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Fried Chicken--Cook-Off 5

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#31 patti

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Posted 13 March 2005 - 08:41 PM

Well then, kind sir, please post your recipe!!!!

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See post 13 in this thread. Marlene posted Mayhaw Man's recipe under "Dorothy's Chicken."
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#32 Jake

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Posted 13 March 2005 - 09:04 PM

Well then, kind sir, please post your recipe!!!!

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See post 13 in this thread. Marlene posted Mayhaw Man's recipe under "Dorothy's Chicken."

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Indeed she did, thank you kindly patti. Perhaps next time I'll remember to read the thread again instead of just typing with a glass of wine by my side. Oops. Sorry. :huh: :blush:

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#33 MarketStEl

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Posted 13 March 2005 - 09:12 PM

I see I'm joining the party late, but I'm definitely game.

My local Acme had a special on Perdue "Oven Stuffer" roasters, but I may just cut up this bird instead so I can get to fryin' soon. (Besides, it's quicker than roasting.)

Though I'm a native Midwesterner, and thus can consider fried chicken a "native" dish, I've lived in the land of effete Eastern snobbery for too long to have my stuff considered "authentic," I'm afraid. Not to mention that I've had Popeye's imprinted on my taste buds and often try to approximate their spicy recipe.

I'm a shallow-fryer myself and double-dip my chicken: beaten egg, flour mixture, beaten egg again, flour mixture again. This produces a crust that's just about as crunchy as a good batter-dipped deep-fried chicken.

I'll let you know what seasonings went into the flour after I've prepared my next batch.
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#34 snowangel

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Posted 13 March 2005 - 09:21 PM

So, I have questions and comments:

Baking powder and ice water. Versus buttermilk. Some scientist, please explain! Then, I go to my new Gourmet cookbook, which recommends sprinking the cut up chicken with 1/2 cup of kosher salt (draws the water out, making for less splattering, and tenderizes) for 1 hour before risning and "marinating" said rinsed chicken in buttermilk and onion.

The rest of the recipe is pretty much in accordance with what many sources say. Coat in enhanced flour, let set, and fry.

Now, I did find the recipe in the file from my great grandmother. Amost unreadable, due to the splotches, stains, and that wondfully intriguing spidery handwritting.

"Soak one cut up fresh fryer in buttermilk (and, I'm sure by fresh, she meant one she'd chased around and de-headed herself, and the buttermilk would have been from Her Farm). Keep in the ice box until ready. Mix flour with s & p. Fry in 1/2 crisco and 1/2 bacon grease in the cast iron skillet until done.

When my grandmother, her daughter, cleaned out her house, I said to my sister, casually, sure, you can have the cast iron skillet.

Silly me.
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#35 helenjp

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Posted 13 March 2005 - 09:34 PM

I said to my sister, casually, sure, you can have the cast iron skillet


Heh heh. When my mother cleaned out her kitchen, she said, casually, "You can have one of those cast iron frying pans if you want". "Sure," I said, and grabbed the best one, before she had even a second to rephrase her offer. :smile:

#36 Akiko

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 06:00 AM

There are so many different and delicious ways to do fried chicken! One of my favorite things to eat.

I did one last week Chinese style. Gently poach a whole chicken in water with aromatics. Mine was asian style so I added - Shao Hsing, green onions, garlic, and ginger.

Air dry overnight in the refrigerator (or even two nights). This step is very necessary for crisp skin.

Cut chicken in half up the breastbone and backbone. Deep fry breast side down in very hot oil (I used peanut). Turn over once the breast side is golden and fry the other side.

this is delicious sprinkled with szechuan peppercorn salt and some cilantro.

#37 My Confusing Horoscope

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 08:18 AM

We were planning on yardbird this week, Prudhomme Family Cookbook recipe!

One time at the start of a staff meeting at work we were all chit chatting and somebody said they didn't like fried chicken. I surprised even myself, and the whole staff, with my emphatic, immediate reply "You don't like fried chicken?????? Well THAT IS COMMUNIST!"

Edited by My Confusing Horoscope, 14 March 2005 - 08:44 AM.

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#38 NulloModo

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 10:53 AM

I'll probably get kicked off of this thread, but I'm going to fry it two ways. One batch will be chicken tenders for my son, and the other will  be naked chicken for me (skin on, but no batter), and none for my husband, who is the only person I know who doesn't enjoy fried chicken. I really, really, really love fried chicken, but I need to low carb it, which I'm sure will offend, irritate, piss off, and aggravate some posters, but that's what I'm gonna do.

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I will get in with you on this one too. Thankfully there are lots of LC fried chicken breading alternatives. I've done the pork rind crust, parm crust, naked fried, and recently started playing around with making batters from LC flours. Maybe I can do a little of each just to come up with a clear winner.
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#39 fifi

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 10:57 AM

Just to throw in another approach for Southern US style, I checked James Villas' recipe against my Aunt Minnie's. Actually, the one I checked was his mother's recipe in My Mother's Southern Kitchen.

It was pretty much Aunt Minnie's as to quantities but there were some departures. No Tabasco, no leavening in the flour mix, and the chicken gets a dip in milk before flouring instead of the longer soak in buttermilk. The paper bags are there, as are the frying temperatures.

Having started into "research mode" I thought I would see what we have said here in the past. I found this interesting thread over in Southern Food Culture.

I am sure that all of these approaches differ in the details. For those that are making the "traditional Southern style," it will be pretty interesting to see how the variables work out.

But I certainly hope that all of this talk of Southern style doesn't discourage the sharing of various other techniques for baptizing a bird in fat. :biggrin:

edit to add: How could I forget this article, Robb Walsh's discussion of the subject with none other than John T. Edge.

Edited by fifi, 14 March 2005 - 11:03 AM.

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#40 Susan in FL

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 11:07 AM

Oh, good! I can join in this time because I meet the qualifications to do this one.

but rarely have made

I am stretching that a bit. I made it a few times back in my previous life (first marriage), but it's been years and years, so I'll call that rarely. My then-mother-in-law bought me a cast-iron skillet and taught me how to make fried chicken in it immediatly after I married her son. She used bacon grease -- I sometimes did, and sometimes used peanut oil, and sometimes both -- and flour with "special seasonings."

...and the other will be naked chicken for me (skin on, but no batter), and none for my husband ...I really, really, really love fried chicken, but I need to low carb it, which I'm sure will offend, irritate, piss off, and aggravate some posters, but that's what I'm gonna do.

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No offense or any negativity taken here! Russ pan-fries his chicken thighs that way. I love them. I could eat them every week and request them often. :wub:
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#41 ldubois2

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 11:49 AM

I'm in on this one, too. Born in Greenville, Mississippi and while its been a while, I have fried some chicken before. But it'll have to be Tuesday.

We used the brown paper bags on the front end to coat with flour and seasonings (paprika, garlic powder, salt, pepper) and on the back end to remove as much oil as possible.

I remember adding bacon grease (which every good southern cook would have for this purpose or seasoning green beans) darkens the chicken a bit along with flavor.

[Looked at Ma Dip's Kitchen recipe for fun (Durham, NC restaurant of some repute). She brines the chicken for 20 minutes, coats with flour and pepper and fries in shortening (350 degrees) fries for a total of 20 minutes.]

Slightly off subject.....gravy? Can we actually make this without milk gravy?

#42 eunny jang

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 11:57 AM

We've been frying a lot of chicken lately - I marinate in buttermilk and Tabasco, shake with flour and baking powder, and pan-fry with Crisco and bacon grease.

It is absolutely delicious - shattering-crisp crust, juicy meat, even when consumed the next day, standing in front of the fridge.

My only problem's been finding chickens small enough to cook the insides before the crust burns - thighs from even a 3.5 lb bird skate on the outer edge of the balancing act.

#43 Toliver

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 01:14 PM

Anyone add onions to their oil? Is that a Southern thing?
I saw an episode of "Tyler's Ultimate" where he was in a restaurant kitchen in Oxford, Mississippi, where they were making fried chicken. The women doing the frying (using the biggest fry skillet I have ever seen) tossed hunks of onion into the oil before they started frying the chicken. You can click on the link to "Chalfonte Fried Chicken" for the recipe where the onion gets dropped into the oil.

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#44 fifi

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 01:52 PM

We've been frying a lot of chicken lately - I marinate in buttermilk and Tabasco, shake with flour and baking powder, and pan-fry with Crisco and bacon grease.

It is absolutely delicious - shattering-crisp crust, juicy meat, even when consumed the next day, standing in front of the fridge.

My only problem's been finding chickens small enough to cook the insides before the crust burns - thighs from even a 3.5 lb bird skate on the outer edge of the balancing act.

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You are absolutely right. I agree that 3 1/2 pounds is the limit, and that is if you save the breasts for something else or hack them in half. As I posted above, packages of chicken pieces here look like they come from at least 4 pounders. I haven't seen a whole chicken at less than 3 1/2 pounds in a long time.


Anyone add onions to their oil?  Is that a Southern thing?
I saw an episode of "Tyler's Ultimate" where he was in a restaurant kitchen in Oxford, Mississippi, where they were making fried chicken.  The women doing the frying (using the biggest fry skillet I have ever seen) tossed hunks of onion into the oil before they started frying the chicken.  You can click on the link to "Chalfonte Fried Chicken" for the recipe where the onion gets dropped into the oil.

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Now that you mention it, I remember that episode. I thought the addition of the onions was really odd. I had never seen it, for whatever that is worth. I wonder if that is a micro-regional thing, sort of like poaching eggs in gumbo? Do you remember if they ate the onion?

Milk gravy . . . Definitely. I think my technique for that could use some work. As I remember, if Aunt Minnie was frying a couple of chickens, she would use two frying pans so that the "crumbs" didn't overbrown with the cooking of the second batch. Then she made the most sublime milk gravy. I never perfected that. Mine is ok, just not as heavenly as I remember.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

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#45 Toliver

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 02:35 PM

Anyone add onions to their oil?  Is that a Southern thing?
I saw an episode of "Tyler's Ultimate" where he was in a restaurant kitchen in Oxford, Mississippi, where they were making fried chicken.  The women doing the frying (using the biggest fry skillet I have ever seen) tossed hunks of onion into the oil before they started frying the chicken.  You can click on the link to "Chalfonte Fried Chicken" for the recipe where the onion gets dropped into the oil.

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Now that you mention it, I remember that episode. I thought the addition of the onions was really odd. I had never seen it, for whatever that is worth. I wonder if that is a micro-regional thing, sort of like poaching eggs in gumbo? Do you remember if they ate the onion?

Milk gravy . . . Definitely. I think my technique for that could use some work. As I remember, if Aunt Minnie was frying a couple of chickens, she would use two frying pans so that the "crumbs" didn't overbrown with the cooking of the second batch. Then she made the most sublime milk gravy. I never perfected that. Mine is ok, just not as heavenly as I remember.

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I wondered if the onion really added anything to the final product. It's gotta be there just for flavoring the oil. The Chinese season their oil before stir frying...why not do it with oil for frying chicken? And to answer your question, no, the onion was discarded. I am sure by the time the chicken is done cooking the onion is "toast" anyway, so to speak.
My milk gravy has always turned out disappointing. It usually tastes like "nothing".
If you have any tips or a recipe you can post, that would be great. Milk Gravy was never really covered in any of the eGCI classes.

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#46 eunny jang

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 02:47 PM

My milk gravy has always turned out disappointing. It usually tastes like "nothing".
If you have any tips or a recipe you can post, that would be great. Milk Gravy was never really covered in any of the eGCI classes.


Me too, please. My milk gravy is usually bits of salty stuff bobbing about in a sea of unappetizingly grey milk. I keep trying, but it's never anything anyone can eat. Bear in mind I have absolutely zero first-hand experience with fried chicken outside my own kitchen - the phrase "real fried chicken" carries enough mystique that I'm willing to buy that milk gravy is something one must learn from one's grandmother.

#47 Marlene

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 02:53 PM

Is milk gravy the same thing as cream gravy? The following is the recipe Brooks gave me when I made his fried chicken. I tried this and it worked wonderfully!

Better than your Grandma’s Creamed Gravy

Pour all but a little bit of grease out of the skillet. Add the leftover seasoned flour and brown slightly, Stir in a good bit of chicken stock and combine with the four mixture, using a whisk and making sure that you get all of the lumps out. Finish by adding some canned evaporated milk. Season with salt and pepper to taste (it won’t take much if you used good stock). Serve over rice.
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#48 zilla369

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:18 PM

any recipes that don't use buttermilk? There is no buttermilk in Japan. :sad:

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Kris and others: it's easy to create a substitute "buttermilk" by placing one tablespoon of lemon juice or distilled white vinegar in a measuring cup and adding enough whole milk to make one cup. Let it stand for 10 minutes in the fridge before using. Not tasty enough to drink, but plenty good enough for fried chicken marinade. I prefer the lemon juice version.

I'm so curious...why no buttermilk in Japan?
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#49 fifi

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:25 PM

. . . . .
. . . I'm willing to buy that milk gravy is something one must learn from one's grandmother.

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Apparantly that is the case. I have just gone through about 25 books that should have some info. That includes Villas, some Southern Junior League type collections, Cooks Illustrated tomes . . . No luck at all. That is just freakin' weird. The only reference I found was in a Texas collection coffee table style book. It doesn't start with the "drippings" but maybe the proportions will help. It starts with 3/4 cups fat, 1/2 cup flour, 2 cups milk.


Is milk gravy the same thing as cream gravy?  The following is the recipe Brooks gave me when I made his fried chicken.  I tried this and it worked wonderfully!

Better than your Grandma’s Creamed Gravy

Pour all but a little bit of grease out of the skillet. Add the leftover seasoned flour and brown slightly, Stir in a good bit of chicken stock and combine with the four mixture, using a whisk and making sure that you get all of the lumps out. Finish by adding some canned evaporated milk. Season with salt and pepper to taste (it won’t take much if you used good stock). Serve over rice.

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That seems pretty close to what Aunt Minnie did. I think she just used milk, though as she usually didn't have chicken stock around at the same time. Chicken stock was always made specifically for a dish like chicken and dumplings. She wasn't into freezers yet.

(Is that supposed to be a link?)
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#50 Marlene

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:29 PM

Sorry fifi. Is what supposed to be a link?
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#51 fifi

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:36 PM

 
. . . . .
Brooks' Chicken

Dorothy’s Fried Chicken
. . . . .

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There wer these earlier that I just noticed.


. . . . .
Better than your Grandma’s Creamed Gravy
. . . . .

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Then this one. They aren't showing up as links on my screen.
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#52 Marlene

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:37 PM

no, they aren't supposed to be links.i've posted the whole recipe.
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#53 artisan02

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:39 PM

So get our your cast iron skillets or deep fryers, digital cameras, grease splatter screens, a bird or two, flour, buttermilk, and way, way more fat, grease, and/or oil than you should consume in a month -- and start fryin'!

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I will more than likely be joining this one, as I need to relearn how to make the fried chicken I grew up eating in Richmond, VA.

I made it so many times under my mother's tutelage, and now, that I am 40 or more years past that time, I have lost the way to making good fried chicken.

She always pan fried it, and only did the dredging in flour with salt and pepper added. I seem to remember her using a lid on the pan at some point.

So, my method will more than likely be pan frying, and I will do it til I get it right again. :wink:

#54 fifi

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:47 PM

no, they aren't supposed to be links.i've posted the whole recipe.

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Oh . . . Duh!

I just checked with my sister. She doesn't remember getting instructions or recipes from Aunt Minnie, Grandma or our mother. We just recalls that they added the seasoned flour from the paper sack to the more or less drained pan and added milk until it "looked right." :hmmm: She has the same experience as I do. Sometimes it is pretty good, and we don't know why. More often it is just ok. We are now suspecting that this was a ploy to keep the descendants humble.
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#55 artisan02

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:47 PM

There's no better inspiration for cleaning up a cast-iron frying pan than fried chicken! Scour that pan. Have it sand-blasted if necessary! Season it well and enjoy it for years to come. I believe that it was Andiesenji who told us about inheriting a cast-iron pan from her grandmother, who in turn inherited it from her grandmother. A rusty old pan turns into an heirloom when treated with respect.  :smile:

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I am kicking myself right now, cause when I put a lot of my kitchen stuff into storage to become a traveling nurse, I packed up my wonderful cast iron skillet. It had a wonderful patina on it, but it wasn't something I was going to use that much in traveling and I had to only bring the things I would be using a lot. Most pans have to do double duty, even triple duty.

So since I don't have a cast iron skillet with me, I have to figure out which pan will work best for this. I do have a Le Crueset buffet pan and All-Clad saute pans with me, so guess one of those will have to do.

#56 Jake

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:49 PM

Fried chicken tonight it is. I will be using Brooks' recipe and hoping for the best -- I have faith, the gumbo recipe was awesome. However, I have only attempted pan fried chicken twice before, both times as a teenager, early twenties a number of years ago. Both experiences were horiffic....trust me. Just in case, I'll be serving the chicken with black-eyed peas, greans and sweet potato biscuits. I shall report back, providing I don't burn the house down. :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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#57 Chris Amirault

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:53 PM

Holy cow. This is going great gangbusters! I'm glad that there's a lot of action, since I'm about to go on a brief eGullet hiatus while Andrea brings our daughter Bebe into the world of oral (as opposed to umbilical) pleasures. Induction's set for Thursday, so it might be a week before you hear from me.

I'm wonderin' whether crispy fried chicken skin is a good supplement to breast milk for a newborn...!
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#58 torakris

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:54 PM

any recipes that don't use buttermilk? There is no buttermilk in Japan. :sad:

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Kris and others: it's easy to create a substitute "buttermilk" by placing one tablespoon of lemon juice or distilled white vinegar in a measuring cup and adding enough whole milk to make one cup. Let it stand for 10 minutes in the fridge before using. Not tasty enough to drink, but plenty good enough for fried chicken marinade. I prefer the lemon juice version.

I'm so curious...why no buttermilk in Japan?

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proabably because the Japanese traditonally were not big consumers of dairy and it never played a part in their traditonal diet, even today they don't really bake or make the kind of things that buttermilk is used in....
I don't think I have yet met a Japanese person who has even heard of buttermilk, and of course it isn't exactly something that can be easily imported. :sad:
So I make do without, I do the milk and lemon juice thing and find it works for most baked goods but you just can't use it for salad dressings, soups, etc

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#59 SobaAddict70

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:56 PM

Don't forget to include a discussion of that temple to fried chicken, Stroud's. :raz:

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#60 Marlene

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:56 PM

Mine is set for tomorrow night or Thursday night I think. Jake, when using Brooks recipe I'm going to sprinkle the spices right onto the chicken a la Dave's method instead of mixing them with the flour. I found when I did it the other way with Brooks chicken, the spices didn't come through the way I'd hoped.
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