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Fresh Morel mushrooms


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48 replies to this topic

#31 Dianabanana

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 10:09 AM

If you've ever gone morel hunting, you know that they are particularly susceptible to becoming buggy. The hollow core can be a welcoming home to hundreds of creepy little worms (maggots?).

A couple of years ago I accidentally discovered the ideal method of de-worming morels.

I had read that it is better for future crops if you use a basket or some other perforated container when gathering wild mushrooms, so that the spores can fall to the forest floor as you're walking along. Whether this is true or not I can't say, but I decided to use a nylon mesh lingerie bag to hold my morels. It works great--very gentle to the mushrooms.

I got home late and didn't have the energy to deal with cleaning the morels, so I hung the lingerie on a mug hook mounted on the underside of a kitchen cabinet and went to bed.

In the morning I walked into the kitchen and discovered that the kitchen counter under the bag was a revolting, writhing mass of tiny worms. I don't know what exactly would have caused them to jump ship en masse, but the fact remains that they did. The morels were absolutely clean.

#32 Magictofu

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 08:12 AM

I wrote a long post on the morel season at http://slurpandburp....rel-season.html

My best dish with morel was lobster in a morel beurre blanc: http://slurpandburp....vegetables.html

Now that I have to take care of a one year old baby and that I spend almost all my free tim digging in my garden, I hardly find the time to go mushroom hunting, even though it would probably take me 2 or 3 hours to visit my usual spots and collect over 100 mushrooms. I can't wait for my son to be old enough to enjoy mushroom hunting with his dad.

#33 tim

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 09:34 AM

Resurrecting this thread.

I just found some morels on my farm!!!  I will be picking them tonight when we get home.

I have tons of fresh asparagus, too.  Thinking about making a cream sauce with pasta.  How long to morels need to cook?  Are they as delicate as regular mushrooms? 

Tips please  :biggrin:

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Shelby,

Morel stems can remain very tough after sauteeing. Many people discard them or save them for the stock pot. I chop the stems and stew them in butter for 30 minutes, they become tender and have wonderful flavor.

The caps may be sauteed on medium for 5 minutes in butter. You may then add a little cream and reduce as desired. A longer saute in low heat does not reduce the flavor or damage the texture. Just do not let them dry out in your pan and they are very forgiving.

Tim

Edited by tim, 03 June 2008 - 09:35 AM.


#34 SobaAddict70

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 12:25 PM

They're wonderful sauteed in butter, and paired simply with either asparagus or fiddlehead ferns.

Or scallops. :wub:

#35 heidih

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:38 PM

These guys followed me home. Just had a few few minutes to grab lunch so have not cooked them yet. They were masses of them growing in the wells of the roses. Our field biologist (who is very careful) id'd them as true morels last year and the co-worker who pointed them out to me had some with eggs and cream last week. I have never eaten or cooked a morel so I am thinking super simple tonight. The co-worker simmered them in cream and then did a lightly scrambled egg on toasted homemade rustic wheat. Sounds good to me. Any other ideas for a simple use of just these few? I will be on the lookout for new young ones. There are quite a few that are darker on the rim and if you run your thumb across horizontally may be going towards mushy. I am clueless so all input welcome.

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#36 janeer

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:25 PM

well i am jealous. .They do shine when cooked in some cream. I like them with pasta, or simply on grilled French bread with herbs. They are good with shrimp too.

#37 heidih

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:06 PM

I simmered in cream and enjoyed on toasted whole grain bread with grinds of pepper - lovely The odd part is that I live in Los Angeles - not morel hunting territory :)

#38 sparrowgrass

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:17 AM

I was wondering where you were, to be finding morels in the winter. They came in with the mulch, no doubt.
sparrowgrass

#39 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:36 AM

When I was a kid my dad would get morels in the woods every spring. My mom never made them WITH anything, we just had sliced morels stewed in butter. All by themselves and served on a plate all by themselves. Every now and then, mom might stir a little cream into them but mostly it was the mushrooms all on their buttery lonesomeness. Eating them was a holy rite of spring. Not sure I ever ate anything better.

#40 rlibkind

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:27 PM

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1357676547.923020.jpg
Purchased last spring at Dane County Farmers Market, Madison, Wisconsin, during my annual visit to UW. For transport via the drive back to Philadelphia I sautéed in butter, then packed then in portion-sized freezer bags which I then froze and brought back East in a cooler loaded with dry ice and other Wisconsin freeze able goodies. I pull out a bag when I want, most recently to serve alongside a savory cristless quiche.
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#41 rotuts

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:31 PM

WoW!
rlibkind


as stunning as the Mush. gets.

did you get a supply of 'worms?'

I sure hope you did some stock or something from those stems!

many thanks for sharing!

now back to my pedestrian dinner ....

#42 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:32 PM

I was wondering where you were, to be finding morels in the winter. They came in with the mulch, no doubt.

My guess as well. The same thing happened to me when we re-did our front yard. I had a great steak with morels and Marsala crème fraîche sauce that day! Unfortunately this was a one-time occurrence.
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#43 heidih

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:11 PM

As a footnote - the gentleman who pointed the morels out to me noted that he cooked them two different ways. First simmered in milk and then turned into beaten eggs for a light scramble; second sauteed in oil. He thought the oil masked the delicate taste. Maybe butter would have been different. I was also wondering about some posts I read where the morels were allowed to dry out a bit. I ate mine within hours of picking and the taste/fragrance was clearly mushroomy in a nice way but at the same time quite delicate. Is there a preferred treatment after harvest? I ask in the event I find some more. As I noted they were in the rose wells which are in the sun so that was odd - it might just have been "all the stars aligning" for one harvest.

#44 janeer

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:38 PM

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1357676547.923020.jpg
Purchased last spring at Dane County Farmers Market, Madison, Wisconsin, during my annual visit to UW. For transport via the drive back to Philadelphia I sautéed in butter, then packed then in portion-sized freezer bags which I then froze and brought back East in a cooler loaded with dry ice and other Wisconsin freeze able goodies. I pull out a bag when I want, most recently to serve alongside a savory cristless quiche.

I have never seen anything like those!

#45 nibor

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:47 PM

As a footnote - the gentleman who pointed the morels out to me noted that he cooked them two different ways. First simmered in milk and then turned into beaten eggs for a light scramble; second sauteed in oil. He thought the oil masked the delicate taste. Maybe butter would have been different. I was also wondering about some posts I read where the morels were allowed to dry out a bit. I ate mine within hours of picking and the taste/fragrance was clearly mushroomy in a nice way but at the same time quite delicate. Is there a preferred treatment after harvest? I ask in the event I find some more. As I noted they were in the rose wells which are in the sun so that was odd - it might just have been "all the stars aligning" for one harvest.

I grew up finding & eating morels. We cleaned them, sliced them, sauteed them in butter and ate them ASAP. Never thought of waiting.

#46 LaurieB

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:40 PM

Some good friends gifted us last season with some morels and this is what I gifted back:

CREAMED MORELS ON BRIOCHE
¼ pound morels, trimmed and sliced

1 clove garlic, minced

1 ½ T. butter

½ cup dry red wine

½ cup heavy cream

S and P, q b

2 brioche rolls

Slice the tops off the brioche, hollow out insides. Brush with melted butter

and bake at 350* til toasted. Reserve.



Saute the morels in butter til soft. Add garlic. Add wine and cook til

wine is nearly evaporated. Add the cream and cook until

slightly thickened. Salt and pepper to taste.


Serve hot in the hot brioche.

#47 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:54 AM

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1357676547.923020.jpg
Purchased last spring at Dane County Farmers Market, Madison, Wisconsin, during my annual visit to UW. For transport via the drive back to Philadelphia I sautéed in butter, then packed then in portion-sized freezer bags which I then froze and brought back East in a cooler loaded with dry ice and other Wisconsin freeze able goodies. I pull out a bag when I want, most recently to serve alongside a savory cristless quiche.


Wow! I never saw anything like THAT in the Washington woods. Brobdinagian morels grow in the midwest! Are they tougher than smaller ones?

#48 Alex

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:18 PM


ImageUploadedByTapatalk1357676547.923020.jpg
Purchased last spring at Dane County Farmers Market, Madison, Wisconsin, during my annual visit to UW. For transport via the drive back to Philadelphia I sautéed in butter, then packed then in portion-sized freezer bags which I then froze and brought back East in a cooler loaded with dry ice and other Wisconsin freeze able goodies. I pull out a bag when I want, most recently to serve alongside a savory cristless quiche.


Wow! I never saw anything like THAT in the Washington woods. Brobdinagian morels grow in the midwest! Are they tougher than smaller ones?

It's all those nuclear power reactors nearby.
Gene Weingarten, writing in The Washington Post about online news stories and their readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

"A vasectomy might cost as much as a year’s worth of ice cream, but that doesn’t mean it’s equally enjoyable." -Ezra Dyer, NY Times

#49 rlibkind

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 02:39 PM

Not tough at all since they were very fresh. Some of these had fruiting bodies of 5-6 inches, not counting the stems. The stems were only slightly tougher. Ans these had no worms, just an occasional bug (good protein!). The per pound price worked out to about $35, almost half what I'd pay at a Philadelphia farmer's market or produce stall at the Reading Terminal Market.

Creamed on toast/brioche is a definite winner, as is just about any egg dish. Most memorable I've ever had was about a dozen years ago at Madison's L'Etoile where morels, other spring mushrooms and asparagus were sauced with a beurre blanc around a ring of savory flan.
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