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Cake Fondant

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198 replies to this topic

#31 Deborah

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 03:26 PM

Hi Deborah! I use Pettinice brand fondant and it handles and tastes great. Personally, I would stay away from Wilton's fondant since I don't care for the taste of it. You really should try a practice cake to get a feel for the fondant. Once you get the hang of it, fondant is very easy to use and gives a beautiful porcelain smooth finish. As Jeanne mentioned make sure your icing underneath is smooth. I think the biggest problem most beginners have with fondant is pleats (folds) at the bottom of the cake. Here's how I avoid pleats. Once you have placed your fondant on top of your cake start smoothing it down the sides starting from the top and working your way down. If you notice you are going to have a pleat, gently lift and then cup the fondant down with your hand(as if you were gently fluffing the skirt of a dress). Continue to do this as you work your way down the side of the cake. This works really well for me and results in no pleats. Also, I would recommend purchasing some fondant smoothers to give a once over after the fondant is completely applied. HTH!

#32 choux

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 06:37 PM

Hi Deborah,
I've taken RLB's chocolate truffle torte on a plane across the country so it will definitely stand up to a trip up the Sea-to-Sky. (Even security at the airport smiles when you have a cake box in your hands) Make sure you chill the cake thoroughly before trying to unmold it and work with it cold because when it is warm it is very soft(and delicious). If you need cake decorating supplies, Ming Wo or The Scoop'n'save (Surrey) has a lot of stuff. I have tiered this cake, 9" and 6" and I used straws for support ans it worked just fine. I don't ahve any fondant advice, I had it once on a wedding cake and thought it was nasty. If you are looking for a white cake, maybe try covering the cake with a white cocolate ganache. 2 coats might be enough to cover the chocolate.

#33 *Deborah*

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 07:24 PM

Wow! you guys are the best!

I went insane today, I got pans, and boards, and I already have a turntable (thank God) and a smoother and a roller and shaper things and stuff to make gum with? for decoration stuff and stencils to help me shape things and colours and brushes...I got two lbs of Callebaut and one lb of Scharffenburger, this is going to be one fabulous damn cake.

I got some Wilton fondant to play with while I try to source the Pettinice in my neighbourhood, I couldn't make it to Ming Wo today, but I'll try there. and I'll go to Surrey if I have to LOL. Putting fondant on a pan to practice is a great idea! thanks! I will certainly do that.

Really, Kate, I appreciate your recipe and your great advice very much, but I will feel much more confident it's as it's supposed to be if I buy the fondant. If it's gross, everyone can leave it on the plate, it's all about the inside anyways.

I don't have Colette Peters' book; I have The Cake Bible, and Dede Wilson's Wedding Cake book, and Kate Manchester's and Bette Matthews'. Between them and you guys I think I have a good chance of pulling this off.

$300-odd later, basically, and I haven't finished yet! and millions in advice from those who know better than I :smile:
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#34 JeanneCake

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 08:51 AM

check out www.qzina.com - they are a distributor in Canada. I don't know what brand of fondant they carry, but you will want to have more experience before you buy the Satin Ice brand - this is a very, very soft fondant and a challenge to work with.

You can ask them directly at www.americanbakels.com and find out who the closest source is to you.

#35 K8memphis

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 09:12 AM

I just read your cake recipe and while I have not made that truffle cake, I'm writing to say don't apply this well-intentioned advise of mine:

"Umm, it's easier for me to put the cake on a board the same size or a teensy bit smaller than the cake & set that on my pedastel turntable - rough ice it with buttercream then roll out the fondant and apply it so the sides of the fondant hang down rather than pool on the tabletop & then trim. Then put the covered cake on the right sized board or whatever. That's what easiest for me.

On your timetable, you can bake the cakes a week or so in advance, and fill them, double wrap with plastic wrap and freeze. Then take 'em out & ice & decorate.

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So in other words, when applying the fondant I am recommending allowing the fondant to pool around the cake on the table - this cake seems too fragile to do it the other way where it hangs down & the cake is suspended over the turntable.

And make it according to the directions - don't freeze it per my advice. I thought you had a regular cake recipe.

The point of the fondant recipe I shared is to give you something to practice with. But whatever works for you, at least you're practicing!!

You can zap fondant in the microwave for a few seconds to help it be more user friendly.

Applying fondant to a cold surface means you need to work quickly to smooth it.

Good Luck!

#36 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 11:33 AM

I make RBL's chocolate oblivion torte frequently. The quality of your chocolate is very important in this item, it's the only flavor. Choose your brand wisely. It's much like eating a plain ganche. I like to add a liquor, oil or herbs to add dimension to it's flavor. This is a rather unusual item and combo with the fondant to use for a wedding cake.
I would suggest you serve it with whipped cream and some fresh berries or berry sauce. Something to lighten and counter balance the heaviness of this. A plain piece with rolled fondant will not be appealing to a wide audience.


To cover this item with rolled fondant will require a thick layer of fondant or you'll have to frost it first with butter cream to whiten it up or your dark cake will show through. You could use white chocolate ganche with added white food coloring-that would probably taste better then frosting this cake. If you could, I think a simple whipped cream frosting would be the best way to finish this cake. But that would effect your traveling and decor.

You'll need to level the batter in your pan before baking this. Attempting to level this "cake" is nearly impossible afterwards. To unmold this, I freeze it in the pan then use a torch to heat the pan. It pops out perfectly and this cake always is smooth, easy to finish.

Typically when I make this item I add other elements to it to make it more interesting. Eating it plain becomes boring to your taste buds quickly. I often use a cake layer or a base of white chocolate for contrast. Then I use some sort of topping too to add a textural contrast too.

I'm not fond of traveling with stacked wedding cakes but because of the density of this cake it should travel well. I also do not believe you'll be able to use straws as your support system with this particular cake. I don't believe you'll be able to insert them thru it's density. Your cake could break as you insert a doweling or any support system to this, so proceed with great caution. If it was 3 layers or less I probably wouldn't use any supports for this item.

#37 choux

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 02:03 PM

Like I said in my previous post I have stacked this cake and travelled with it (Whistler to Squamish) and it was fine. I used straws and inserted them while the cake was fairly cool, not really cold as I was glazing it. The top tier was on a cardboard round, and I think I just let the bottom cake sit on the cake platter so it would "stick" and not slide off on the curves of the road.

#38 *Deborah*

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 07:38 PM

Sinclair, thanks...yes, as I stated in my initial post, I am adding raspberry sauce and Chantilly, and my audience is far from broad...it's 20 die-hard chocoholics, so I expect my Callebaut and Scharffenberger concoction to be enthusiastically received. The bride and I went through a bunch of cakes before deciding on this one.

Hmm, it sounds as though I really do need a layer of ganache..oh well, that's not a problem, although I haven't made a white chocolate one before. I am very happy to know the cake can freeze with no ill-effects; it may need to be stored outside when we get there.

Choux, I am glad to have your same-highway tale, too! I have a friend in a bar that has those nice sturdy black bar straws, so I'll swipe a few of those when the time comes.

If it weren't a challenge, I probably wouldn't be interested in doing it :raz:
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#39 McDuff

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 07:39 PM

but you will want to have more experience before you buy the Satin Ice brand - this is a very, very soft fondant and a challenge to work with.


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Nice. I'm reading this with great interest as my sister and my niece are expecting a trial run of a wedding cake on Christmas Eve, like I don't have enough to do that week. It's probably going to be chiffon genoise with a dacquoise layer, raspberry ginger ganache, Pierre's flourless chocolate brownie, lemon swiss merinque buttercream and ta-da...Satin ice rolled fondant, which I already bought. I don't have a ton of experience using this stuff, but nothing to do with a rolling pin scares me.

#40 JeanneCake

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 04:14 AM

Ice down your table before you roll the Satin Ice fondant, keeping the rolling surface as cool as possible helps a lot with this brand. (don't use one of those ice-filled pins, though!) Or you could try using a silpat or roulpat, but I don't like the pattern it picks up from the mat if you simply place therolled out fondant on the cake and peel off the mat. When I was searching for the Bakels site, I noticed that they were featuring Julie Bashore from House of Clarendon and Colette Peters- both of whom had been Satin Ice advertisers/users previously.

Because it is so soft, it tears easily and that's frustrating to patch or fix. You can avoid some of this by rolling the fondant around the pin to place on the cake rather than using your hands/arms and make sure you're not wearing any rings or bracelets, a watch, etc.

#41 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 07:14 AM

Sometimes when you have a really soft fondant I find it best to leave it thicker when I roll it. Then when I lift it to place it on the cake (I usually drape it across my arms) I find it stretches easily into a thinner layer, just how I would have intended.


If your thin to begin with, thats when you have to worry about it tearing as you adjust it over your cake.

#42 miaomee

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 12:05 AM

The safest to transport multi-tiered cakes would be to box each tier separately and assemble on site. However, for a six tier cake you could do that by stacking every two tier hence end up with 3pcs for easy stacking on site, a stack of two-tier cake is very stable, especially for fondant wrapped cakes.

Straws can be used as dowels for butter cakes filled and frosted with bc and wrapped with fondant, tried and true but make sure you use those solid type of straws like the ones we get from McDonnald's.

Edited by miaomee, 30 December 2004 - 12:07 AM.


#43 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 07:43 PM

Welcome miaomee! Are you a professional cake decorator?

#44 *Deborah*

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 05:56 PM

These are the results of my day of fondant-play:

Posted Image

Please don't laugh, professionals among you! I am pleased with my results. It took a long time to get a good colour; I started with Wilton Leaf Green (the only green available at the store I was in at the time) and as I suppose you can all imagine, that was no good. I made an emergency run to another shop and got some Kelly Green and some Black as they were out of Moss, which I think is probably close to the colour I wanted. There seems to be a whole world of other colours out there, but I still don't know where to buy them. Oh well.

Then of course by the time I had added enough of these other colours to get anywhere near the tint I wanted, my fondant was all goopy...so I added a bit of icing sugar to get back to stiffness. I feel as though I have been pulling taffy all day, and I suppose I actually have. Then rolling, and transferring stencils of ivy in various sizes, then cutting with a knife, then shaping and making the little veins. Then the luster dust! I know they are not really realistic, and they are imperfect and far from uniform, but I think I will be able to make it work.

The fondant I ended up getting for the cake itself is McCall's White Chocolate rolled fondant, which supposedly tolerates refrigeration better than the regular stuff. I was not able to source Pettinice, and American Bakel did not return my email query. If I had realized, I would have gone down to Bellingham or wherever, but by the time my various queries came back, I just ended up with the McCall's which I still had to order from Toronto. But that's OK! So that will be off-white, and I think will look nice with the green I ended up with.

I will post more pictures when I take them; I will not assemble the cake until the day of, I've decided, in fear of the leaves bleeding on to the white fondant.

I will use your recipe for white chocolate ganache to put under the fondant, Wendy (1.5 lbs. white chocolate, 1 c cream, .25 lb butter); do you think that quantity will make enough to cover a 10 x 3 in layer and a 6 x 3 in. layer? I think I might need to double it...:unsure:

Thanks everyone for your encouragement and advice :smile:
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#45 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:25 PM

First, real quick: no one here dare make fun of anyone one elses work, we are about learning and sharing.............so no one should ever feel shy about showing their work. It's a great way to learn from others more advanced.........and there's always someone more advanced, around here!

Sorry for the quick rant.

Anyway I think your leafs look great, I'm certain your bride will too! Yes, shades of green are usually horrible straight out of the jar. I usually wind up adding yellow to get a more life like green as well as black or blue sometimes.

As far as your question on the ganche...........yeks.......you might even want to triple it. It's so thick that you need alot more quanity then you would with a dark chocolate ganche. It's also easier to pour it and have enough that you don't have to go back and patch in ganche on the sides. When your done if you have too much, you can reheat that ganche and use if on or in other desserts.

I can't wait to see your finished cake, I'm sure it will look great! Good Luck!!

#46 K8memphis

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 08:51 AM

Your leaves are beautiful! And you cut them all with a pattern & knife - wow
insert clapping hands smilie faces :smile: Great job.

#47 *Deborah*

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 09:22 AM

:blush: thanks :smile:

I couldn't find suitable cookie cutters, but I find I am not so bad with a knife! who knew?! :raz:
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#48 chefpeon

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 03:16 PM

So what is the "weavy" stuff in the background supposed to be?

#49 *Deborah*

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 03:20 PM

So what is the "weavy" stuff in the background supposed to be?

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It's braid I may or may not use at the seam of the two layers...I may unweave it and just use one strand; or twine two; I won't know till I see it in front of me. My friend who was helping me was good with rolling the fondant out like that, though, so she did a bunch of it (she saw it on the Wilton box and tried it out).
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#50 chefpeon

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 03:34 PM

It's braid I may or may not use at the seam of the two layers...I may unweave it and just use one strand; or twine two; I won't know till I see it in front of me.


You don't think it will dry out to the point where it will break or crack when you go to place it?

#51 *Deborah*

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 03:51 PM

It's braid I may or may not use at the seam of the two layers...I may unweave it and just use one strand; or twine two; I won't know till I see it in front of me.


You don't think it will dry out to the point where it will break or crack when you go to place it?

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It's well-wrapped in plastic...is there something else I should do to keep it more pliable, or refresh it later?

I'm also holding the possibility of just putting some icing there in reserve. I'm making a pile of white chocolate ganache and will likely have enough to tint some green and pipe it in the seam, if I need to. I may just arrange the leaves so that the seam doesn't show. I am not worried about it as I don't have an exact diagram in my head of how it will look, these things come to me when they come to me, and not before. The bride has left it in my hands, so I'm not worried that it will not live up to whatever she is picturing in her head (although of course I'm hoping she's not picturing anything TOO fabulous, but she knows I've never done one before).
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#52 chefpeon

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:35 PM

It's well-wrapped in plastic...is there something else I should do to keep it more pliable, or refresh it later?


Whenever I work with fondant, I have found that it's ok to pre-form stuff like flowers, leaves, balls, individual bows, etc, but when it's something like a long rope that you will have to manipulate later, you can run into trouble because even though you have it well wrapped, the outside STILL forms a skin and it will wrinkle, crack and even break.
Take one of your pre-formed ropes and see how it is.....test to see that you can manipulate it around easily without it cracking or breaking....you'd hate to get a nasty surprise on-site. How much longer will they sit there before you go to assemble your cake?

#53 *Deborah*

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:47 PM

Assembly is slated for Saturday.

I guess I will not have my heart set on using those!!
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#54 bkeith

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 12:36 PM

Assembly is slated for Saturday.

I guess I will not have my heart set on using those!!

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You might try sticking them in the fridge. No guarantees, but it should keep them pliable longer than just sitting at room temp. And if they're well wrapped, they shouldn't get dewey enough to stick together and give you a hassle when you go to unwrap them.

Like I said, no guarantee, but I think the fridge would at least increase your chances of having usable viney things by the time you go to use them.
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#55 *Deborah*

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 12:46 PM

Assembly is slated for Saturday.

I guess I will not have my heart set on using those!!

View Post



You might try sticking them in the fridge. No guarantees, but it should keep them pliable longer than just sitting at room temp. And if they're well wrapped, they shouldn't get dewey enough to stick together and give you a hassle when you go to unwrap them.

Like I said, no guarantee, but I think the fridge would at least increase your chances of having usable viney things by the time you go to use them.

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I can do that! thanks :smile:
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#56 *Deborah*

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 12:51 PM

Well, I have one layer (top) down, one to go!

Working with this fondant is not too bad! It's a bit more pliable than the Wilton stuff, and it tastes good. My results are not perfect; but I made it thick enough that it's got that nice rounded edge, so it looks like a real cake :smile: and the parts at the bottom that did not turn out as smooth as I would have liked (because the fondant caught a chill from the cake and became less pliant, I think) I can cover with my decorations!

Thanks so much to everyone for your help and advice, photos will follow!

Edit: there are photos in my ImageGullet if anyone cares to look. :smile:

Edited by *Deborah*, 19 January 2005 - 11:24 PM.

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#57 *Deborah*

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 06:57 PM

Here it is:

Posted Image

Posted Image

People seemed impressed, and certainly it tasted marvelous!! The McCall's white chocolate fondant was quite tasty! not as good as my favourite type of icing, but more than edible, and nobody peeled it off.

With the cream and the raspberry sauce I made (and squizzled on the plates like I knew what I was doing :raz:) (sorry, I didn't take a photo of a plated piece!), everyone ate their whole portion, which I take as an accolade.

I will not be doing this for every friend that comes along, though...so stressful!

Thanks again, everyone! the rope didn't make, it, btw, but I managed without.
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#58 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 05:56 AM

Congratulations, job well done! I bet the Bride and Groom were thrilled! When they all eat it, thats the best compliment of all.

#59 K8memphis

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 09:09 AM

Deborah - That's beautiful!! The plaid and berries are a great compliment to your gorgeous creation - wonderful work!!!

#60 Chef Metcalf

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 09:49 PM

Deborah,
The cake looks great. Good for you.
Looks like a lot of hours went into that.
How long do you think it took you?

Chef M





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