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Freezing Chocolates & Confections

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52 replies to this topic

#31 sote23

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:15 PM

yes, andrew did mention the freezing in class. instead of vacuum sealing, he heat wraps the boxes, and the whole container as well. maybe we can get him to chim in on the subject.

Luis

#32 Mary F

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 08:01 AM

Thanks everyone for the great response! I did remember Wybauw saying he froze chocolates, but my mind must have been wandering (bad habit) as I didn't have any notes on it.
I do like the pre-fridge to freezer, prev. my thought was just to go straight to the freezer and then defrost in fridge for 24 hours. I will be using everyone's advice and giving it a try.

#33 sote23

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Posted 18 April 2007 - 01:32 AM

Thanks everyone for the great response!  I did remember Wybauw saying he froze chocolates, but my mind must have been wandering (bad habit) as I didn't have any notes on it.
I do like the pre-fridge to freezer, prev. my thought was just to go straight to the freezer and then defrost in fridge for 24 hours.  I will be using everyone's advice and giving it a try.

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I haven't tackled freezing chocolates yet, but will soon. I know chocolates can be frozen, but has anyone froze ganache? can it also be frozen?

Luis

#34 Serj

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Posted 18 April 2007 - 06:36 PM

Anything with over 25% fat can be frozen okay.

#35 sote23

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Posted 18 April 2007 - 10:54 PM

Anything with over 25% fat can be frozen okay.

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good to know. thanks for the info.
luis

#36 Mary F

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 07:23 AM

Luis,
I have frozen ganache with good results. I used to allow to defrost in the fridge and then some time at room temp, and then enrobe. If I needed it for piping into molds I would throw in the microwave for seconds at 50% power. Now that we are using tempered chocolate for the ganache though, I might be messing with the temper if I do that. But your pieces for enrobing should do well.

#37 alanamoana

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 09:21 AM

Mary, I don't think it is a problem. Remember during the class that Wybauw micro'd some leftover ganache to demonstrate the slam filling method. I think he was just cautious not to take it too hot. You've probably been doing it right all this time! :wink:

#38 Stacey TC

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 08:08 PM

I have a small candy-making business and will be on maternity leave soon. A couple customers have asked if they could order toffee and caramel soon and freeze it until the holidays. I'm not sure what to advise- I'm seeing conflicting information about if it will affect texture or "stickiness"

Anyone have personal experience freezing these candies?

#39 Kerry Beal

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 06:31 AM

I don't know if the wrapping, heat or vacuum sealing, then taking them from the freezer to the fridge, then room temperature over a couple of days that you do when freezing chocolates will prevent the condensation problem or not. Certainly if condensation gets on the surface you are going to end up with sticky toffee.

Why not try some experiments, wrapped and unwrapped just freezing them overnight before taking them back out. Doesn't really matter how long they are frozen for, it's the thawing where the problems are going to happen.

The other thought is whether or not your toffees and caramels are fine until the holidays anyway. I know the chewy caramels I make would have a several month shelf life at least. The toffees (I'm thinking buttercrunch) tend to attract water, but sealed in a vacuum container would be fine.

#40 Stacey TC

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 08:03 PM

Thanks for the suggestions Kerry.
I have never tried vacuum sealing- I will look into that.

I do think the caramels are probably fine without freezing, if stored well. It's a very old family recipe and I can remember my great-grandma actually coming up from the cellar in the middle of summer with caramels in hand that had been made the previous winter. They always tasted great to me!

Edited by Stacey TC, 07 October 2007 - 08:03 PM.


#41 David J.

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:30 PM

Can I safely freeze dual layer truffles with a layer of ganache and a layer of pate de fruit or marshmallow on top?

#42 Kerry Beal

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 06:51 PM

I don't know the answer to this - I suspect you are going to have to do some experimenting with indivual pieces to find out.

Let us know your results.

I kind of suspect the pate de fruit is going to weep when it thaws.

#43 David J.

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 09:02 PM

I don't know the answer to this - I suspect you are going to have to do some experimenting with indivual pieces to find out. 

Let us know your results.

I kind of suspect the pate de fruit is going to weep when it thaws.

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I was afraid that might be the case. I'm making several different pieces to go in a variety box and I guess that I'll just have to leave the questionable items until last so I don't have to freeze them. That way I can freeze a handfull to check it out without risking whole batches.

So, does honey freeze well? I want to add the Buckwheat Beehives to the mix and they have a center of pure honey. Or maybe if it's a butter ganache it will have a low water activity and long enough shelf life.

#44 Kerry Beal

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 04:52 AM

I don't know the answer to this - I suspect you are going to have to do some experimenting with indivual pieces to find out. 

Let us know your results.

I kind of suspect the pate de fruit is going to weep when it thaws.

View Post



I was afraid that might be the case. I'm making several different pieces to go in a variety box and I guess that I'll just have to leave the questionable items until last so I don't have to freeze them. That way I can freeze a handfull to check it out without risking whole batches.

So, does honey freeze well? I want to add the Buckwheat Beehives to the mix and they have a center of pure honey. Or maybe if it's a butter ganache it will have a low water activity and long enough shelf life.

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I think that honey has high enough solutes that it won't actually freeze but that doesn't mean you can't put them in the freezer.

#45 David J.

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 11:02 PM

I picked up a cheap food vacuum system that I spotted in the local grocery store last week. Today I tripped over a thread on it in the Kitchen Consumer area: Hand-held vacuum food saver, Can it be as good as it sounds?. The gist is that people really like it so I ran out and bought one today.

It uses ZipLock style bags with a one-way valve. Here is the one gallon bag before evacuating:

Posted Image

The directions said to be sure part of the food projected into the special ribbed area to ensure the vacuum sealed the food well. I was worried that this would mean that the truffles in the bottom wouldn't be sealed well, but that proved to be unfounded.

After:
Posted Image

The final result uses up a little more space in your freezer than other methods of packing, but it really did a nice job of removing all the air from the package.

Even though the instructions tell you not to reuse the bags, I think I can get away with it for truffles. The main reason against it seems to be the idea of juices getting stuck in the ribbed area and chocolates won't have that problem. A skeptical person might suspect the real reason is to sell more bags a-la the razor blade or printer cartridge model, but I'll give them the benefit of the doubt.

This looks to be an easy and effective method for freezing truffles. Since the vacuum is manually controled you can even stop it before it gets total in order not to crush delicate items.

#46 Desiderio

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 04:36 PM

Great system, let us know how they thaw out ( spelling sorry ).
Vanessa

#47 readingrilke

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 07:46 PM

Can I safely freeze dual layer truffles with a layer of ganache and a layer of pate de fruit or marshmallow on top?

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Hello,


We did it a week ago with a couple hundred PBJ's, all we did was put them on a full sheet pan, wrap them in cling film tightly and straight into the freezer...no special bags, vacuum, etc.

Took them out and put them in the low boy over night and took them out the next morning...taste like heaven...so...go figure....

#48 David J.

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 01:59 PM

Can I safely freeze dual layer truffles with a layer of ganache and a layer of pate de fruit or marshmallow on top?

View Post


Hello,


We did it a week ago with a couple hundred PBJ's, all we did was put them on a full sheet pan, wrap them in cling film tightly and straight into the freezer...no special bags, vacuum, etc.

Took them out and put them in the low boy over night and took them out the next morning...taste like heaven...so...go figure....

View Post


Great! That's just what I was hoping to hear.

#49 miladyinsanity

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 02:29 PM

I don't know the answer to this - I suspect you are going to have to do some experimenting with indivual pieces to find out. 

Let us know your results.

I kind of suspect the pate de fruit is going to weep when it thaws.

View Post



I was afraid that might be the case. I'm making several different pieces to go in a variety box and I guess that I'll just have to leave the questionable items until last so I don't have to freeze them. That way I can freeze a handfull to check it out without risking whole batches.

So, does honey freeze well? I want to add the Buckwheat Beehives to the mix and they have a center of pure honey. Or maybe if it's a butter ganache it will have a low water activity and long enough shelf life.

View Post

I think that honey has high enough solutes that it won't actually freeze but that doesn't mean you can't put them in the freezer.

View Post

Umh, if it doesn't freeze, wouldn't it mean that it wouldn't weep and therefore be okay?
May

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#50 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 02:35 PM

I don't know the answer to this - I suspect you are going to have to do some experimenting with indivual pieces to find out. 

Let us know your results.

I kind of suspect the pate de fruit is going to weep when it thaws.

View Post



I was afraid that might be the case. I'm making several different pieces to go in a variety box and I guess that I'll just have to leave the questionable items until last so I don't have to freeze them. That way I can freeze a handfull to check it out without risking whole batches.

So, does honey freeze well? I want to add the Buckwheat Beehives to the mix and they have a center of pure honey. Or maybe if it's a butter ganache it will have a low water activity and long enough shelf life.

View Post

I think that honey has high enough solutes that it won't actually freeze but that doesn't mean you can't put them in the freezer.

View Post

Umh, if it doesn't freeze, wouldn't it mean that it wouldn't weep and therefore be okay?

View Post

It was the pates de fruit I was concerned about the weeping with, not the honey.

#51 escry

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 03:50 PM

I have successfully frozen and defrosted a dual layer ganache and pate de fruit enrobed confection.

Just follow usual rules of 1) tight packing and suitable wrapping; 2) put in the fridge for 12-24 hours then into the freezer on the way in; 3) put in the fridge for 12-24 hours from frozen on the way out.

#52 Mary F

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 05:38 PM

I have frozen the ganache/marshmallow layers with no problem!

#53 ejw50

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 09:54 PM

Andrew Shotts freezes, and in his book he makes lots of pate de fruits. Maybe sote23 could answer for sure though, as he went to his class.


I use a foodsaver to vacuum seal and buy the bags off ebay. Works great for me on the standard-type chocolates that I make. Same technique as you - stopping before 100% vacuum to prevent crushing. Works great, most useful for condensation control.





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