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The Terrine Topic


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#361 rotuts

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 07:54 AM

PedroG somewhere in the SV thread has a nifty jpg you can print out, cut out, and save as a pasteurization guide by thickness and temp.

pasteurization by temp thickness and time has been worked out.

again thanks for these tips for terrines. Id guess SV is ideal for those T's that don't have a crust nor need browning on the exterior.

#362 HKDave

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:25 AM

Quelle horreur! Someone has used a different technique that that mandated by tradition.

Indeed. That's a nice-looking terrine.

In fact, pates and terrines are as traditional a use of sous vide as there is. The technique was originally developed for cooking foie pate by Chef Georges Pralus at Troisgros in the mid-1960s. Cooking terrines and the like remains one of its most useful applications.

Baron Shapiro, your minimum temperatures are correct if one only takes the terrine to that temperature mometarily. But the temperatures Nick used are safe when the length of time the product is held at that internal temperature is factored in.
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#363 Shalmanese

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 01:23 PM

I agree with Shal.. 130.1 for long enough (true temp) will pasteurization anything, based on thickness. I use 'beer coolers' with an insulated top and it uses almost no energy once temp is reached and I always do as many bags as I can and rapid chill and freeze. This saves time in the future and energy ( a little anyway )


For a thick enough product, holding at 130.1 might allow the core temp to come up too slowly, causing bacterial spoilage before pasteurization. While there would be no more live pathogens, there would be enough byproducts that the product would be unpleasant or even unsafe to eat. You still need to have a rigorous understanding of microbiology to safely SV or to follow well tested guidelines.
PS: I am a guy.

#364 boondocker

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 03:58 PM

Personally I think SV is greatly overused these days. There is something to be said about the skill involved in doing a pate the classical way. Plus all tge safety issues that have ben raised in this thread as well

#365 nickrey

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 06:57 PM

It's a way of cooking that has its uses, nothing more, nothing less. If it's better than the traditional way or produces a result that I like more, I'll use it; if not, I won't.

Sticking steadfastly to tradition has never been something I've particularly understood nor desired to do in my cooking or elsewhere. As you say, it is a personal preference.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
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#366 Baron d'Apcher

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:12 AM

Chicken galantine. Amish chicken bathed in Madeira and brandy. A garnish of the breasts, Jamón Ibérico, confit gizzards, fatback and green peppercorns. Wrapped in its skin, then in cheesecloth. Gently poached, traditionally, in court-bouillion. Lemon zest and dhania coriander seasoning.

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Gin-soaked currant and toasted Marcona almond pâté. Some heart, corned tongue, smoked deckle and thyme all up in there. Currants and slivered almonds along the top.

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#367 nickrey

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 04:18 PM

Those are works of art Baron.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#368 Baron d'Apcher

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 06:24 PM

Sour Cherry and Randall-Lineback Pâté en Croûte beats Harvard and Yale: Special Ivy League Edition.
Pork, Randall-Lineback rose veal, corned tongue, confit heart, Sicilian pistachios, green peppercorns and such.

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#369 boondocker

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 09:44 AM

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Lake supeior whitefish with lemon parsley and caper. It got knocked off the heart during service while out was poaching I think that made it a, little grainy. Could have used more salt also, first fish mousseline though

Edited by boondocker, 31 August 2012 - 09:46 AM.


#370 Baron d'Apcher

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 06:45 PM

Pigeon, Gin-Soaked Currant and Toasted Almond Pâté en Croûte: Special Longshot Dark-Meat Horse Edition. Submission to qualify for the 2012 World Pâté Croûte Championship in Tain l’Hermitage, France.

No dove, no love
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Pastry feathers and almonds; juniper berries and culeb peppercorns as currants.
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Pigeon breast, liver farce à gratin, gizzards, almonds, currants, fatback, whathaveyou.
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#371 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 08:30 PM

Beautiful pâté en croûte. I am intrigued by the world championship but your link does not work for me.
Terrines and pâtés are the ultimate potluck dishes (which is why French potlucks are so great)!

#372 Baron d'Apcher

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 09:03 PM

www.championnatdumondepatecroute.com/le_blog/

#373 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 09:29 PM

www.championnatdumondepatecroute.com/le_blog/


Thanks!

#374 janeer

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 11:43 AM

Seriously, baron, if you don't win, I don't know what to say. Rigged!

#375 DianaB

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 01:02 PM

I second Janeer's comment. I follow your posts on this thread with amazement and respect. Bon chance!

#376 boondocker

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 07:41 PM

Seafood terrine. Scottish salmon with scallop, shrimp, parsley and lemon.

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#377 Baron d'Apcher

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 05:18 PM

Pork, Apricot, Pistachio Pâté en Croûte. Special Inadvertent-Argyle-Peppercorn-Nipple Edition

Dot Matrix
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One fell off the pâté nest.
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Meat Mondrian
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#378 pep.

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:16 AM

Pâté en croûte de Faisan and Terrine de chevreuil et canard:



1 - Pastete ganz.jpg

2 - Pastete aufgeschnitten.jpg

The terrine was made sous-vide while the pâté was cooked conventionally (too a core temperature a tad to high, I'd say, but all my recipe books were very conservative in that regard). The pâté includes dried figs stewed in port, as well as pistachios. Both were made with curing salt.

For the (campagne-style coarse grind) terrine I included some beef as a filler meat, but no lard, which left it not as unctuous as it ought to have been. A small amount of veal was included in addition to the pheasant meat in the pâté. The crust was made with suet (which I should have chopped more finely). Both tasted quite nice, though.

#379 rotuts

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:52 AM

except for the posstaccios :blink: ,

Yum!

#380 pep.

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:57 AM

except for the posstaccios :blink: ,

Yum!


You don't like pistachios? I'm tempted to say "but they are the best part", but that's not quite true. I do think they add a nice textural element, though.

#381 rotuts

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 10:40 AM

maybe some other nut? for some reason I just cant stand them. but they appear often in terrines so someone thinks this adds something. and mortadella, etc. fortunately there are versions of The Mort w/o a fav. here

but your stuff really does look stunning!

#382 Baron d'Apcher

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:27 PM

The aforeposted pictures and a detailed recipe were assessed by the Pâté Croûte committee and was deemed up to snuff by Le President des Tocques Blanches (Christophe Marguin), securing me a place among the 12 finalists. I am the first (and so far only) American (though I am also a French citizen) to have qualified for the competition (the 4th edition) and will have the undesirable handicap of having traveled the farthest with 3 pâtés and accoutrements stowed at the mercy of baggage handlers on both sides of the Atlantic. I will compete (on behalf of Bryan Voltaggio's Range restaurant in Friendship Heights, Washington DC) against chefs from tiny kitchens and 7 Michelin star rated brigades then be judged by MOF’s and experts in the craft. Thank you to Egullet and its members for allowing me a venue to show my work.

Highlights from the past competitions:
CMPC 2009
CMPC 2010
CMPC 2011

2.0 Special Cocoa Edition:


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#383 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:08 PM

Amazing work! I wish you good luck, Baron.

#384 rotuts

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 06:58 AM

thanks you and good luck!

wish the vids were much longer!

#385 boondocker

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 10:10 AM


except for the posstaccios :blink: ,

Yum!


You don't like pistachios? I'm tempted to say "but they are the best part", but that's not quite true. I do think they add a nice textural element, though.

maybe some other nut? for some reason I just cant stand them. but they appear often in terrines so someone thinks this adds something. and mortadella, etc. fortunately there are versions of The Mort w/o a fav. here

but your stuff really does look stunning!


I love to use pistachios also, but my chef is allergic to tree nuts so 95% of the time I have to substitute to get that textural feel. whole or slightly crushed pumpkin seeds seem to work the best. Coarse ground pumpkin seeds tend to meld into the pate too much and sunflower seeds are a little too small also, perhaps roasted and used sparingly with confeed gizzards and hearts they would work well though.


The aforeposted pictures and a detailed recipe were assessed by the Pâté Croûte committee and was deemed up to snuff by Le President des Tocques Blanches (Christophe Marguin), securing me a place among the 12 finalists. I am the first (and so far only) American (though I am also a French citizen) to have qualified for the competition (the 4th edition) and will have the undesirable handicap of having traveled the farthest with 3 pâtés and accoutrements stowed at the mercy of baggage handlers on both sides of the Atlantic. I will compete (on behalf of Bryan Voltaggio's Range restaurant in Friendship Heights, Washington DC) against chefs from tiny kitchens and 7 Michelin star rated brigades then be judged by MOF’s and experts in the craft. Thank you to Egullet and its members for allowing me a venue to show my work.


Congratulations Baron! Good luck, I look forward to hearing about the competition.

#386 pep.

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 02:41 AM



except for the posstaccios :blink: ,

Yum!


You don't like pistachios? I'm tempted to say "but they are the best part", but that's not quite true. I do think they add a nice textural element, though.

maybe some other nut? for some reason I just cant stand them. but they appear often in terrines so someone thinks this adds something. and mortadella, etc. fortunately there are versions of The Mort w/o a fav. here

but your stuff really does look stunning!


I love to use pistachios also, but my chef is allergic to tree nuts so 95% of the time I have to substitute to get that textural feel. whole or slightly crushed pumpkin seeds seem to work the best. Coarse ground pumpkin seeds tend to meld into the pate too much and sunflower seeds are a little too small also, perhaps roasted and used sparingly with confeed gizzards and hearts they would work well though.


With pistachios, I think it's not just the textural element, but also the color. Sunflower seeds or even other nuts simply won't stand out the same way. Pumpkin should work in that regard, though. Personally, I would not crush them for use in a terrine or pâté.

#387 boondocker

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 11:21 AM

Agreed nothing contrasts as nicely as pistachio. green peppercorns are too dark. died cherries work nicely in that regard if the pate is light enough, but with lots of liver in tge pate its usually too red for that. I find that whole pumpkin seeds have a habit of finding their way to the outside of the forcemeat leading to undesirable slices with the seed falling out though.

#388 janeer

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:00 PM

Spectacular as always, Baron; you do your restaurant proud. Congratulations on reaching the finals and let us know how it all comes out. Exciting for you.

#389 Hendrik

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:37 AM

Wow that's amazing Baron. Good luck in the competition!

#390 ldubois2

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 04:03 PM

Looking for advice: Pre-novice at this...for Thanksgiving made the Country Pate from the Dean and Delucca cook book. I made it without too much forethought, going to my local butcher thinking they'd have pork fat. Ha! With a need to improvise, I purchased very fatty salt pork, removed the fat and substitued after soaking it to remove some of the salt. Cut the meat manually as suggested, and it turned out ok.

After reading much of this thread (and loving the pictures) I am now ready to try again. I have Bourdain's Les Halles cookbook and plan to do pate de campagne. Problem: Pork liver. My local, better grocer has veal liver and I purchased that on impulse when they did not have pork fat...now think it is likely too delicate a flavor, am I right? Would there be something better to use? These guys will save pork fat for me and have ordered that. They would not slice fat to line the mold, and had nothing they'd suggest.

After I made the original Thanksgiving pate I looked on line to see if I could purchase jawl fat (what the Dean and Delucca says is the best option) and in error purchased caul fat. Jowl, caul...know the difference now. I received 10 pounds of caul fat which I divided into small packets and have frozen. (available in the US on Amazon.com).

Also the D&D did not suggest weighing it down. It was tasty but crumbled, pieces did not stay together once sliced.

Thank you for any help. Making gravlax and sausage for Christmas and this will be a great addition!