Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

The Mediterranean Feast


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 30 April 2005 - 02:04 PM

I have not read every page of this wondrous book. Each page swells with knowledge and scholarship.

If I may be so bold as to clumsily share my thoughts I would like to begin near the end of the book. In a chapter titled Conclusion the Unity of the Mediterranean.

There were two Mediterraneans- East and West, Turkish and Spanish, Islamic and Christian.


As I hope is somewhat evident by now, we can say that there are many Mediterraneans. There is the Mediterranean as defined by climate, another defined by the sea, and yet another defined by history. There is a human Mediterranean marked by movements of its peoples, and it is this Mediterranean that can provide a unifying concept. The human Mediterranean reveals itself through literature, art and architecture, and gastronomy. The movement of peoples has also meant the continual repopulation of the Mediterranean.


From my own point of view I have seen the Mediterranean as North and South, the European side and the African side. This of course has to do with the history of the Magrheb and Algeria in particular. But the North and South of course can be considered the West when seen in relation to the Mashriq. And East and West make more sense for historical purposes which I won't get into too much now.

Yes, the art and architecture of Maghreb have been discussed in this forum in other threads. The Roman mosaics of Tunisia. The Byzantine and Roman ruins in Setif, Algeria. Ancient footprints are petrified next to modern buildings. The Maghreb has a long memory as does the Mediterranean itself.

Edited by chefzadi, 30 April 2005 - 04:13 PM.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#2 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 30 April 2005 - 04:09 PM

Further in this chapter is The Wandering Jew

I mentioned in the Beautiful Algeria thread that for the most part there is no distinction form Jewish Algerian cooking and non-Jewish Algerian cooking. The differences would be related to Kashrut and not in the ingredients or use of aromatics. This is why I had a bit of trouble wrapping my mind around Jewish recipes of the region. In the back of mind the question, "why is this particularly Jewish and not simply Algerian or Moroccan or Tunisian?" lingered.

The discussion in the book is just a few pages, but very concise as is Mr Wright's style of writing. The role of Jews as transporters, exporters and documenters is very clearly stated.

As a side not this reminds me of my Israeli friend who I met in Korea. His mother was a Moroccan Jew. She came to visit and he of course brought her to the restaurant I was working at. She immediately hugged and kissed me allover. It's the bled that we share.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#3 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 14 May 2005 - 09:48 PM

I'm still trying to absorb this book. I read Escoffier and Ducasse's big book with ease. But Clifford Wright's books blow me away. He wrote it in less time then it will take me to comprehend it.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#4 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 03 July 2005 - 01:51 PM

I had the oppurtunity to change the buffet menu for Intro II. I chose a range of recipes from Mr Wright's book so that my students could get a sense of culinary history as well. I will post the menu and more photos later this week. I didn't have a chance to take too many photos. The food was attacked very quickly by the visitors.

I'm off to enjoy the weekend.

Posted Image
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#5 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 09 July 2005 - 08:24 AM

This is the Buffet Menu for The Mediterranean Feast
(Alot of these recipes are fantastic for Summer and easy to make)

Gazpacho- Andalusia
Salata Mishwiya-Maghreb
Salat al-Khudra- Syria
Tarte au Roquefort- Languedoc
Batatis Mirhya-Algeria
Couscous-Magrheb
Safranli Pilavi- Turkey
Moros y Cristianos- Valencia
Harisa-Tunisia
Acili Esme- Turkey
Brik bi’l Tunn- Tunisia
Alboronia- Andalusia
Lu Spaghetti ou Pistou- Provence
Melanzane all Finitese- Calabria
Zagrebacke Glive s Makaronem- Croatia
Poumo d’Amour a l’Antiboise- Provence
Lamb Marqa (tajine)- Maghreb
Shakhsukha al-Bisakra- Algeria
Shish Tawuq- Arab Levant
Arros a Banda- Valencia
Albondigas a la Andalusia
Roast Chicken with Preserved Lemons and Olives- Algerian style
Doner Kebab-Turkey
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#6 FoodMan

FoodMan
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,315 posts

Posted 11 July 2005 - 09:09 AM

Farid-
This is a whole lot of stuff!! How long does it take to prep all that? What is the "game plan" to execute sucha varied buffet?

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com


#7 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 11 July 2005 - 09:31 AM

I'll post about the game plan later.

I want to quickly add that it's a fanatastic buffet, catering, potluck menu.

It's also great for Kosher or Halal menus.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#8 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 12 July 2005 - 06:35 PM

Farid-
This is a whole lot of stuff!! How long does it take to prep all that? What is the "game plan" to execute sucha varied buffet?

Elie

View Post



It took about 3 hours with 36 students. It would take less time and man power with experienced cooks. Remember they are learning and there is time spent on explaining things.

My wife and I could do the prep together in the same time. But we read eachother's minds and have a rhythm going, like a good kitchen line should. I usually piss her off though. Heh, heh.

The game plan is all in the prep or mise en place. Alot of the recipes have the same ingredients. A list is made of the TOTAL ingredients, cuts and amounts.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#9 kanljung

kanljung
  • participating member
  • 69 posts
  • Location:Bay Area, CA

Posted 16 September 2005 - 07:59 AM

I got my copy of this marvellous book yesterday. I've only had time to read the introduction yet. This one will certainly keep me occupied for a very long time.

Thanks Farid, for leading me on to this book!
Christofer Kanljung

#10 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 16 September 2005 - 11:35 PM

Hi Kanljung

Glad to hear you have the book.

Its's really dense with information, non? I appreciate his writing style, very straightforward and energetic. Mr Wright wrote a fascinating peace about Timbuktu

There are more photos of the buffet here.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#11 Swisskaese

Swisskaese
  • legacy participant
  • 1,951 posts
  • Location:Hod HaSharon, Israel

Posted 19 September 2005 - 08:25 AM

I have a question about the Shakhsukha al-Bisakra.

Here in Israel, the Morrocan community makes Shakshouka that is made with merguez sausages, tomatos, eggs, garlic, hot pepper sauce and onion. It is made in a frying pan, cooked on the stove top. The eggs are cooked by making indentions in the pan and gently placing the egg in the indentions. It is served with Harissa.

The Hungarians also have a similiar dish.

Is your dish a cousin of this? It looks like a type of lasagna.

Edited by Swisskaese, 19 September 2005 - 08:26 AM.


#12 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 20 September 2005 - 07:05 AM

Shakhshukkas are egg and vegetable dishes made in a pan as you describe. Sometimes the eggs are stirred in or left whole and placed into indentations and poached.


Shakhsukha al-Bisakra is an entirely different dish with a similar sounding name. Traditionally it's made with rougag. Yes, it can be described as a type of lasagna dish, though not Italian influenced at all.


The Shakhshukkas you describe the Moroccan community in Israel eating sounds more like an Eastern Algerian preparation. Harissa is Tunisian and Eastern Algerian. The Moroccan interest in hot peppers is relatively new. And merguez is more of an Algerian specialty.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems that Algerian jews are the smallest in number in Israel compared to other North Africans.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com

#13 Swisskaese

Swisskaese
  • legacy participant
  • 1,951 posts
  • Location:Hod HaSharon, Israel

Posted 20 September 2005 - 08:29 AM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems that Algerian jews are the smallest in number in Israel compared to other North Africans.

View Post


Yes that is true. I believe that the majority of Algerian Jews emigrated to France.

Israel's North African influences are mainly from Moroccan, Libyan and Ethiopian Jews.

Edited by Swisskaese, 20 September 2005 - 08:30 AM.


#14 chefzadi

chefzadi
  • participating member
  • 2,225 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles (Lyon/Setif)

Posted 20 September 2005 - 10:04 AM

Jacques Derrida would be one of the more famous Algerian Jews who moved to France. He was pretty vocal about Algerian immigrant rights.

Whether we were muslim, pied noirs or jews when we immigrated/exiled to France we simply became Algerian. Equal.
I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts
Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles
http://ecolecuisine.com