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Sticky Rice

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#31 hzrt8w

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 08:01 PM

The best crab for this are those that has alot of "go", those orange stuff, i don't know what it's called in english. It will melt into the rice. it's SO yummy!!

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"Go":

Male crabs --> sperm - white/yellowish color
Female crabs --> roe (eggs) - orange color
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#32 Ben Hong

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 08:45 PM

Can also be called "tomalley" as in the lobster. The Japanese refer to it as "liver" in English as heard on the "Iron Chef".

#33 dornachu

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 11:19 PM

Male crabs --> sperm - white/yellowish color
Female crabs --> roe (eggs) - orange color

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[/quote]

:shock:

I didnt know about the sperm part... but I usually had the orange ones, for some reason, doesn't sound as scary.

#34 mudbug

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 12:01 AM

Two of my absolute favorites with sticky rice:

Dim Sum Sticky Rice "Nor My Gai" Recipes:
http://www.google.co...=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Sticky Rice with Mango
http://www.google.co...cup&btnG=Search

Edited by mudbug, 14 July 2005 - 12:02 AM.


#35 Dejah

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 05:14 AM

Two of my absolute favorites with sticky rice:

Dim Sum Sticky Rice "Nor My Gai" Recipes:
http://www.google.co...=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Sticky Rice with Mango
http://www.google.co...cup&btnG=Search

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In nor my gai AND joong, I was taught to cut the poultry up WITH the bones, a la Chinese style. There is a lot of flavour in the bones. Remember, BBQ duck is cooked with a marinate inside the bird.

I like chomping on bones, but my hubby and kids prefer that I use just the meat. 39 years and I still don't have him trained. :wink: :laugh:
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#36 mudbug

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:06 PM

I like chomping on bones, but my hubby and kids prefer that I use just the meat. 39 years and I still don't have him trained. :wink:  :laugh:


Aw... the meat around the bones has the best flavor, is tender and so fun to eat, they're missing out on the best part!

#37 hzrt8w

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:20 PM

I like chomping on bones, but my hubby and kids prefer that I use just the meat. 39 years and I still don't have him trained. :wink:  :laugh:

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Hmmm.... starting tomorrow, only chicken feet and chicken wings. :raz:
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#38 rjwong

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 10:00 PM

I learned the recipe for Chinese sticky rice (Naw Mai Fon) over many years of watching my aunt making it for the holidays. There are many variations to this festive dish.

NB This is in no way to compete with Ah Leung's most excellent Chinese cooking series.

A few special ingredients:

Posted Image
dried mushrooms and dried shrimp

They first need to be soaked before use. I used about nine dried mushrooms and about half a bag (quarter of a pound) of dried shrimp. You can add a little more or a little less.

Posted Image
Chinese sausage (lop cheung) and Chinese bacon (lop yook)

I used the entire package of each for this recipe.

Posted Image
lop cheung, lop yook, dried mushrooms, dried shrimp, celery, and green onions

Each container holds about 2 cups. Dicing all these ingredients took the longest time.

The lop cheung and the lop yook can be quite difficult. You might want to put them in the freezer for a little bit for easier handling.

I found it easier for me to slice and dice the mushrooms one at a time. Again, easier handling.

Posted Image
rice

My National rice cooker makes about 8 cups of cooked rice. I used a combination of both long grain rice and short grain rice. I used a ratio of 3 parts long grain to 2 parts short grain. It's the short grain rice that makes things sticky. A 1:1 ratio (long grain to short grain) produces a stickier rice than a 2:1 ratio.

As for how much water to put in, here's a basic ratio:
1 ½ parts water to 1 part long grain
1 part water to 1 part short grain

Posted Image
cooking the meat mixture in small batches

I cooked the different ingredients in a pot (See, no wok!). While cooking each batch, I add some soy sauce and a few drops of sesame oil.

Posted Image
cooked rice and meat mixture before final mixing

If my rice cooker was larger, I would add the mixture right into the rice pot.

Posted Image
Chinese sticky rice (Naw Mai Fon)
Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

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#39 SuzySushi

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 10:10 PM

This looks delicious!

Would you use the same mixture to steam in lotus leaves, or is that made from glutinous rice?
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#40 hzrt8w

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 12:59 AM

rjwong: That's absolutely stunning! Looks very delish!!! It looks like you use more liu (other ingredients) than rice! :raz: :wub:

When I made this, I always use only sticky rice. Maybe a mix of sticky rice and regular jasmine rice is the key to make it "less" sticky! Never thought of that.

I had just bought some decent lap cheung (Chinese sausage) and lap yuk (Chinese preserved pork) from SF Chinatown. You have inspired me that I gotta make this dish soon. I am very chicken to fats. The lap yuk I bought is all lean. I hope it tastes okay. :smile:
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#41 hzrt8w

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 01:09 AM

Would you use the same mixture to steam in lotus leaves, or is that made from glutinous rice?

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I know it is kind of confusing. There are 2 different dim sum dishes in Cantonese cooking that involves lotus leaves and rice.

First is Nor Mai Gai (chicken in sticky rice with lotus leaves). You would typically see this offered in US Chinese dim sum restaurants. The typical ingredients are: a piece of chicken, black mushroom, a slice of lap cheung, dried shrimp, salted egg yolk. They are wrapped with sticky rice inside a lotus leaf and steamed.

Second is Ho Yip Fan (lotus leaf rice). This one, they wrap the regular rice in a lotus leaf with chopped lap cheung, dried shrimp, chopped black mushrooms, chooped green onions, then steamed. I don't think I have seen this dish offered in US based Chinese dim sum places.
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#42 SuzySushi

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 01:48 AM

There are 2 different dim sum dishes in Cantonese cooking that involves lotus leaves and rice.

First is Nor Mai Gai (chicken in sticky rice with lotus leaves).  You would typically see this offered in US Chinese dim sum restaurants.  The typical ingredients are: a piece of chicken, black mushroom, a slice of lap cheung, dried shrimp, salted egg yolk.  They are wrapped with sticky rice inside a lotus leaf and steamed.

Second is Ho Yip Fan (lotus leaf rice).  This one, they wrap the regular rice in a lotus leaf with chopped lap cheung, dried shrimp, chopped black mushrooms, chooped green onions, then steamed.  I don't think I have seen this dish offered in US based Chinese dim sum places.

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I'm pretty sure what I eat here is the first version. Some restaurants add bits of pork as well. It's one of my favorite dim sum dishes. My 9-year-old's, too! Last time we had it, we got an extra dish (2 packets) free because an overly zealous busboy cleared away her plate before she was finished picking the last tidbits off her lotus leaf! She was so visibly dismayed that the manager sent over another order. (We're regulars at that restaurant, so the staff recognizes us.)
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#43 hzrt8w

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 02:12 AM

[...] My 9-year-old's, too! Last time we had it, we got an extra dish (2 packets) free because an overly zealous busboy cleared away her plate before she was finished picking the last tidbits off her lotus leaf! She was so visibly dismayed that the manager sent over another order.

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This is so hilerious! :biggrin:

It's hard being a waiter in Chinese restaurants. They have to carefully examine the plate, over some torn lotus leaves, to determine whether it's okay to remove the plate. And the last thing that they would do is to ask the customer. :laugh:
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#44 I_call_the_duck

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 08:46 AM

rjwong, that looks delicious. I wasn't sure if you could cook it in a rice cooker, since when my mom makes it, she uses the big old rice pot.

When I made this, I always use only sticky rice.  Maybe a mix of sticky rice and regular jasmine rice is the key to make it "less" sticky!  Never thought of that.

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Mom finally wrote down her recipe. It's pretty straightforward, but I wanted to get it right. She also uses a regular/sticky rice combo. She says she does it more because she had to stretch the sticky rice out to feed six on a tight budget.


[...] My 9-year-old's, too! Last time we had it, we got an extra dish (2 packets) free because an overly zealous busboy cleared away her plate before she was finished picking the last tidbits off her lotus leaf! She was so visibly dismayed that the manager sent over another order.

View Post

This is so hilerious! :biggrin:

It's hard being a waiter in Chinese restaurants. They have to carefully examine the plate, over some torn lotus leaves, to determine whether it's okay to remove the plate. And the last thing that they would do is to ask the customer. :laugh:

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I've had overzealous waiters take away my plates at many different types of restaurants. My friend told me a story that his mother stabbed the waiter with her fork because he was trying to take away her salad before she was done eating it! :shock:

My method now is less violent. If I see a waiter approaching, I discretley (?) hold onto my plate so they're not able to take it. It may be rude, but then they won't have a chance to take those last tidbits away.
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#45 Dejah

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 09:00 AM

rjwong: That's absolutely stunning! Looks very delish!!!  It looks like you use more liu (other ingredients) than rice!  :raz:  :wub:

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Lovely looking liu rjwong. :biggrin: I'm glad to see someone else think in the same mode as I. There's no point in taking the time for all the prep. with more rice than liu!

With what rjwong has in his pictorial, you can eat it as is, served in bowls with a light soup on the side, or wrapped in lotus leaf. If you make lots of lotus leaf nor mai gai/fan, you can freeze them and just steam from the frozen state for 20 minutes.

My s-i-l steams the whole mixture rather than cooking the rice and ingredients separately.
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#46 Chris Amirault

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 05:01 PM

Thanks for the nudge to this topic, Russell! I made Naw Mai Fon following your recipe -- plus, using Eileen Yin-Fei Lo's as a guide, added some oyster sauce and a bit of chicken stock. Great use of the lop yuk, in particular, which I steamed after dicing. The lop yuk really structures the whole dish. I'd show you photos if there were any left! :smile: Fantastic -- thanks!
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#47 rjwong

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 04:14 PM

Chris, why did you steam the lop yook by itself? Steam out the fat (and the flavor) and replace it with oyster sauce? I would think that you would want to keep the flavor of the lop yook in the naw mai fon, especially homemade lop yook. :huh:
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#48 Chris Amirault

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 07:25 PM

I steamed it just briefly, maybe two or three minutes, to make it a bit more tender; when I had fried it directly it cooked up a bit tough. Someone somewhere recommended it, but I can't find it at the moment. It didn't release very much of the fat into the water at all; I didn't want to do that, for precisely the reasons you cite.

Also, the oyster sauce was part of Yin-Fei Lo's recipe, not a replacement for the fat/flavor of the pork.
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#49 Ben Hong

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 10:04 PM

A lot of people are using oyster sauce pretty indiscriminately now as a "boost' in flavouring up a dish. The propensity to do so has a lot to do with the recommendations in a lot of the new cookbooks. One would think that with all the "liu" that RJ has put into his rice, oyster sauce would be more of a "mask' instead of enhancement. With the amount of liu depicted, a bit of soy sauce is all that I would need. I want to taste the constituents and not have them overwhelmed by oyster sauce. It is a "rice" dish after all.

Besides the usual lop cheong, lop yook, and mushrooms, my favourite green crunchies are diced yard long beans, or diced jicama, or diced kohlrabi. I also like to top off my bowl of this rice with a few bits of green onions. The best version of this dish is made with dried duck (lop app), as the duck fat is sinfully and unctuously delicious.

The dish would be just as tasty, maybe tastier, when cooked together with the liu on top of the rice . It certainly would be softer to the palate.

We call this rice dish "yau fan", and I normally associate it with the fall around the harvest in China.

Edited by Ben Hong, 25 November 2005 - 10:12 PM.


#50 hzrt8w

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 11:03 PM

I too do not use oyster sauce to cook sticky rice. I do not feel it is appropriate for this dish. In Hong Kong, sticky rice is first steamed, then stir-fried with the ingredients (diced lap cheung, dried shrimp, diced black mushrooms, some peanuts and green onions). They season the rice with dark soy sauce. That's the version I have been making. :smile:

Nor Mai Fan (stir-fried sticky rice) is quite different from Nor Mai Gai (steamed sticky rice wrapped in lotus leaves). The former is consumed with the sticky rice retaining a good grainy texture. The latter is consumed with the sticky rice steamed to soften and glued together - almost like a cake.
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#51 Chris Amirault

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 08:12 AM

A lot of people are using oyster sauce pretty indiscriminately now as a "boost' in flavouring up a dish. The propensity to do so has a lot to do with the recommendations in a lot of the new cookbooks. One would think that with all the "liu" that RJ has put into his rice, oyster sauce would be more of a "mask' instead of enhancement. With the amount of liu depicted, a bit of soy sauce is all that I would need. I want to taste the constituents and not have them overwhelmed by oyster sauce. It is a "rice" dish after all.

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This seems very smart to me, Ben (and Ah Leung, who made the same point). The recipes in the newest Yin-Fei Lo cookbook (The Chinese Kitchen) seem to me to be overseasoned, and in the version I prepared, the taste of the individual ingredients in the "liu" (if I understand correctly) were muddled a bit by the oyster sauce. In particular, I thought that the interplay between the lowly celery, of all things, and the other ingredients was muted, which really detracted from the entire dish.

I feel as if I'm being reminded here of something important in the constitution of these dishes. Next time, I'll try it as Russell suggests -- and I like the addition of the beans for a different texture, Ben.
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#52 rjwong

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 12:23 PM

Chris, I'm glad you'll take my suggestions, despite my youth and inexperience. :raz:

I'm making another batch of naw mai fon for my Thanksgiving dinner today.
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#53 BettyK

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 09:27 PM

Russell, your Naw Mai Fon looks really scrumptious. I could eat this everyday :wub: ...
and dope on antihistamines. :laugh: :wink: (seafood allergy - but that doesn't stop me).
OK, I will be good and I will reduce the dried shrimp when I make it.

#54 Less-is-More

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 01:30 PM

Two of my absolute favorites with sticky rice:
Dim Sum Sticky Rice "Nor My Gai" Recipes:
http://www.google.co...=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

I've made Nor My Gai twice in the past week, and just don't think my rice is cooked as gluey (glutinousy) as the Nor My Gai I used to get in SF.

I used sweet rice, and followed some directions for cooking I found online. One time, I tried steaming it on cheesecloth in a bamboo steamer for 20 mins, letting it sit for 5 mins. The second time, I steamed it for an hour. Both seemed less "plumped up and gluey" than when I had it in dim sum places in SK and HK.


Is this because the Nor My Gai in restaurants has been steamed and resteamed? And sits around in the bottom of a cart?

I like the glueier texture, and would love to replicate it.

My bag of rice does not have instructions, although I did see a recipe online where the rice was boiled instead of steamed...

Thanks for any suggestions.

#55 Dejah

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 10:00 PM

I cook nor mai the same way I cook regular long grain rice, either on top of the stove or in an electric rice cooker. The texture depends on the amount of water you use in the cooking - the more water, the "gluier" the rice. :smile:
For the texture that I prefer - sticky but still maintaining the individual grains, I soak the rice for about an hour, then cook with about 1/4 inch of water above the surface of the rice. Once the pot boils, I turn the heat to the lowest setting and let it finish cooking in about 15 minutes or so.
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#56 rjwong

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 10:28 PM

Less-is-More, are you talking about cooking plain sticky rice (short-grain rice, not long-grain rice)? Or are you talking about making Chinese Sticky Rice (Naw Mai Fon) , with all the Chinese sausage, Chinese bacon, dried shrimp, dried mushroom, etc.?

If you have access to the cookbook, The Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook by Gloria Bley Miller, there is a section on cooking rice, either boiled or steamed. Generally, long-grain rice is more absorbent & needs more water; short-grain rice uses less than long-grain:

Long-grain rice: 1 part long-grain to 1 1/2 part water (for boiling)
Short-grain rice: 1 part short-grain to 1 part water (for boiling)

What gets more interesting is when you combine the two types of rice and start experimenting.
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#57 Less-is-More

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 10:14 AM

Or are you talking about making Chinese Sticky Rice (Naw Mai Fon), with all the Chinese sausage, Chinese bacon, dried shrimp, dried mushroom, etc.?
If you have access to the cookbook, The Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook by Gloria Bley Miller, there is a section on cooking rice...
What gets more interesting is when you combine the two types of rice and start experimenting.

For the texture that I prefer - sticky but still maintaining the individual grains, I soak the rice for about an hour, then cook with about 1/4 inch of water above the surface of the rice. Once the pot boils, I turn the heat to the lowest setting and let it finish cooking in about 15 minutes or so.

Thanks to both of you for responding. I'm going to have a Dim Sum Party in February, so I'd love to get this nailed down...

rjwong: I'm talking about the steamed rice in lotus leaves (Nor My Gai), with the mushrooms, sausage, ham, etc... The recipe called for glutinous rice, so I bought "sweet rice" from Thailand. (I couldn't find a chinese brand) I'm assuming this is the right rice, but maybe not... Looks short grain to me... No, I don't have that book. Too bad, but thanks for the basics. I have seen recipes for Nor My Gai with a mixture of rice. Maybe I'll try that once I get the glutinous rice the way I like it.

Dejah: I'll give boiling a go. Thanks!

#58 Dejah

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 01:38 PM

Less-is-more:

When I make nor mai fan in lotus leaves, I cook the rice separate from the rest of the ingredients.

While the rice is cooking, I would stir-fry the diced lap cheong, mushrooms, lap yook, shrimp, onion and sometimes peanuts with oil and seasoning. Then when the rice is cooked, I mix it all up together in a big bowl, make the packets with the presoaked lotus leaves, then steam for 20 minutes.

Leftover packets can be frozen for later enjoyment. :smile:

There are 2 "sizes" of sweet rice; one is short and plump - dai nor(like moi! :laugh: ), and the other skinny with pointed ends - sai nor mai. I have used the kind from Thailand and it's fine. If it says "sweet rice" then it's glutinous.

The only time I mix regular long grain and glutinous short grain is for zoongzi.
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#59 Less-is-More

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 01:45 PM

Less-is-more:
Leftover packets can be frozen for later enjoyment. :smile:

Glad to hear they freeze well. I was planning to try that for my party. Do you freeze them after assembling them OR after steaming the assembled packet? Do you need to thaw them before steaming or just steam them longer? Thanks!

#60 Dejah

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 02:57 PM

Less-is-more:
Leftover packets can be frozen for later enjoyment. :smile:

Glad to hear they freeze well. I was planning to try that for my party. Do you freeze them after assembling them OR after steaming the assembled packet? Do you need to thaw them before steaming or just steam them longer? Thanks!

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You can freeze them after assembling, then just steam for the same amount of time as freshly assembled ones - 20 minutes before serving. No need to thaw them before steaming.
Dejah
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