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Dissing Italy on The French Board

Italian

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38 replies to this topic

#31 MobyP

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 02:44 AM

"English cuisine" is known as a contradiction in terms.


Should I report this to the UK forum as you reported the French thread here in the Italian corner of egullet?

The true tragedy is that they'd probably agree with you. They'd be wrong, but they'd still agree with you.

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As an Englishman, I'd like to point out that I disagree with myself at least half the time, with Adam Balic almost never, and with Bux almost always.

Italian epiphany: a small roadside truckstop in the mountains outside Parma - La Mama in the kitchen hand rolling each batch of tortelli as we ordered them - a bliss unlike any other.

French Epiphany: A dish of morels plucked out of the ground that morning, sautéed in foie gras fat - a bliss unlike any other.

Edited by MobyP, 19 March 2005 - 02:56 AM.

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#32 fiftydollars

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 03:14 AM

This argument is just plain ridiculous... everybody knows Mexican food is the world's undisputed king of all cuisines.

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nah the world cusine is chinese
more people on the world eating it chinese then any other cusine :wink:
followed closely by indian. hahaha

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In the US, Mexican food is rapidly gaining ground on Chinese food and I would argue that it is already far ahead of Indian cuisine by almost any conceivable objective measure. To quote a now popular saying, "Rabbits are now reproducing like Mexican restaurants."

So as you can see, through my clearly relevant example, quote, and rigorous application of logic, that the spread of Mexican food dominance worldwide is an inevitability.

Many people in the Guangdong Province of China, to quote a pertinent example from my research, are not eating Mexican food more regularly because they lack an available market for tacos, tortillas, et al. Perhaps most tragically, many of China's people remain unaware of their strong predilection for Mexican food. It's really very sad, but luckily, as I argued earlier, no human border is impermeable to Mexicans, or our food.

...it's coming.

Edited by fiftydollars, 19 March 2005 - 04:58 PM.


#33 Pan

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 03:23 AM

In the US, Mexican food is rapidly gaining ground on Chinese food and I would argue that it is already far ahead of Indian cuisine by almost any conceivable objective measure. To quote a now popular saying, "Rabbits are now reproducing like Mexican restaurants."

So as you can see, through my clearly relevant example, quote, and rigorous application of logic, that the spread of Mexican food dominance worldwide is an inevitability.[...]

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Of course. Anything that succeeds in the US is bound to take over the entire world. :raz:

#34 origamicrane

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 03:28 AM

OK as a non european i think i might be able to arbitrate a bit :wink:

just to qualify myself I am a british born Chinese who like all of us here is a little food obsessed i have been to France and Italy several times and cook french and italian food amongst other things.

So here are my perceptions as a brit.

I said in the French forum, I feel that French food has an air of snobbery about it. Italian food doesn't have this feel, instead italian food i feel has a spontaneous passion instead.

The main reason for this is that French food always seems to be served in a formal environment where as italian food is for a gathering of friends and family.

Yes i know there is formal and informal dishes in both cusines but its the image that has been exported to other countries that is what drives global perceptions of their cusine.
"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

#35 fiftydollars

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 05:45 PM

In the US, Mexican food is rapidly gaining ground on Chinese food and I would argue that it is already far ahead of Indian cuisine by almost any conceivable objective measure. To quote a now popular saying, "Rabbits are now reproducing like Mexican restaurants."

So as you can see, through my clearly relevant example, quote, and rigorous application of logic, that the spread of Mexican food dominance worldwide is an inevitability.[...]

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Of course. Anything that succeeds in the US is bound to take over the entire world. :raz:

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Quite naturally...

...and we are very glad that you see our side of things. It will facilitate assimilation.

Your code name is Pan Dulce.

#36 albiston

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 06:55 AM

Please note: the discussion on cookbooks introducing to Italian cooking has been split to a new topic.
Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.

#37 Bill Klapp

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 04:43 AM

Bravo, cinghiale, for dredging up the debate of a few years ago! It was my first foray on eGullet, and the absurdity of a guy who is allergic to pasta (?????) coming on the Italy board for the express purpose of trashing Italian food was more than I could stand.
Bill Klapp

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#38 bleudauvergne

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 06:14 AM

My first epiphany was Chinese. Over mustard greens.

#39 Bux

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 10:40 AM


But Adam, you don't even qualify as a local, nor does FaustianBargain unless I'm mistaken. What does it say about perception if the local food is best appreciated by expats and visiting students? This thread will quickly take on an international general flavor in spite of Busboy's best attempts to start a local food fight between EU neighbors. (Okay, against my resolutions not to rely on smilies, consider one inserted here.)

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Does 'indefinate leave to stay' count?

I get the impression with British food that like an iceberg it is present and powerful, but the interesting bits are mostly unseen.

A good place to start maybe this book. British Food

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I don't know about indefinite leave. In the UK? In Scotland specifically? I know. In Maine, (the northeastern most state in the US, it's something your grandson could use to defend himself against the charge he's not from around here. It is however not so unusual to think of people who weren't born in the same house as their grandfather as "summer people." Scots, I gather, are not so clannish.

I know less about icebergs than I do about food. I always thought the part of an iceberg you couldn't see was the scarey part. That might make it analagous to food.

All this talk of epiphany is revealing. I suppose a good case could be made for the subjectivity of taste. Perhaps we're blessed by not having members interested in doing so. "Spain" is the answer and all the more strongly so precisely because it's not been mentioned and in spite of the fact that I've forgotten the real point of the topic.
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