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Chocolate Fondant

Chocolate Dessert

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33 replies to this topic

#1 Lowblow

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 08:31 PM

Very Sorry, just realised this should be in the Pastry section, please forgive me

I was looking through all my recipe card's and disks yesterday and I have lost my Chocolat Fondant recipe. If any of you have a good recipe for these could you let me have it please. I would also love to hear anybodys thoughts or ideas on these sexy little things oooohhh I like them sooooo very much.

PS Im on about the things that look like little chocolate sponge cakes that have a soft saucy centre hmmm yum.

Yours Lowblow

Edited by Lowblow, 15 March 2005 - 08:35 PM.


#2 Patrick S

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Posted 31 March 2005 - 08:12 AM

Here are a couple of recipes. Let us know if you try either of them.

Chocolate Fondant

Gianduja Chocolate Fondant
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#3 culinary bear

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Posted 31 March 2005 - 03:23 PM

If you like, I can give you the recipe for the fondants I make in the pastry kitchen at work; it's a pretty foolproof recipe, and gives excellent results.
Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."

#4 aidensnd

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 01:08 AM

How do you make these for service if you don't have the time to bake them to order?

#5 joeyk2k

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 01:20 AM

How do you make these for service if you don't have the time to bake them to order?

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You can't really! Should be able to bake them to order make them small and they only take about 10 mins. Make sure you butter and flour the moulds well though or use non-stick.

#6 jackal10

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 01:44 AM

I use Heston Blumenthal's recipe: http://www.ukgourmet...hocfondant.html

It differs form the normal by using only egg white, not yolk, which gives a cleaner, deeper flavour.
Very versatile; can double for molten chocolate cake, and if you whip the white can also be used mousse, flourless sponge, roulade etc.

#7 maremosso

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 03:16 AM

I use Heston Blumenthal's recipe: http://www.ukgourmet...hocfondant.html

It differs form the normal by using only egg white, not yolk, which gives a cleaner, deeper flavour.
Very versatile; can double for molten chocolate cake, and if you whip the white can also be used mousse, flourless sponge, roulade etc.

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I checked out the Heston Blumenthal's fondant recipe, which is part of a larger dessert.

What on earth is sweetcorn powder, any easy-to-find substitutes one can use instead?

#8 culinary bear

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 10:51 AM

For what it's worth...

520g couverture
520g butter
12 eggs
4 yolks
360g sugar
15g baking powder
320g soft flour

Butter some 200ml foil pudding moulds and dust with cocoa.
Melt butter with chocolate over a bain-marie.
Whisk eggs with sugar to ribbon stage.
Sift baking powder and flour together.
Combine egg mix and chocolate mix, fold flour/bp through.

Pipe into moulds - three-quaters filling them - and refrigerate.

180C oven, 9 minutes, rest for 2 minutes in moulds and turn out.

Makes around 18.

Edited by culinary bear, 01 April 2005 - 11:26 AM.

Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."

#9 Patrick S

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 10:53 AM

Thanks for the recipe, Allan.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#10 aidensnd

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Posted 01 April 2005 - 05:10 PM

I use Heston Blumenthal's recipe: http://www.ukgourmet...hocfondant.html

It differs form the normal by using only egg white, not yolk, which gives a cleaner, deeper flavour.
Very versatile; can double for molten chocolate cake, and if you whip the white can also be used mousse, flourless sponge, roulade etc.

View Post



How long do you whip everything for, the recipe just says 'thoroughly'?
How long can you store them in the fridge before baking?

Thanks

#11 maremosso

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Posted 02 April 2005 - 02:52 AM

For what it's worth...

520g couverture
520g butter
12 eggs
4 yolks
360g sugar
15g baking powder
320g soft flour

Butter some 200ml ...

Makes around 18.

View Post



Thank you for posting this, culinary bear.
I have been making moelleux for years, but I have had trouble finding a recipe that serves more than 8 - and it doesn't double or triple well. I am going to use these measurements for an upcoming dinner party - would the 18 servings be of 200ml each?
If that is the case then I could perhaps stretch the recipe to serve my 26 dinner guests, as I plan to add strawberry sorbet on the side (in this hot country it will become a coulis in the bat of an eye!) , and anise tuiles.

#12 culinary bear

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Posted 02 April 2005 - 06:58 AM

approximately, yes... and as they're so rich, you could probably underfill by quite a bit and still have a satisfying portion...
Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."

#13 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:11 PM

How on earth do yo make this stuff workable???
I need to make drapes with it and I have no idea how to get it from totally disagreeable to workable.
Any hints tips suggestions really truely hugely appreciated !!!!!!!!!
THANKS!!!!

Oh ya I used the Cake Bible recipe...........hmmmmmmmmmmm

Edited by TraciiTVCL, 06 April 2007 - 08:17 PM.


#14 K8memphis

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:15 PM

Define totally disagreeable.

If it's dry add some shortening.

If it's hard to knead, microzap it in 5 second increments. Watch it though, don't nuke it.

#15 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:19 PM

I might define it as dry not crumbly, definitely not like regular fondant.
I added shortening, did nothing.
What does zapping it do?

Edited by TraciiTVCL, 06 April 2007 - 08:20 PM.


#16 K8memphis

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:22 PM

Warms it up so it's pliable. Like loosens it up. Try a tid tad.
I mean just a bit of the fondant, not all of it, to see if it helps.

Edited by K8memphis, 06 April 2007 - 08:23 PM.


#17 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:24 PM

........going to try...........

#18 K8memphis

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:25 PM

I mean it might need more shortening too. Umm, I guess my kid has my Berenbaum book. Was gonna check your formula...

#19 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:29 PM

ok the tiny piece is a little more workable. I added MUCH shortening.
Dang this is not going to be fun making drapes and dressmakers bows!!!!!!!!!!!

THANKS

#20 K8memphis

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:34 PM

Well didja zap it at all???

Shortening might make it too soft.

The microzapping is nice because it gives you momentary pliability. Then when it goes back to room temp it gets firmer.

Drapes are easier to do out of a combination of gum paste plus fondant. Umm, if it was moi, I add cornstarch to fondant to get dress bows.

Hope all goes well, Cake-buddy!

#21 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:39 PM

I am going to zap and work small pieces at a time. Afraid of the big stuff, LOL.
And did I mantion the cake is just buttercream.........HA HA HA HA HA HA HA
I'm just going to add a small amount of gumtrag to what I will be making into the bows.

#22 K8memphis

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:45 PM

Cool. Sounds like you have it under control.
I'm shuffling off to bed...Hope all goes well.

#23 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 09:02 PM

Under control.............HA HA HA HA HA HA HA :wacko:

#24 MightyD

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 11:47 AM

i use the chocolate fondant from the Cake Bible as well and i've never had issues with it. did you let it rest overnight to allow the moisture to distribute?

i usually zap the whole thing in the microwave, as K8 mentioned above, then plop it in a shortening-greased bowl and knead until smooth. if it's sticky, i just add a touch more shortening. makes it very pliable and easy to work with.

#25 TurtleMeng

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 02:53 PM

I had never made fondant. Then I made 2 batches....

They both tasted great, but the cracking, man.

I have looked thru internet over and over. I own the Rose Cake Bible and the second one is from her recipe. I will list the ingredients below

1 T gelatin
1/3 c water
2/3 c corn syrup
1 T glycerine
1/4 c shortening
1 t vanilla
1 lb 9 oz powdered sugar
7 oz cocoa

I will not list the method since if you are helping me you would know...I think the problem with this recipe is too much cocoa. 7 oz was an enormous amount (more than 2 cups). So the fondant would try to crack no matter how much I kneaded and tried to rub in extra shortening/glycerine.

The first recipe I made was a simple white fondant with 2 oz melted chocolate mixed in. Even this did not crack as badly as Rose's recipe. Everyone sings praise of her recipe but I have found many recipes in her book to have a problem.

Can anyone help?
"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"

#26 TurtleMeng

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 07:38 PM

No reply? Am I the only one trying to make fondant?......
"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"

#27 minas6907

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 08:00 PM

No, many of us make fondant. Out of curiosity, what is the process for the first recipe you posted? I dont think its safe to say that if we could help we would know the process, because theres a few ingredients that seem sort extra. I've never made fondant with gelatine, so I am sort of suspect of the recipe. Do you have to agitate it? Knowing the process is helpful.

Also, from your own comments, I would personally forget the first recipe if it doesnt produce anything worth keeping. Stick on tweaking the second one that had less cracking (can we see that recipe?) Do you have any pictures we could take a look at? How is it cracking? Are you depositing it in starch/silicone molds?

Its unfortunate, but you'd be surprised at how many flawed recipes are printed in reputable books.

#28 minas6907

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 08:17 PM

My apologies, I had in mind that you were making the fondant for candies, but I'm realizing now that its probably for a cake. Anywho, I'd still like to see a pic if you got one.

#29 TurtleMeng

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 12:00 PM

Thanks. I am making cake fondant. It goes like

bloom the gelatin in water, then heat to dissolve, then add glycerine, shortening, corn syrup, vanilla. Pour the mixture into sifted powdered sugar/cocoa and knead until elastic. Let it rest o/n.

Most fondant recipes I have seen for cake have the gelatin. Most main ingredients are the same. I think it might be the ratio....
"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"

#30 cookingofjoy

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 07:04 PM

I've not tried Rose's. I have used Toba Garret's fondant, with adding 2-5TB cocoa to 8oz fondant. Her recipe also recommends adding shortening, after adding the cocoa, to smooth it out. Was it still crumbly the day after? It might help to try kneading in a little water and letting it sit a bit, too. I think Toba's recipe is helpful in that it's a guide for how much cocoa to add, kind of like with the powdered sugar, add as much as needed.

The chocolate fondant recipe I've used most is from Michelle Foster on cake central. And I've mostly used white chocolate (actual white chocolate, not choc chips or baking chips).
1/2 cup cream
3 Tbsp. unflavored gelatin
1 cup corn syrup
3 Tbsp. butter
3 Tbsp. glycerin
2 tsp. clear vanilla
dash salt
Approximately 3 1/2 lbs. powdered sugar
6 oz chocolate





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