime rib which have been pre-cooked: line a baking sheet with leaves of iceberg lettuce, top with beef in a single layer and cover with more lettuce. Reheat in medium oven. The moisture from the lettuce will keep the beef from losing its red or pink color.
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#20 PCL

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 09:24 PM

Just to add to the mix.

Generally I do the following with leftover roast meat, provided there's enough gravy left, if not, I'll knock up some sauce and do this:

- chop garlic and shallots, and soften in butter
- deglaze with wine (whichever you prefer)
- add remant of gravy, reduce
- when at spoon-coating-consistency, add sliced cold meat and heat through at low-med flame
- serve hot with crusty bread, garnished with chopped parsley and don't forget to wipe the dish...

I find that jacking the gravy with extra garlic/shallots/whatever herby thing you got lying around and wine etc and then re-heating the meat slowly in the resulting tasty goop makes for a good impromptu semi-braise/daube/saucy mess of meat that makes for good eating.


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