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Ganache: Tips & Techniques


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#91 cocoa-lulu

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 03:02 PM

Thanks a lot! I did actually add too much liqueur this time. Also, I did add it rather fast. So I'll watch those things. I am intrigued by the adding liqueur to the cream method. Has anyone else tried it?

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That's the only way I do it. You don't want to add it too soon (don't want to evaporate the alcohol), but you can use it to speed the cooling of the cream. It's better for me to worry about two temps (cream/alcohol and chocolate) than three.

#92 jcho

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 04:02 PM

Did you premelt the chocolate? I've had much better success when I have melted chocolate prior to adding the cream/butter/flavorings.


Truffle Guy, I was happy to see that: I have been starting my ganache with melted tempered chocolate for some time now, with good results. I've been wondering whether I was alone in that, and whether it was considered a no-no.

#93 cocoa-lulu

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 07:54 AM

Did you premelt the chocolate? I've had much better success when I have melted chocolate prior to adding the cream/butter/flavorings.


Truffle Guy, I was happy to see that: I have been starting my ganache with melted tempered chocolate for some time now, with good results. I've been wondering whether I was alone in that, and whether it was considered a no-no.

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You're not alone, I started out using the 'hot cream to melt" method with o.k. results. Then the "cream to premelt", I would still get a grainy texture, every now and then. Now I add my cream to tempered chocolate in liquid state. I don't don't know if this is science or superstition. So, I'm guessing the tempered chocolate jump starts the proper crystallization. I've never had a grainy mixture since. The only adjustments I've made is to use a plastic bowl instead of metal for mixing. I found it a pain when the chocolate would start to set on the inside of the metal bowls.

#94 SweetSide

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 08:11 AM

For the chocolate experts out there -- I'm wondering if adding the hot cream to a tempered chocolate premelt works better because

1) The chocolate is already melted, so mixes in better with less agitation and all the little grains get melted (which sometimes doesn't happen if there isn't enough cream to hold the heat relative to the amount of chocolate

and more importantly

2) The chocolate is not at too high a temperature to cause the ganache to split or become grainy. By definition, chocolate in temper is not over 91 degrees...

Thoughts...
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#95 alanamoana

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:12 AM

your chocolate doesn't need to be in temper to make ganache, but i think it is best to have the cream and chocolate at around the same temperature. less "shock" for the chocolate to go through.

#96 SweetSide

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:36 AM

your chocolate doesn't need to be in temper to make ganache, but i think it is best to have the cream and chocolate at around the same temperature.  less "shock" for the chocolate to go through.

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Agreed about the the chocolate not having to be in temper -- I was just wondering if that happened to put the chocolate at a good temperature (upper 80F) that the cream didn't cool down too much melting the chocolate and that the chocolate wasn't too hot to cause it to overheat and have the cocoa butter separate out causing problems with the emulsion...

This would be along the lines of having the ingredients at the proper temperature for the emulsion to occur easily.
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#97 Aria

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 06:20 PM

Hey everyone,
I made some whipped white chocolate ganache balls and left them in a cool dry place ( room temp~69F) for 4 days. The chocolate to cream ratio was a bit different than I've used before, it was 3:1. Well, when I got them out to enrobe, they were very hard on the outside and when I tasted one of the balls, it had a crunchy, sugary coating. That coating could be tasted even after enrobing. Any help with the problem would be greatly appreciated!!

#98 tejon

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 06:41 PM

Not sure of how it happened, but does the crunchy, sugary coating add any interest to the finished truffles? I'd be tempted to call it a "feature" :wink:.
Kathy

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#99 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 06:52 PM

I find if ganache sits for a while that it does get rather crusty, however after a day or so enrobed in chocolate I think you will find the crunchiness will likely disappear.

#100 John DePaula

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 07:20 PM

1) 4 days is too long, I think. Usually, overnight will suffice.

2) Did you use any invert sugar (corn syrup, glucose, honey, etc.) in your ganache? This helps prevent sugar crystals from forming and also has a natural preservative effect.
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#101 Aria

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 10:32 AM

find if ganache sits for a while that it does get rather crusty, however after a day or so enrobed in chocolate I think you will find the crunchiness will likely disappear.

Thanks Kerry! I was wondering about the reason why the crunchiness will disappear. Will it for sure or only in some cases?

Also,

Did you use any invert sugar (corn syrup, glucose, honey, etc.) in your ganache? This helps prevent sugar crystals from forming and also has a natural preservative effect.

I've never used invert sugar because I've always wanted the truffles to be 'natural'. Is the taste different if you used invert sugar? Maybe I'll try using it next time.

Thanks so much everyone!

#102 John DePaula

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:00 PM

I've never used invert sugar because I've always wanted the truffles to be 'natural'. Is the taste different if you used invert sugar? Maybe I'll try using it next time.

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honey, corn syrup and glucose (which is just corn syrup with less water (there are wheat based versions, too, but I don't like the taste)) are natural, though you should verify that sulpher-dixoide isn't used as a preservative.

obviously, honey can impart a strong flavor so only use it when you want that in your end product.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#103 Aria

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 07:28 PM

Thank you so much John!

#104 John DePaula

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 11:33 PM

Thank you so much John!

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You're quite welcome. Glad to help.
John DePaula
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Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#105 John DePaula

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 12:47 PM

I would like to make an infusion for a ganache using fresh Pandan (Screwpine) leaves. The leaves are vibrant and fresh, but the scent of pandan is quite mild, almost undetectable, in fact.

Should I leave the pandan out to ripen and develop flavor, as you would for a banana?

To make the ganache, as I see it there are two possibilities:

1) Boil the cream, add the chopped leaves and steep like tea.

2) Dry the leaves in a slow oven or dehydrator, boil the cream and steep like tea.

Does anyone have some related experience?

Could you recommend the best method?

Thanks
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#106 Apicio

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 01:35 PM

Drying the pandan blades will make the flavour totally disappear. Your chance of extracting the most pandan flavour is by doing your #1. Snip them to thin pieces with a scissor so as to expose as much leaf cross-section as possible. This will allow more flavour to bleed into the hot cream.


Gato ming gato miao busca la vida para comer

#107 ScorchedPalate

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 01:53 PM

You probably already know this, but many Thai groceries sell pandan extract, in case you wanted to boost the flavor of your infusion.
Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

#108 John DePaula

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 02:05 PM

You probably already know this, but many Thai groceries sell pandan extract, in case you wanted to boost the flavor of your infusion.

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Yes, thanks. I've tried to find it locally but everyone has stopped carrying it. If anyone knows of an online source, I'd appreciate hearing about it.
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#109 John DePaula

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 02:06 PM

Drying the pandan blades will make the flavour totally disappear.  Your chance of extracting the most pandan flavour is by doing your #1. Snip them to thin pieces with a scissor so as to expose as much leaf cross-section as possible.  This will allow more flavour to bleed into the hot cream.

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Wow, I didn't know that about drying the leaves. Thanks!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#110 Apicio

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 02:45 PM

You probably already know this, but many Thai groceries sell pandan extract, in case you wanted to boost the flavor of your infusion.

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They do not have colourless pandan extract though. What they sell are invariably allied with the ugliest kelly green on the planet. Even worse are the ones blended with artificial coconut flavour. Natural infusion, if you can get hold of fresh blades, gives the best fragrance, in my experience. Also great for panna cotta and other congealed desserts.


Gato ming gato miao busca la vida para comer

#111 ScorchedPalate

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 04:40 PM

You probably already know this, but many Thai groceries sell pandan extract, in case you wanted to boost the flavor of your infusion.

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Yes, thanks. I've tried to find it locally but everyone has stopped carrying it. If anyone knows of an online source, I'd appreciate hearing about it.

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Here are three sources:
GourmetSleuth
Import Food
Wing Yip (UK)

Yes, they're all neon green :S

This indonesian paste looks a little less green... in fact, it's almost slate blue.


I found a recipe online that suggests:
100ml pandan juice (blend 6 pandan leaves with about 125ml water, strain)

Edited by ScorchedPalate, 18 April 2006 - 04:41 PM.

Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

#112 John DePaula

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 04:57 PM

You probably already know this, but many Thai groceries sell pandan extract, in case you wanted to boost the flavor of your infusion.

View Post



They do not have colourless pandan extract though. What they sell are invariably allied with the ugliest kelly green on the planet. Even worse are the ones blended with artificial coconut flavour. Natural infusion, if you can get hold of fresh blades, gives the best fragrance, in my experience. Also great for panna cotta and other congealed desserts.

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It looks like fresh will be the best alternative all the way around since I require an all natural product and it looks like the online sources have artificial ingredients.

Thanks for your help!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#113 John DePaula

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 04:59 PM

I found a recipe online that suggests:
    100ml pandan juice (blend 6 pandan leaves with about 125ml water, strain)

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I was wondering about the quantity and this gives me a place to start. Thanks a lot!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#114 trillium

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 05:32 PM

Don't rule out frozen leaves. Most SE Asian grocery stores will have them frozen, and some of the ones from Thailand have more flavor then the ones flown in from Hawaii.

regards,
trillium

#115 Tepee

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 09:30 PM

If you want the fragrance without the colour, scratch the fresh leaves with a fork before using them.
TPcal!
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#116 Renee K

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 03:00 AM

What I usually do when I make kaya (a rich pandan flavored coconut milk curd/jam) is to make tears along the length of the pandan leaves at different spots, stack a few of the leaves together and tie into a knot, then gently "pound" the knotted leaves with a pestle or anything heavy really... this really helps to release the aromas. Then just plop the knotted leaves into the coconut milk mixture and stir it with the milk till the curd is cooked and ready. And the jam carries a beautiful pandan fragrance without any added color.

Yeah, drying the leaves will kill the aromas, unfortunately.

#117 miladyinsanity

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 06:09 AM

What I usually do when I make kaya (a rich pandan flavored coconut milk curd/jam) is to make tears along the length of the pandan leaves at different spots, stack a few of the leaves together and tie into a knot, then gently "pound" the knotted leaves with a pestle or anything heavy really... this really helps to release the aromas. Then just plop the knotted leaves into the coconut milk mixture and stir it with the milk till the curd is cooked and ready.

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Pounding it a few times is pretty much the classic Asian way of releasing aromas from herbs, spices etc.
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#118 John DePaula

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 07:31 AM

What I usually do when I make kaya (a rich pandan flavored coconut milk curd/jam) is to make tears along the length of the pandan leaves at different spots, stack a few of the leaves together and tie into a knot, then gently "pound" the knotted leaves with a pestle or anything heavy really... this really helps to release the aromas. Then just plop the knotted leaves into the coconut milk mixture and stir it with the milk till the curd is cooked and ready. And the jam carries a beautiful pandan fragrance without any added color.

Yeah, drying the leaves will kill the aromas, unfortunately.

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Mmmm... that sounds delicious. Thanks for adding this technique. I will look for a recipe for kaya!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#119 miladyinsanity

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 08:16 AM

What I usually do when I make kaya (a rich pandan flavored coconut milk curd/jam) is to make tears along the length of the pandan leaves at different spots, stack a few of the leaves together and tie into a knot, then gently "pound" the knotted leaves with a pestle or anything heavy really... this really helps to release the aromas. Then just plop the knotted leaves into the coconut milk mixture and stir it with the milk till the curd is cooked and ready. And the jam carries a beautiful pandan fragrance without any added color.

Yeah, drying the leaves will kill the aromas, unfortunately.

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Mmmm... that sounds delicious. Thanks for adding this technique. I will look for a recipe for kaya!

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Oh no! I forgot. I told an eGulleter I'd get my mom's recipe, but I never did. :wacko:

Edited to add: She should be making it soon, so I can PM you if you want (she makes it in number of coconuts, not cans of coconut milk).

Edited by miladyinsanity, 19 April 2006 - 08:16 AM.

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#120 atcake

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:13 AM

I've only ever made ganache with heavy whipping cream. Is it possible to make ganache with heavy cream rather than heavy whipping cream? Is there any proportion difference?

(I bought the wrong cream and got heavy cream rather than heavy whipping cream)
TIA!



Nevermind...have my answer

Edited by atcake, 05 June 2006 - 03:19 AM.