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Ganache: Tips & Techniques


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#541 Jim D.

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 01:16 PM

After more research, I have decided to pack the chocolates in an air-tight container, place in a vacuum seal-able bag, then just seal it closed without using the vacuum function. It seems like the vacuum is too strong for any of my containers and I am unable to control the strength. My plan is to then refrigerate them for 24 hours, then freeze. When time to take them out, I will refrigerate for 24 hours, bring to room temp for 24 hours before opening them. Does this sound right? Thanks again!

I too have tried many methods of vacuum-freezing finished chocolates without a lot of success.  I use fairly sturdy boxes for my chocolates, and I thought I had succeeded once, but when I was preparing to give them away, I did a check, and the walls of one piece had collapsed.  There must be very rigid plastic containers out there somewhere, but I would assume the vacuum would be around the box, not inside it, so I'm not sure how protected the chocolates would be.  Right now I am placing the gift boxes filled with chocolates in a large plastic bag, sealing it (without using the vacuum feature), then refrigerating (no freezing).  Then I bring them to room temp with the bag still sealed (so that condensation will happen on the outside of the bag), then cut open the bag.  That way I can use the bag again.  Without freezing, I don't think this would work for long-term storage, but I think it helps extend shelf life for fillings that might be a little questionable otherwise.  My Weston vacuum sealer offers partial vacuuming, but it's an iffy proposition and depends on pushing the right button at just the right moment, so I've given up on that.  I think the method you describe above should be helpful, a good compromise.

 

Somewhere on this forum (I've just spent a long time searching, without success) there is a photo of a bag of individual chocolates (not in any container other than the freezer bag) that were vacuum-sealed, then frozen.  The person reported success with this method.  I think the vacuum would have to be fairly weak.



#542 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 01:58 PM

might have been me before I went to Silver City a few years back - bit of an issue with air pressure in the plane though.



#543 mrk

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 06:14 PM

I use Notter's technique (precoating on just one side).  There is disagreement about whether the precoat should be tempered or not.  I make sure it is not still in temper and find that it cuts more cleanly that way.  I don't think you notice this precoating layer at all once the ganache is dipped--it sort of disappears once the piece has been dipped.  I also have combined a passion fruit layer and a vanilla layer, and people seem to like the combination.

If I make 40 bonbon, how to calculate how much chocolate for each bonbon? in approximately how many (g) chocolate to enrobing for each bonbon? 



#544 Jim D.

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 07:26 AM

If I make 40 bonbon, how to calculate how much chocolate for each bonbon? in approximately how many (g) chocolate to enrobing for each bonbon? 

I think that is a very difficult calculation to make with any accuracy--depends on the size of the pieces, viscosity of the chocolate, etc.  I usually fill a frame that is 7.5" x 7.5".  That allows me to cut off 1/4" on each edge (because the edges are not usually completely flat).  So, with 1" pieces, I have 49 pieces total.  For that amount I put 1.5 lb. (680g) in my small tempering machine.  After dipping, there is approximately 25% remaining in the bowl (you need extra to be able to dip the final pieces).


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#545 Jim D.

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:40 PM

Ever since Tikidoc mentioned (on this forum) making a piña colada flavored ganache, I have been trying to come up with a recipe. I found one online and have been working with it (the author credits Peter Greweling for the recipe, but it is not in the Greweling book that I have--and I am suspicious as it calls for "white chocolate chips"). I am using white chocolate as a base and am aiming for a 2:1 ratio of chocolate to liquefiers (Greweling and Notter call for 2.5:1 for white chocolate, though many of their recipes do not adhere to this ratio). So here are the ingredients:

Chocolate:
340g white chocolate, melted
34g cocoa butter, melted

Liquefiers:
76g cream
90g pineapple purée
20g coconut rum

Other Ingredient:
84g coconut oil

Excluding the coconut oil from the calculations (as one does with butter in a regular cream ganache), the ratio is 2:1 (the cocoa butter is not in the original recipe, but I added it to bring the chocolate up to the amount needed without adding additional flavor). But when I finished the ganache and gave it time to firm up (this was a test), it started in a very liquid state but got very firm in a short time. So firm, in fact, that I was able to add more pineapple to get a better flavor, and it still was quite firm, probably more than one wants in a piped ganache.

Can anyone explain what might have occurred to make this ganache so firm? Did the coconut oil do something to the mixture? (it was liquid when I added it). The flavor, by the way, was great, and if I can add more pineapple and rum, that would be a bonus. But I'm wondering if this was a fluke. Any insights would be welcome.

Edited by Jim D., 06 June 2014 - 01:41 PM.


#546 Kerry Beal

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:16 PM

Could be the eutectic effect of the coconut oil on the cocoa butter (think of a melt away - totally liquid until you cool and temper it a bit).  



#547 Susanne Hindle Kher

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 12:03 PM

I've been reading up on theory behind all different ganache types (Greweling and Notter books), but I still am unsure as to the best way to take a ganache recipe that's meant to be piped and convert it to a recipe that can be slabbed. Is it as simple as adding more chocolate (in which case, does flavor suffer)?

 

Thanks for any thoughts (I'm working with both cream and butter ganache recipes)!!! ~Susie



#548 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 01:54 PM

As far as I can tell, the recipes are the same but the technique differs.  From what I've read in Greweling's book, for piped you pour the cream over unmelted chocolate, mix, leave to cool then agitate, and for slabbed you use melted, tempered chocolate and pour it directly into the frame.

 

However, there are people around here who know a lot more about this than I do...


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#549 Susanne Hindle Kher

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 02:44 PM

As far as I can tell, the recipes are the same but the technique differs.  From what I've read in Greweling's book, for piped you pour the cream over unmelted chocolate, mix, leave to cool then agitate, and for slabbed you use melted, tempered chocolate and pour it directly into the frame.

 

However, there are people around here who know a lot more about this than I do...

 

Wow, I'll have to explore that! Thanks!



#550 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:53 PM

I second having a read of Greweling - he goes into the differences in detail.  



#551 mrk

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 10:56 PM

Can I make ganache with milk instead of heavy cream ?

 

I wonder to know what is that different result?



#552 pastrygirl

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 11:14 PM

Yes.  You can make ganache with water.  The texture will be more chewy and less melty without the extra fat.  Also, use a little less milk than you would cream.  Or if you are simply out of cream and need to substitute, you could use milk and butter.



#553 mrk

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 07:11 PM

Thank you



#554 chocofoodie

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 12:48 PM

Hi all,

 

8 oz dark chocolate

4 ounces double cream

.5 ounce cocoa butter

.5 ounce butter

.5 ounce glucose syrup

small spoon vanilla 

 

Is this ganache to fatty? I feel like it's not setting up properly but I'm not sure if it's the proportions of the ganache or something else. Also it seems runny. Should I add more chocolate? I'm trying to make a filling to go in shell cups. So the ganache shows, I don't cover it.

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated :-)



#555 Darienne

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 02:13 PM

No answer from me, I'm afraid, but I'm always interested in reading about these sorts of problems.


Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#556 gfron1

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 03:43 PM

You're messing with my head being from the UK but using ounces! A very basic ganache like that is often just equal parts cream and chocolate...there are countless recipes however that are more or less of both. But 2:1 chocolate to cream seems like it should not only set up, but set up firm. I ran to Paul Young's book to see his basic and its 250g:250g and 150g muscovado. I've used that one before and its a firm ganache...almost firm enough to slab for dipping.  

 

Another common base for me is 500g chocolate, 250g cream, 150g butter.

 

So...are you waiting long enough for it to set up? Is your room too warm for it to set up? Throw a spoonful in the fridge and see what happens.

And I don't think it would make a difference but tell us about your process...maybe there's a clue in that.


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#557 Kerry Beal

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 08:14 PM

What Rob said - also be interested in how you put your ganache together.  What sort of temperatures are you getting it to?



#558 Lisa Shock

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 12:46 AM

The proportions seem fine. What brand of chocolate? What temperatures are involved? (burnt maybe?) Was the chocolate in temper when you started?



#559 chocofoodie

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 01:48 AM

This image shows the above recipeimage.jpg This image shows the same ganache but 6 oz chocolate and 6 oz cream

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#560 chocofoodie

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 01:52 AM

I heat up the cream with all the rest of the stuff until just before boiling and put it on top of the tempered chocolate pellets (cocoa Barry). I then wait before mixing gently. Maybe the problem is I add some hazelnut bits after this? I don't know with the first pic above, the undecorated ones, I actually attempted to repair the ganache by heating it and then by adding glucose syrup and finally by adding some milk and it still ended up looking like that.

#561 chocofoodie

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 01:55 AM

Oh I ended up adding about two
Ounces melted chocolate to it as well which is why this morning it's quite hard!

Oh and Rob:
I'm American even though I live in London lol! I'm actually comfortable with both but it just happens that I measured this out in ounces probably because I was looking at Andrew Shotts book.
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#562 chocofoodie

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 02:35 AM

The round one is the first try the 50:50 and the oval is the second botched attempt outlined above. I added butter and cocoa butter to improve mouth feel but neither has a nice mouth feel.

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#563 keychris

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 04:46 AM

I then wait before mixing gently.

 

The more movement your ganache gets, the finer the emulsion will be and the smoother the mouth feel will be. Try blitzing it with a stick blender or a food processor. This will also cause it to set firmer, iirc.


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#564 Kerry Beal

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 07:10 AM

What sort of shelf life do you need on this piece?  I'm wondering if you cut back on the cocoa butter and added a bit more of some other liquid to help with the emulsion.  What actual chocolate are you using - I find that some of the more acidic formulations are difficult to get into a good emulsion.



#565 chocofoodie

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 08:17 AM

The more movement your ganache gets, the finer the emulsion will be and the smoother the mouth feel will be. Try blitzing it with a stick blender or a food processor. This will also cause it to set firmer, iirc.


I thought too much agitation breaks the emulsion? So can I blitz it and then add the hazelnut chunks after?

#566 chocofoodie

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 08:21 AM

Kerry, shelf life is not a factor. They don't generally last more than three days lol!

The chocolate is not particularly acidic, it's the lowest dark chocolate the 55% or whatever I'll check it when I'm near it.

I think it's the way I incorporated the butter that may have broken the emulsion. I think I should add the butter after I've incorporated the cream into the chocolate. But this doesn't explain why I couldn't fix it.

#567 gfron1

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 11:21 AM

Typical sequence: Bring cream/glucose to simmer, very short rest (:30), pour over chocolate, short rest (:60), mix - like said above, I use either my food processor or a stick blender. I never stir by hand. Try it again and see if you never truly got the emulsion.


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#568 YetiChocolates

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Posted 09 March 2015 - 10:14 AM

Typical sequence: Bring cream/glucose to simmer, very short rest (:30), pour over chocolate, short rest (:60), mix - like said above, I use either my food processor or a stick blender. I never stir by hand. Try it again and see if you never truly got the emulsion.

 

Funny you should say that because I always mix by hand and as of late haven't had issues with improper emulsions, other than with my dairy free ones sometimes and I think that's a balance issue more than an emulsion issue.  I'm sure once I graduate to larger batches I'll forgo hand-mixing, but for now it's all I do.