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Do you use Boxed Cake Mixes?

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#61 andiesenji

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Posted 25 April 2005 - 09:53 AM

Cakes from scratch are not difficult to produce but sometimes people have varying results when a recipe is passed along, i.e., the texture is different, even the taste may vary.
This is simply because not all ingredients are exactly the same. Baking powder can lose its potency, some eggs have a different flavor, as does butter or shortening, other ingredients also.
Not all flours are the same, and cake flour varies and also does not age well. Fresh cake flour works much better than a box that is over a year old. I have seen this for myself.

Pillsbury, Duncan Hines, Betty Crocker, et. al., spend millions developing box mixes that work every time for every cook, whether they live in Naples, Florida or Nome, Alaska and all points between.
They routinely conduct blind taste testing with up to a hundred ordinary people doing the tasting and often have a few "ringers" - cakes made from scratch, to compare to the box mixes being tested.

I have noting against box mixes and would probably use them if I ever thought to buy them.
However, since I always have the makings for scratch cakes on hand, and it takes me little time to mix one up, I do that, with the exception of the pound cake mixes which I mentioned in an earlier post.
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#62 chefcyn

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Posted 25 April 2005 - 12:02 PM

Hi everyone, the aftertaste most people find so undesireable in mix cakes is most likely from the leaveners they use. I don't know about you, but none of my scratch recipes include sodium aluminum phosphate, monocalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate, or aluminum sulfate. If you make them right, you don't even need baking soda pr powder if you are using a whipped egg white recipe.

From the recipes posted I also see a lot of pure extracts for flavors like Vanilla, most of the box mixes use artificial flavorings--like vanillin which comes from pine trees and has a slight turpentine-ish aftertaste to it to me.

Some people can also taste the food colorants as well.

Now, some people are not offended by these tastes (my absolute favorite cake is Betty Crocker Super Moist Yellow Cake--so much so that I love to lick the beater and spatula--I'd almost rather eat the batter than the baked cake!

I remember in my first baking class back at J&W a million years ago, I tasted the cake batter for a scratch yellow cake we were making and found it YUCKY! I asked the instructor why it tasted so bad and he said I was probably not used to tasting all those raw egg yolks. Well--I think now that it was those weird leaveners I was missing blink.gif

I really like the Betty Crocker Creamy White frosting in the can, too. I find it less sweet, more 'buttery'tasting" than buttercream made with powdered sugar and butter. And that stuff they include with the canned refrigerator cinnamon rolls... rolleyes.gif *sigh* wink.gif

Chocolate cake is another issue. I prefer scratch cake there because you can choose the chocolate you use. Dutch process cocoa is really different from regular, dark chocolate is different from milk chocolate, etc. And canned chocolate frosting is just glurky. There is nothing better, IMHO than real chocolate buttercream.
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#63 BROWNSUGA

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Posted 25 April 2005 - 12:04 PM

We've done some "best of" recipe testing here and I'm not so sure some of the testing has been completed. Have you all read this thread: here. I still don't own a perfect yellow cake recipe. I've got a darn good white cake (look here).........but in blind taste tests I can't win over a mix. Anyone who claims they their scratch cake is better then a mix, I challenge you to post your recipe in the appropriate "best of" thread and offer it up to everyone to test bake. Prove to everyone that your cake is the best, better then any mix. If not...........I think your posting based on prejudices's more then fact.

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For me, I could not compare the two. I remember when I started baking from scratch, my husband tated a cake and said it was different, but good. I told him that the difference was that one was made from a box and one was made from scratch. Even when converting to scratch recipes, I did not want to compare them to the box mixes that I had made. For me, I am not looking for it to be like that of a cake made soley from a mix. I like the texture of scratch cakes. I dont like the texture of cakes made from straight mixes. There are some "doctored" recipes that taste ok, but some of them require just as much work than scratch cakes.

A big part of the choice between using a mix or starting from scratch is your goal. If your goal is simply to bake something in order to serve or eat some cake, then I suppose using a mix would be fine. However, if you're more like me, who takes pleasure in the process and not so much with the end result, then it has to be from scratch. I don't use mixes, but I have enjoyed eating cakes made from mixes. I'm usually the first one to slice into a pistachio cake (yellow cake mix + pistachio pudding mix?) and I go back for seconds. Same for a Kahlua cake made from a mix a co-worker brought one day.

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This is me! I truly enjoy the process just as much as the end result. :biggrin:

#64 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 08:17 AM

As an exclusively scratch baker, I read this thread with great interest. It seems that there is some range as to what we all consider to be a "cake mix." Not having been exposed to higher-end mixes (all-organic, natural flavorings, etc.), my opinions are based on standard grocery store mixes such as Duncan Hines. My own preference for scratch is based on taste, economics, and a desire to not have the finished cake be laden with artificial flavors, hydrogenated fats, and extra emulsifiers. I find the quick-and-easy convenience factor with mixes to be marginal over scratch in a home-baking setting (having never baked professionally, I can't speak for production baking), so in my kitchen, there has never been any reason to go with mixes!

A lot of posters have mentioned that their customers or target audience are used to cake mixes, and that they bake from mixes because that's what the customers want. I'd like to suggest that it's a great goal to open people up to the experience of scratch cakes, which they may not otherwise be exposed to.

I am very active with a local theater company, and every year while planning our season, we get caught between wanted to give our audience what they want (big happy musicals) and presenting fare that our artists are more interested in, such as strong dramas. We always attempt a balance and constantly remind ourselves that if we don't make the strong dramas available, our audiences may never have that exposure -- and may never realize that a strong drama can, in its own way, be as wonderful an experience theatrically as a big, happy musical.

I feel the same way about scratch baking. Most folks may be accustomed to mixes and be leery of anything different, but I love to give them an alternative and hopefully change their expectations. My coworkers are mostly youngish folks, in their mid-20s and early 30s. I started bringing scratch cakes in for office birthdays when I was first hired here about 2 years ago. The look on some of their faces was priceless -- I could tell that many of them had never tasted a scratch cake, made with natural flavorings and real butter (let alone real buttercream) in their lives. Those are the moments I love as a baker.

#65 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 08:19 AM

I've written this before, but I'll add it again. I do use some cake mixes......for various reasons. Only white cake and yellow cake................I've yet to find perfect recipes for those two flavors that people like better then what I can get out of a mix. I only use those on wedding cakes, I make everything else from scratch.

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Wendy,

Have you ever tried the white and yellow butter cake recipes from "Whimsical Bakhouse"? I find them to be exceptional -- moist, flavorful, and with great crumb and slicing properties. I did read the "searching for the best" threads and these recipes did not seem to make it into the discussion. I'd be happy to post or PM these to you if you like to try them!

#66 Kathyf

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 09:17 AM

I use about 90% mixes and 10% scratch and have been in business for 13 years. I tried several scratch white cakes when I first started selling, including the cake bible recipes. I wasn't impressed by them and neither were any of the guniea pigs that taste tested them. Not a single one.
One of my most complimented cakes is a combination of one mix and one scratch recipe. It would be much easier to make either the mix or the scratch, but combining them gives me the best result so that's what I do. For me it's about excellent flavor, neat slices, and satisfied customers. Although I must admit to a wicked inner chuckle when a chef and pastry chef said the half mix half scratch cake was the best they'd tasted.
Everyone has different taste in foods. Although I don't understand why, there are some people who don't care for broccoli. And although I don't understand why, there are some people who prefer a dry scratch white cake that needs to be soaked in syrup to a nice moist mix. Same as I don't understand the people who like carrot cake mixes - with those I prefer scratch. Guess it all comes down to what we grew up with and what our personal tatse is.
I'm not going to try to convert anyone to my way of baking. Why do a few scratch only bakers think they need to convert anyone who use mixes?

#67 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 10:10 AM

Guess it all comes down to what we grew up with and what our personal tatse is.
I'm not going to try to convert anyone to my way of baking. Why do a few scratch only bakers think they need to convert anyone who use mixes?

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Kathy,

I certainly agree that it comes down to personal taste and one's priorities. One of my priorities is to reduce the amount of additives that my family and I consume. Sounds like your priority is satisyfing your customers -- nothing wrong with that. It is my opinion that one can achieve excellent flavor, clean slices, and happy eaters with a scratch cake. Your experience has been otherwise. I don't feel a need to convert anyone (I presume I was the scratch baker you referred to in your post); just presenting my opinions for folks to take or leave.

Edited by RuthWells, 22 June 2005 - 10:11 AM.


#68 browniebaker

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 10:31 AM

Cake mix or from scratch? I think it's just a matter of what taste and texture one grew up with, is used to, or has become used to. In my case, I grew up with both mix and scratch, as my mom was ecumenical. I, too, was ecumenical until I started taking baking "seriously" ten years ago. Now I simply find that scratch cakes taste better. Plus, I like avoiding the chemical additives. That my husband is firmly of the from-scratch school is a major consideration. And my four-year-old daughter and eight-year-old son have never known different from scratch.

Last year, though, in a moment of desperation brought on by a mixture of fatigue and laziness and egged on by manufacturer's coupons, I decided to use a boxed mix and canned frosting for my daughter's birthday cake. A Pillsbury yellow cake, topped with Pillsbury vanilla frosting. Oh, the recriminations! The ignominy. The cake ended up mostly in the trashcan. My family still kid me about that cake.

#69 Patrick S

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 10:33 AM

Guess it all comes down to what we grew up with and what our personal tatse is.
I'm not going to try to convert anyone to my way of baking. Why do a few scratch only bakers think they need to convert anyone who use mixes?

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Kathy,

I certainly agree that it comes down to personal taste and one's priorities. One of my priorities is to reduce the amount of additives that my family and I consume.

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Ruth,

I've always wondered what people mean when they say this. What is an additive? I don't ask sarcastically, I'm just curious what it is in cake mixes that you want to avoid and why.
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#70 Patrick S

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 10:39 AM

Plus, I like avoiding the chemical additives.

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Surely you don't try to avoid salt, baking soda, and baking powder -- they are chemical additives as well. Strictly speaking, of course, every cake is a melange of chemicals, since every ingredient is a chemical or an aggregate of many chemicals. Do you mean, you wish to avoid man-made chemicals?
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#71 ludja

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 10:39 AM

...

A lot of posters have mentioned that their customers or target audience are used to cake mixes, and that they bake from mixes because that's what the customers want.  I'd like to suggest that it's a great goal to open people up to the experience of scratch cakes, which they may not otherwise be exposed to. 

I am very active with a local theater company, and every year while planning our season, we get caught between wanted to give our audience what they want (big happy musicals) and presenting fare that our artists are more interested in, such as strong dramas.  We always attempt a balance and constantly remind ourselves that if we don't make the strong dramas available, our audiences may never have that exposure -- and may never realize that a strong drama can, in its own way, be as wonderful an experience theatrically as a big, happy musical. 

I feel the same way about scratch baking.  Most folks may be accustomed to mixes and be leery of anything different, but I love to give them an alternative and hopefully change their expectations.  My coworkers are mostly youngish folks, in their mid-20s and early 30s.  I started bringing scratch cakes in for office birthdays when I was first hired here about 2 years ago.  The look on some of their faces was priceless -- I could tell that many of them had never tasted a scratch cake, made with natural flavorings and real butter (let alone real buttercream) in their lives.  Those are the moments I love as a baker.

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Thanks for this! :smile:

As an aside, one reason that I don't buy cakes from the supermarket or from many bakeries is that they do taste like they are made from cake mixes and often use frostings made with hydrogenated fats. Similar to what halloweencat expressed earlier in the thread, I don't get any "gustatory pleasture" from these cakes.

Edited by ludja, 22 June 2005 - 10:57 AM.

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#72 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:50 AM

Ruth,

I've always wondered what people mean when they say this. What is an additive?  I don't ask sarcastically, I'm just curious what it is in cake mixes that you want to avoid and why.

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Hi Patrick,

Per my original post, the additives that I object to are artificial flavors (and colors), hydrogenated (or partially-) fats, and extra emulsifiers. I have to stop by the market on the way home tonight, and am planning to check out the ingredients list on a box of cake mix. I'll take notes and post it if you like!
:wink:

#73 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:52 AM

...As an aside, one reason that I don't buy cakes from the supermarket or from many bakeries is that they do taste like they are made from cake mixes and often use frostings made with hydrogenated fats.  Similar to what halloweencat expressed earlier in the thread, I don't get any "gustatory pleasture" from these cakes.

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I'm right there with you on this on, Ludja. I cannot abide Crisco and high-ratio shortening based icings -- ruins the whole cake for me.

#74 Patrick S

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 12:01 PM


Ruth,

I've always wondered what people mean when they say this. What is an additive?  I don't ask sarcastically, I'm just curious what it is in cake mixes that you want to avoid and why.

View Post


Hi Patrick,

Per my original post, the additives that I object to are artificial flavors (and colors), hydrogenated (or partially-) fats, and extra emulsifiers. I have to stop by the market on the way home tonight, and am planning to check out the ingredients list on a box of cake mix. I'll take notes and post it if you like!
:wink:

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Thank you kindly for the offer, but that won't be necessary, as I am already familiar with the ingredients in cake mixes.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#75 Patrick S

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 12:19 PM

I've written this before, but I'll add it again. I do use some cake mixes......for various reasons. Only white cake and yellow cake................I've yet to find perfect recipes for those two flavors that people like better then what I can get out of a mix. I only use those on wedding cakes, I make everything else from scratch.

View Post


Wendy,

Have you ever tried the white and yellow butter cake recipes from "Whimsical Bakhouse"? I find them to be exceptional -- moist, flavorful, and with great crumb and slicing properties. I did read the "searching for the best" threads and these recipes did not seem to make it into the discussion. I'd be happy to post or PM these to you if you like to try them!

View Post


Ruth,

I for one would greatly appreciate it if you would post these recipes to the Best Yellow Cake/Best White Cake threads.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#76 lesfen

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 12:42 PM

I tend to make cakes with butter; not oil, so I'm not sure if some of what I associate with cakes mixes is the texture/flavor of using oil.

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There are several cake mixes now that call for butter instead of oil.

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I use the Hellman's mayo recipe when I do make cakes from the box (mayo instead of the oil). VERY moist and, somehow, they don't seem as cloyingly sweet when I do it that way. I would love to make cakes from scratch, but sometimes it's just not practicle for me. Most people are just happy to have some cake.

Edited by lesfen, 22 June 2005 - 12:46 PM.


#77 Jujubee

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 12:51 PM

I think one of the problems when you talk about mix vs. scratch is that mix cake (due to careful product testing by manufacturers) is a pretty consistent product and scratch cake can be all over the board. It would be so tempting to say "of course homemade is better" but frankly, I've had some pretty atrocious homemade desserts. Some of it is the quality of the recipes, some of it is the skills of the cook, and some of it is many people's tendency to not follow instructions exactly or make substitutions (especially in the name of health. No you cannot make baked goods without butter and expect it to taste the same!).

But beyond that, there's also a question of what is meant by something like white cake. Again, white cake from a mix is pretty consistent, even from different manufacturers. My husband once made me a cake with from-scratch white cake, raspberry almond filling, and frosting with real butter. It totally blew away any white cake I've ever had from a box. But this cake had almond extract in it. Does that still count as white cake? It does in my book. But maybe for some people white refers not only to the color, but also to an absence of flavor. So someone might put parameters around the question and say, can you make a white cake from scratch that is better than a mix cake, but with the caveat that you can't add any flavorings. That's a harder question to answer, because then you're asking a home baker to create a better recipe and yet purposely remove flavor. And don't we often cook at home because the flavors are fresher, brighter, and give some sense of the personality of the cook? For example, when we have debates about the "best" mac and cheese, strong cheeses, unusual combinations, and other signature flavors from the cook are welcome. We don't say, who's got the best mac and cheese, but using only bland cheeses and coming as close as possible to Kraft-in-the-blue-box but somehow better.

So I guess I can't really answer if I would choose mix or scratch for a "plain" white cake. I've never really had a desire to make one just for the sake of it. (A plain butter cake, sure, mmm butter. A plain chocolate cake with great quality chocolate, and plenty of it, sure. And those ARE better from scratch if you have a good recipe and good ingredients.) But to bake a cake and purposely try to remove all flavor from it, to homogenize it as much as possible? What's the point?

Obviously, this doesn't apply to professionals. It's a business, you need to make money. Give the customer what they want and expect. But the fact that the majority of people prefer cake from a mix doesn't really prove to me that it's better. (If popularity proves that something is better, then New Kids on the Block was some of the best music to come out of the last few decades. This is coming from someone who loved NKOTB in their day - go easy on me, I was in elementary school - but even I recognize that a billion screaming girls do not make their songs timeless classics.)

#78 sanrensho

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:37 PM

As a home baker, I've never baked from a cake mix (and I probably never will).

I simply don't see the point in it and wouldn't gain any satisfaction from it. As a child, my house never saw a cake mix of any kind, since my mother was an old school baker. I can honestly say that I've never had any inclination to buy a cake mix.

Edited by sanrensho, 22 June 2005 - 01:37 PM.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

#79 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:49 PM

Ruth,

I for one would greatly appreciate it if you would post these recipes to the Best Yellow Cake/Best White Cake threads.

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Will do -- I'll post them later this evening.

#80 Darcie B

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:51 PM

I was at a wedding last weekend that reaffirmed my dislike for most boxed cake mixes. I know the woman who made the cake and she firmly believes her boxed mixes with Dream Whip added are superior to scratch cakes. She also uses a shortening only "buttercream" with about 2 tablespoons of almond extract in it and prefers its taste over any other frosting. I guess my taste buds are different than hers because I tried a piece of the lemon cake and nearly gagged. I had to spit it out because of the harsh artificial lemon taste. It was more than just the metallic leavening taste I have experienced with boxed mixes, this tasted like a chemistry experiment. It was yellow and it was tart, but it was not lemon. She (and many guests) loved it but I couldn't stand it. To each their own. However, I got a job making a wedding cake for a friend's daughter because I was the only one willing to make a cake from scratch (and apparently one of the few bakers around who likes to use rolled fondant).

Even though I like the taste of scratch cakes better, I admit to envying the consistency of the crumb in boxed mixes. Sometimes my cakes are moist and delicate and sometimes they are a bit crumbly. Guess it's just something I need to work on.
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#81 Toliver

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 03:09 PM

I for one would greatly appreciate it if you would post these recipes to the Best Yellow Cake/Best White Cake threads.

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Let me help Ruth out:

"Yellow and white cakes, search for the perfect"

"White Cake, lets find the BEST recipe for this"

And some others:

"The Best Chocolate Cake, tweaking the recipe"

and another on Chocolate:
"Finding the best Chocolate Cake recipe, do you want to participate?"

"World's best carrot-cake recipe"

"banana cake recipe, Searching for the perfect one"

"I want a Spice Cake recipe, Show me your best!"

"The World's Best Coconut Cake, Gimme"

"Looking for good flourless choc cake recipe, Whose got the best?"

"Strawberry cake recipe?, Like the box kind, only not from a box"

There was also this discussion about Yellow Cakes:
"Need Tried And True Yellow Cake, Preferably moist (duh)"

And these aren't cakes, but were under "the best" category:
"Lemon Bars -- best recipe, anyone interested?"

"Best pecan pie recipes, looking for some buttery goodness"

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#82 Patrick S

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 04:16 PM

I for one would greatly appreciate it if you would post these recipes to the Best Yellow Cake/Best White Cake threads.

View Post

Let me help Ruth out:

"Yellow and white cakes, search for the perfect"

"White Cake, lets find the BEST recipe for this"

And some others:

"The Best Chocolate Cake, tweaking the recipe"

and another on Chocolate:
"Finding the best Chocolate Cake recipe, do you want to participate?"

"World's best carrot-cake recipe"

"banana cake recipe, Searching for the perfect one"

"I want a Spice Cake recipe, Show me your best!"

"The World's Best Coconut Cake, Gimme"

"Looking for good flourless choc cake recipe, Whose got the best?"

"Strawberry cake recipe?, Like the box kind, only not from a box"

There was also this discussion about Yellow Cakes:
"Need Tried And True Yellow Cake, Preferably moist (duh)"

And these aren't cakes, but were under "the best" category:
"Lemon Bars -- best recipe, anyone interested?"

"Best pecan pie recipes, looking for some buttery goodness"

View Post



Thanks for posting the links, Toliver. Maybe we could pin a list of "best of . . ." threads to the top of the forum, so that when new people come to the forum, and they have what they think is the best recipe for X, Y or Z, they would be encouraged to post it. Or maybe not.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#83 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 05:39 PM

I for one would greatly appreciate it if you would post these recipes to the Best Yellow Cake/Best White Cake threads.

View Post

Let me help Ruth out:

"Yellow and white cakes, search for the perfect"

"White Cake, lets find the BEST recipe for this"

And some others:

"The Best Chocolate Cake, tweaking the recipe"

and another on Chocolate:
"Finding the best Chocolate Cake recipe, do you want to participate?"

"World's best carrot-cake recipe"

"banana cake recipe, Searching for the perfect one"

"I want a Spice Cake recipe, Show me your best!"

"The World's Best Coconut Cake, Gimme"

"Looking for good flourless choc cake recipe, Whose got the best?"

"Strawberry cake recipe?, Like the box kind, only not from a box"

There was also this discussion about Yellow Cakes:
"Need Tried And True Yellow Cake, Preferably moist (duh)"

And these aren't cakes, but were under "the best" category:
"Lemon Bars -- best recipe, anyone interested?"

"Best pecan pie recipes, looking for some buttery goodness"

View Post


ROLF, Toliver! You're fueling my insanity! :wink: I know how I'm spending all my free time for the next several weeks....... (Seriously, thanks for the white and yellow cake links!)

#84 RuthWells

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 05:40 PM

Thanks for posting the links, Toliver. Maybe we could pin a list of "best of . . ." threads to the top of the forum, so that when new people come to the forum, and they have what they think is the best recipe for X, Y or Z, they would be encouraged to post it. Or maybe not.

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I think that's a terrific idea, Patrick. It took me 2 whole weeks to find the best white cake thread.......
:wink:

#85 therdogg

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 07:15 PM

I'm not about trying to create more work for myself, but mixes just have a funky metallic aftertaste to me that I can't get over.

Not just cake mixes, but other baking mixes like Bisquick (sp?) and pancake mixes.

#86 foodiehall

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 07:35 PM

I bake cakes from scratch, same for the frosting.
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#87 KarenS

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 08:44 PM

I have never used a cake mix. My mom used them when I was a child. She didn't like to bake. I certainly have tasted them (and shortening buttercream)In my opinion, they taste terrible. No one has ever asked me to use a cake mix. I don't believe in that kind of food. I have spent over 20 years baking- and went to extremes to further my pastry skills.

But I wouldn't eat at McDonalds, Jack in the Box, Burger king etc... too!

#88 Toliver

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 09:00 AM

Thanks for posting the links, Toliver. Maybe we could pin a list of "best of . . ." threads to the top of the forum, so that when new people come to the forum, and they have what they think is the best recipe for X, Y or Z, they would be encouraged to post it. Or maybe not.

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I agree with Ruth...that's a great idea. The only problem I can think of is that you never know if you've got "the best" until the discussion has reached a couple pages and people have had time to experiment (and taste!).

As for mixes vs. scratch, I was raised on mixes. My mom got married in the '50's and was a product of the well-marketed "save time...use a box mix or a can of something" generation. Bisquick, condensed soup, canned bread crumbs...that was what we ate and all we knew.
Today, I don't eat that way very often but don't look my way and expect me to disparage it. I think it's a valid cuisine and I have no problem with people who cook and bake that way. I will even admit to being the proud owner of a copy of the "Cake Mix Doctor" which I will recommend to anyone who won't walk away from me when I start blathering on about how good the recipes are in it. :wink:
It's fine to draw the line and say "I have never used a mix and never will" but where are the shades of gray? I have a good friend who was raised by her grandmother and has always made everything from scratch using her grandmother's recipe book. But even she will use a mix if she doesn't have the time to make something from scratch inbetween taking her kids to school, doing the laundry, paying the bills, etc.
If you have the time to make it from scratch, good for you. But there's no shame in using a mix.

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'
Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”
– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”


#89 prasantrin

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 03:22 PM

I only use boxed if I'm making something for someone else, and I know they're used to things like boxed cake mixes. I'm one of those who can "taste the box"--at least for white and yellow cake mixes. I'm not sure if my taste buds can detect chocolate boxes...

#90 ludja

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 05:43 PM

I only use boxed if I'm making something for someone else, and I know they're used to things like boxed cake mixes.  I'm one of those who can "taste the box"--at least for white and yellow cake mixes.  I'm not sure if my taste buds can detect chocolate boxes...

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Are you sure that others would not like the scratch cakes? (Even if they are different than the mixss they are used to?)

This isn't an accusation or even a suggestion! :smile: I guess it's curiosity that makes me wonder if perhaps they would enjoy a scratch cake. Their opportunities for having one may be limited and having a friend like you that bakes could open up a new experience for them.
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"






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