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Campari Cocktails


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195 replies to this topic

#61 Chris Amirault

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 02:22 PM

Try it and let us know!
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#62 Vesper Lynd

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 04:26 PM

Aperol is very similar to Campari, it's a little sweeter, more fruity and far less bitter, so would probably be a good stepping stone for someone unfamiliar with the up front bitterness of Campari. It is also only 11% abv as compared to Camparis 25% abv.

Apperol and grapefruit juice is a great summer drink.
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#63 eje

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 12:23 PM

Saw this in Sunday's NY Times "Shaken and Stirred" Column...

Fergus Henderson digs Campari!

The Perfect Match With Pig’s Tails*, Jonathan Miles

BICYCLETTE
Adapted from Fergus Henderson

2 ounces Campari.
1 ½ounces dry white wine.

Add Campari to a wine glass, fill 2/3 up the glass with ice and add wine. Stir, taste and adjust as desired.

The drink is known in its native Italy as a Bicyclette — owing, Mr. Henderson said, to the old men who drink it and then “go weebling home upon their bicycles.” Bracing and bittersweet, it is simplicity defined: nearly equal parts white wine and Campari, served over ice. “As an aperitif, it does wonders,” said Mr. Henderson, who leads off his second cookbook, “Beyond Nose to Tail,” with the recipe for the drink, and who featured it at a pair of New York dinners last month, at Savoy and the Spotted Pig, when he was in the city to promote the book’s release.


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#64 Danne

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:26 PM

I really like to muddle some lime, lemon and grapefruit in a dubble whiskyglas, ad campari, sugarsyrup and crusshed ice.
Very easy, very nice.

#65 Kent Wang

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 05:09 AM

What gives Campari such a red color? Is it artificial?

The current issue of Drinks includes a Wondrich-named variation on the Negroni called the Typing Monkey using bianco vermouth instead of rosso. Sipping one now, it is nice and lighter than a Negroni. The red color also comes through more.

#66 eje

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 08:18 AM

What gives Campari such a red color? Is it artificial?

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Campari was originally colored with Cochineal.

I thought I had read somewhere that they no longer color it with that substance, but see my bottle sez, "Colored with Natural Carmine".

Is "Drinks" a magazine?
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#67 slkinsey

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 08:28 AM

AFAIK, carmine is made from chochineal.
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#68 eje

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 10:20 AM

AFAIK, carmine is made from chochineal.

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Yes, that was my point. My bottle, albeit a bit old, is labeled as being colored with "Natural Carmine" (Cochineal) not any other artificial substance.

I'm pretty sure, though, that I had read that they had relatively recently discontinued using real cochineal to color Campari. Could be wrong about that, though.
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#69 jlo mein

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 06:28 PM

I'm pretty sure, though, that I had read that they had relatively recently discontinued using real cochineal to color Campari.  Could be wrong about that, though.

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I have no idea how recent my bottling of Campari is (bought it from a local BC Liquor Store last month), but it lists the ingredients as sugar, alcohol, aromatic herbs, and carmine.

#70 slkinsey

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 07:21 PM

Did some digging. Seems the "new label" Campari does not contain natural carmine. But one assumes it will take quite some time for the old stock to become scarce in this country.
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#71 eje

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 10:11 PM

Apparently, there is a real chance of a severe allergic reaction and anaphylactic shock with a certain small subset of the human population when exposed to natural carmine/cochineal.

I assume this informed gruppo campari's decision to remove it from Campari.

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#72 Pierogi

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 12:24 AM

Did some digging.  Seems the "new label" Campari does not contain natural carmine.  But one assumes it will take quite some time for the old stock to become scarce in this country.

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Hmmmmmmmmmmm, I actually had wondered tonight when I broke open my latest bottle why the label had changed. Now I guess I know. Unfortunately the old bottle is at the bottom of the recycling bin, so I can't dig it out to compare the ingredient lists.

Edit---all together now---recycling has TWO "c"s......r-e-c-y-l-i-n-g doesn't really spell anything much.

Edited by Pierogi, 09 December 2007 - 12:26 AM.

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#73 gethin

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 07:05 AM

Apparently, there is a real chance of a severe allergic reaction and anaphylactic shock with a certain small subset of the human population when exposed to natural carmine/cochineal.

I assume this informed gruppo campari's decision to remove it from Campari.

Pesky arthropods spoiling all our fun.

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The UK importer of Nardini's Rabarbero pushes the fact that it does not contain cochineal, unlike Campari, and was therfore a Kosher alternative to Campari. This may have possibly some bearing on Campari's decision to abandon the traditional squashed beetle colouring.


Gethin

#74 jlo mein

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 11:42 PM

So if on my bottle it says "carmine" instead of "natural carmine" under the indredients, does it mean it has artificial colouring? Or will the indredients specifically list "artificial colouring"?

#75 blue_dolphin

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 01:51 AM

Just tried the Bicyclette that eje linked to above. Very tasty.

So if on my bottle it says "carmine" instead of "natural carmine" under the indredients, does it mean it has artificial colouring?  Or will the indredients specifically list "artificial colouring"?

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My current bottle (purchased 2-3 months ago) does not list ingredients but "ARTIFICIALLY COLORED" appears below the US Govt warning for alcoholic beverages. Don't know how that compares to CA labeling.

Edited by blue_dolphin, 06 January 2008 - 02:01 AM.


#76 C. sapidus

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 09:03 PM

For the uninitiated, the first drink I'll use to introduce them to what Campari is all about, is the Jasmine (as already mentioned by JAZ)...

Jasmine
1 1/2 ounces gin
1 ounce Cointreau
3/4 ounce Campari
1/2 ounce lemon juice
Shake with ice. Strain into a cocktail glass.

If you like grapefruit juice, you'll love the Jasmine.

We made this the other night. It is truly delicious, and does taste remarkably like grapefruit juice.

Old Pal
1 ounce rye or bourbon whiskey
3/4 ounce dry vermouth
3/4 ounce Campari
Stir with ice. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.

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This was nice, in a "put hair on your chest" sort of way. :wink:

#77 yagophil

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 05:59 PM

I like Negroni's made with Punt E Mes for the sweet vermouth...

Many years back at a little bar in St. Tropez I asked the bartender for a "house cocktail". He clearly didn't have any in mind, thought a bit, and gave me a red drink he called "Americano". Now, I had never heard of an "Americano" before, nor had I tasted Campari. After one taste I thought for sure the bartender was laughing at the dumb "Americano" at the bar because of all the foul, bitter tasting gunk he put in! :shock:

Later I realized that it was a properly made Americano, and there was nothing wrong with Franco-American relations that day. :biggrin:

#78 Alchemist

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 09:31 AM

This is a total gateway cocktail for people who don't think they like the bitter cordials.

First, a couple days before you are having a party, infuse 4 cups of gin (a good srtong one like Tanq or Beefeater) 2 cups of Maraschino (Luxardo) and a cup of Campari with a pineapple that had been skinned and sliced into thick wedges. Let sit for at least 24 hours, 48 is better.

This cocktail is all pineapply goodness then with Campari creeps up on you.


The Riviera
2 oz Pineapple Infused Campari
.75 oz Fresh Lemon Juice
.75 oz Simple Syrup
1 Egg White

Glass: Coupe
Garnish: Mint Leaf, 5 drops of orange bitters.
Ice: None

Mime Shake. Add KD. Shake. Strain. Serve up.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#79 JerseyRED

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 04:09 PM

The Riviera

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I will have to give this one a try before the month is out!
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#80 jsmeeker

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 07:15 PM

This is a total gateway cocktail for people who don't think they like the bitter cordials.

First, a couple days before you are having a party, infuse 4 cups of gin (a good srtong one like Tanq or Beefeater) 2 cups of Maraschino (Luxardo) and a cup of Campari with a pineapple that had been skinned and sliced into thick wedges.  Let sit for at least 24 hours, 48 is better.

This cocktail is all pineapply goodness then with Campari creeps up on you.


The Riviera
2 oz Pineapple Infused Campari
.75 oz Fresh Lemon Juice
.75 oz Simple Syrup
1  Egg White

Glass:  Coupe
Garnish: Mint Leaf, 5 drops of orange bitters.
Ice:  None

Mime Shake.  Add KD.  Shake.  Strain.  Serve up.

Toby

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what is "mime shake" and what is "KD"?? I'm sure you've used these terms here before, but they are not clicking with me right now.

Speaking of Campari, I just finished off a Caricature Cocktail. Spied it in Joy of Mixology

Gin
sweet vermouth
triple sec
Campari
grapefruit juice.

Pretty nice. Man.. Do I love Campari.

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#81 slkinsey

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 08:32 PM

"Mime shake" means to shake the liquid ingredients without any ice (sometimes also called "dry shaking" or "pre-shaking"). This helps with egg drinks to emulsify the eggs and whip air into them. After you do this, you add the ice and shake again.

"KD" = Kold Draft ice cubes. At home, you can use regular ice cube trays, or you can buy trays that will make actual cubic ice cubes that are similar in size to Kold Draft cubes. Or, what I like best, is one cube of "big ice" (approximately 2x2) and several KD-sized cubes. I find that this works best, especially for egg drinks.
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#82 jsmeeker

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 08:17 AM

"Mime shake" means to shake the liquid ingredients without any ice (sometimes also called "dry shaking" or "pre-shaking").  This helps with egg drinks to emulsify the eggs and whip air into them.  After you do this, you add the ice and shake again.

"KD" = Kold Draft ice cubes.  At home, you can use regular ice cube trays, or you can buy trays that will make actual cubic ice cubes that are similar in size to Kold Draft cubes.  Or, what I like best, is one cube of "big ice" (approximately 2x2) and several KD-sized cubes.  I find that this works best, especially for egg drinks.

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ah.. excellent.. I have done "mime shaking" before for exactly the reasons you state. I just didn't know that was a term for the technique.

If I ever had the space/setup and money, I would love a small Kold Draft icemaker at home. Thanks for the clearing up "KD" as well.

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#83 slkinsey

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 08:23 AM

I wouldn't say that there is any codified or generally accepted terminology for shaking the ingredients together without the ice. Not sure I've heard anyone say "mime shake" before. I simply inferred the meaning from Toby's recipe (which includes an egg white) and the instructions.
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#84 Alchemist

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 01:01 PM

The term that I have heard the most is "dry shake" and that just doesn't make any sense, there's plenty of liquid in the shaker. When you shake with kold-draft it's really loud. So it's suprising and a little disorenting to see some one shaking in silence.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#85 Chris Amirault

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 07:40 AM

In a frenzy of pineapple infusion this weekend (including three big rum jobs), I have about 2c of original Campari infusing with pineapple. In a few weeks I'll try an adjusted Riveria with this not-quite-right infusion (missing the gin and maraschino) -- but if anyone (Toby?) has tips before then, do let me know.
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#86 bostonapothecary

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 07:52 AM

In a frenzy of pineapple infusion this weekend (including three big rum jobs), I have about 2c of original Campari infusing with pineapple. In a few weeks I'll try an adjusted Riveria with this not-quite-right infusion (missing the gin and maraschino) -- but if anyone (Toby?) has tips before then, do let me know.

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i don't infuse my pineapples. i juice and clarify them... i also like them in a mature preserve... fresh pineapple is a beautiful thing but mature oxidized pineapple can have an old wine sort of character...

if you have any wray and nephews laying around there is a good rum punch recipe on my site...
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#87 Chris Amirault

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 05:29 PM

The Riveria is ingenious. There's been a crush of ripe pineapples up here, and I urge all to try this out.
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#88 Alchemist

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 06:37 PM

In a frenzy of pineapple infusion this weekend (including three big rum jobs), I have about 2c of original Campari infusing with pineapple. In a few weeks I'll try an adjusted Riveria with this not-quite-right infusion (missing the gin and maraschino) -- but if anyone (Toby?) has tips before then, do let me know.

View Post




Have an idea or two. take the pineapple out after 48 hours, for the love of all things holy. You can then add some orange or/and grapefrute zest that will add some cool layers. Squeeze the oils out of the skin first.

Ok. Egg white first in case you leave a shell in the tin you can throw it out without wasting the booze. Or you can stick your finger in there and it is eaiser to get the shard out than if you have the gin in it, or Pisco. Lemon would be my choice to give it structure. Then some Simple, about as much as usual as the pineapple and the Campari balance eachother out. Then you need a platform, Orange craracao would work, so would Cacao...if you are feeling randy. I would add a bit of Regan's bitters on top to compliment the whole thing.

ok, how about a Manhattan with the infused potable bitters as a rinse. West Coast, I know, but might be interesting.



Toby

Edited by Alchemist, 28 August 2008 - 04:18 AM.




A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#89 nikkib

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Posted 05 September 2008 - 08:27 AM

http://www.independe...ivo-856031.html

this is definitely my favourite campari drink at the moment....
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#90 haresfur

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 06:06 PM

My latest Campari sacrilege:

1 Campari
2 Tawney Port
2 dashes Fee's Orange Bitters
Orange twist to garnish

Mix Campari and port over ice, add bitters and garnish.

I figured "way bitter" and "way sweet" ought to work together. The orange bitters really make the difference to me. I tried Regan's orange bitters and they didn't seem quite right.
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