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Cooking with "All About Braising" by Molly Stevens (Part 1)

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#511 Della

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:39 PM

I left the pork in and it came out great!

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I made sandwiches with Sao Bing (Chinese sesame seed biscuits)

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LOOKS WONDERFUL!! I am definately trying this one soon. The only time I have cooked with pork belly (besides making bacon) is the Pork Belly with Ginger, Honey and Soy out of the "Rover's" book. Your pictures are making me hungry!

#512 Della

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:46 PM

Marlene: Your recipe for short ribs was absolutely delicious! I made the ribs and sauce over the weekend and refrigerated them separately. Since we have a visiting dog, I came home for lunch, combined the ribs and sauce, and popped the lot into a slow oven. Arriving home from work, we were greeted by delicious smells and fully-cooked dinner. The boys couldn’t wait to tear into the ribs, so no pictures.

The weather is now more suited to grilling than braising, so thanks for helping to end the braising season on a high note.

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We just made the Braised Short Ribs in Porter Ale with Maple-Rosemary Glaze last night and they were VERY good. The prep is easy and fast and I think this is the easiest short rib recipe I have ever made. I did use chix stock rather than beef as that is all I had on hand and I think that beef or veal stock would have made the sauce just that much richer. I was patient however and really spent the time to reduce it to a syrupy consistancy and we really liked it. The glaze is a nice touch but I think it needs "something" but not sure what..........any thoughts out there? All in all - I would make again.
Cooking time/temp worked out on this one for me - I kept the oven at 275 instead of the 300. Oh - and I had a TON of liquid. I should have let the porter and chix stock boil a few minutes longer but it didn' hurt my meat! :biggrin:

My favorite short rib recipe is out of Jerry Traunfelds's "The Herbfarm Cookbook". It take much longer to make (prep-wise) but I am just addicited to it.

Next up in a few weeks is to try Marlene's short rib recipe. I didn't get to it last winter and I am excited to try it.

Marlene - if you are reading this would you consider bumping up your recipe? I know it is many pages back thread.........and I am only pleading laziness on my part to go and find it.

#513 Della

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:49 PM

Made the Zinfandel Pot Roast with glazed carrots this weekend, and MAN was that good. The sauce gets so flavorful with the wine and aromatics, I could have happily drunk a glass. Also, it's the first time I've successfully glazed anything.

As always, adjusted the recommended temps downward.

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I agree - it is a wonderful dish. And the fresh herbs at the end just make it that much better. Viva la herb!

#514 chezcherie

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:50 PM

i'm not marlene, but i, too, am dying to try her short ribs...if it ever gets to be braining weather here in southern CA...so i have it bookmarked.
marlene's short rib recipe
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#515 Della

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:51 PM

I've made some good stuff from this book also. The braised brussel sprouts are really good - but then I like them.
Nice to see you posting again Marlene.

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thx! I wasn't home much this summer. Now it's time to bring out Molly's book again and get braising, which is my favourite way to cook in the winter. (I'm still not all that sure about this curdled milk thing though) :huh:

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The first time I tried braising in milk was with a Jamie Oliver recipe for Chicken wiht Lemon and Sage. I was scared......but intrigued......... :shock: I tend to be afraid of things with curds in them (texture, texture, texture) but it was really good!!!
Haven't tried Molly's yet but it is on the fall list.

#516 Della

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:52 PM

i'm not marlene, but i, too, am dying to try her short ribs...if it ever gets to be braining weather here in southern CA...so i have it bookmarked.
marlene's short rib recipe

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THANK YOU!!!!

#517 Della

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:56 PM

Ok - I am obviously excited that fall is here as I just took up a page and a half on this thread........please forgive me!!! :rolleyes:

Tonight I am making the Chicken Do-Piaza. I have only made one thing ever with Tumeric and am looking forward to seeing how this turns out.
I haven't made ghee before......is it worth making or will the alternate vegetable oil do just as well?

#518 Live It Up

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 02:07 PM

The chicken do-piaza was the first dish I made out of this book, and it was really good. If I recall, I just used regular butter. The reason to use ghee would be the higher smoke point, but I didn't have any problems with the milk solids burning. I do think that the butter flavor is important to the dish, though.

#519 Marlene

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 02:27 PM

i'm not marlene, but i, too, am dying to try her short ribs...if it ever gets to be braining weather here in southern CA...so i have it bookmarked.
marlene's short rib recipe

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THANK YOU!!!!

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The recipe is also easily findable in RecipeGullet

and just in case you've forgotten what they look like :biggrin:
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Edited by Marlene, 17 September 2006 - 07:28 PM.

Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#520 Bella S.F.

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 05:26 PM

Has anyone ever tried the short ribs using boneless short ribs? I know, the bones add a lot of flavor. However, Costco has really nice boneless short ribs, and hey, Julia Child loved the meat from Costco. Just wondered if anyone has tried it.
BTY, they come in long portions so you can cut them to any size you want. Is that appalling?
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#521 Marlene

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 05:52 PM

I have never seen boneless short ribs at Costco. Then again, I've never seen short ribs at Costco. It must be an American Costco thing. Canadian costco's just don't seem to carry them. I'd say, yes you could use them but a couple of things, you may not get quite as much flavour without the bone, but a good reduction sauce will help with that. Make sure the ribs do have a good fat layer because you'll need that for flavour as well. If the boneless ribs are scrawny and fatless, pass on by.

I tie the bone in ones because they've been known to fall apart on me after braising for four hours. I'd probably tie boneless ones as well.

Edited by Marlene, 18 September 2006 - 05:54 PM.

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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#522 forever_young_ca

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 08:00 AM

I made the "Braised Halibut Steaks with Creamy Leeks" for supper last night. It was delicious. The leeks cooked to a very soft, creamy succulent texture and the halibut was perfecty cooked while still being moist.

I followed the receipe exactly (unusual, but true).

This one is a keeper. I will also try it with salmon.
Life is short, eat dessert first

#523 lennyk

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 09:52 AM

I did the lamb shanks with curry, came out pretty good, my lamb shanks
were cut in sections so was able to suck out the marrow too.

#524 chezcherie

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 09:59 AM

Has anyone ever tried the short ribs using boneless short ribs? I know, the bones add a lot of flavor. However, Costco has really nice boneless short ribs, and hey, Julia Child loved the meat from Costco. Just wondered if anyone has tried it.
BTY, they come in long portions so you can cut them to any size you want. Is that appalling?

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i did them this weekend. of course, i prefer the bone-in ribs, but the costco ones lured me because (1) i was there and (2) they looked awfully good, even without their bones. they were fabulous....i took them to a friend's house, and even though we had had a million appetizers, people were groaning over their goodness, and fighting over the left-overs. reallly, really tasty and tender. i braised them about 3 1/2 hours and did not tie them. (i added a touch of tomato paste when sauteing the veg, but otherwise followed the recipe faithfully.)
thanks, marlene...can't wait to do them again...hopefully it will be braising weather here soon!
"Laughter is brightest where food is best."
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Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

#525 Abra

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 01:39 PM

I'm here to vouch for hhlodesign's braised pork belly and sao bing sandwiches. That's one of the best pork sandwiches I've ever tasted in my life!

We're getting another week of sunny and warm days, but braising weather is just around the corner, and I have some beautiful short ribs in the freezer.

#526 Marlene

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 03:37 PM

i did them this weekend. of course, i prefer the bone-in ribs, but the costco ones lured me because (1) i was there and (2) they looked awfully good, even without their bones. they were fabulous....i took them to a friend's house, and even though we had had a million appetizers, people were groaning over their goodness, and fighting over the left-overs. reallly, really tasty and tender. i braised them about 3 1/2 hours and did not tie them. (i added a touch of tomato paste when sauteing the veg, but otherwise followed the recipe faithfully.)
thanks, marlene...can't wait to do them again...hopefully it will be braising weather here soon!

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Glad you liked them! They truly are my favourite way to braise short ribs.
Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#527 Rover

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 05:48 PM

I made the Lamb Shanks Braised with Lentils & Curry and really liked it, so did my guests. Molly's recommendation of "passing lemon wedges or a small cruet of good-quality red wine vinegar at the table" was an excellent suggestion - it does add a nice little zing to the finished dish.

The description of earthy flavours is entirely accurate and those elegant little Le Puy lentils work very well.

I'll keep this in my ever expanding lamb shank collection.

I'm going to be enjoying some leftovers this evening.

Rover

#528 eje

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 10:30 AM

Red Cooked a whole bone in pork shoulder last night.

For a sauce, I added about 3/4 pounds of seeded fresh jujubes (Chinese Dates) near the end of the cooking time, cooked until soft, pulled them out, and pureed them with some of the braising liquid.

So tasty!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#529 eje

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 02:00 PM

Forgot, my wife took some pictures of our dinner preparations.

Shelling (cranberry?) beans:

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Dragonfruit (jujubes in bag in backgroud):

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Adding Jujubes to cooking pork shoulder:

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Cranberry beans, Tuscan Kale, and pork hock:

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Dragonfruit, cut:

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Yeah, the courses were a little schizo with the roast pork with jujube sauce being Asian in style and the greens and beans being American/Southern. Our friends brought mashed sweet potatoes over as the starch.

Strangely, everything tasted really good together. I guess I got lucky.

The dragonfruit was a post-dessert treat.

Edited by eje, 01 October 2006 - 04:14 PM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#530 Marlene

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 05:51 PM

Made the Caribbean Pork Shoulder from Molly's book on Saturday night. This recipe continues to be one of my favourites.

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Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#531 tejon

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 07:53 PM

I made Chicken and Pork Adobado tonight. Delicious, though the pork didn't get as tender as I would have liked in the amount of time given. Next time I would start the pork simmering first, giving it about a 15-20 minute head start on the chicken and braising for an hour and fifteen minutes instead of the 40-50 minutes suggested. This one is a keeper, with slight modification.
Kathy

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#532 Eilen

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 02:19 PM

I just got this book for my birthday and decided to start off simple with the Yankee Pot Roast Redux. It's still in the oven but it smells great and the little piece of meat I couldn't resist tearing off was delicious. I've always used the Cook's Illustrated method for pot roast but not anymore! Excellent time of year to acquire this kind of cookbook...

#533 snowangel

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 02:34 PM

I just got this book for my birthday and decided to start off simple with the Yankee Pot Roast Redux.  It's still in the oven but it smells great and the little piece of meat I couldn't resist tearing off was delicious.  I

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In our house, I don't tear off pieces, rather they just "fall" off :laugh: .

Do go through this topic and make notes in the book. I think there's a general consensus that she recommends too high a temp. This topic has lots of hints on how to get the most out of the recipes and perhaps improve on them. I gave copies of the book last year for Christmas to my three close college buddies, and sat and made notes in each on on the recipes that needed notes!
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#534 Della

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 03:47 PM

I made the chicking fricassee with artichokes and and mushrooms the other night and it was really good! The flavors melded together and the sauce was to die for (at least IMHO). Definately a keeper!
Dropped oven temp to 300 but other than that did the recipe exactly as directed.

#535 Chufi

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Posted 07 October 2006 - 12:33 PM

Made the chicken with soy sauce, star anise and orange today. I always have good, thick syrupy ketjap manis in the pantry, so I used that instead of the soy sauce and sugar. I do feel that soy sauce and sugar is definitely not the same as ketjap manis, so if you can find ketjap I would highly recommend using it for this recipe.
I used a fresh hot chili, chopped up, and before thickening the sauce with cornstarch I strained it because I wanted a smooth sauce.
The chicken came out very tender and flavorful, and the sauce is fantastic.. I wanted to spoon it up like soup. Beautiful flavors from the anise and the orange.

Edited by Chufi, 08 October 2006 - 09:43 AM.


#536 Eilen

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Posted 08 October 2006 - 09:38 AM

Do go through this topic and make notes in the book.  I think there's a general consensus that she recommends too high a temp.  This topic has lots of hints on how to get the most out of the recipes and perhaps improve on them.  I gave copies of the book last year for Christmas to my three close college buddies, and sat and made notes in each on on the recipes that needed notes!

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Thank you Susan, I shall do just that. I actually did start off at 300F, then turned my oven down to 275F for the last couple of hours. The meat turned out great--I used a chuck roast--the liquid was a bit too salty but that was my fault. :hmmm:

#537 Jensen

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Posted 08 October 2006 - 11:22 AM

I feel like I'm a little late to the party but I am so ready to start braising!

My old non-stick hard anodized braising pan has been relegated to the shop (the non-stick surface lifted), to be replaced with Daniel Boulud's braising roaster (can't afford Le Crueset). Amazon tells me that it shipped yesterday.

In anticipation of its arrival, I visited Tawanda Meats' web page and ordered their "Winter Warmers" package.

This thread is just filled with great tips. Now I just need a copy of the book!

#538 Anko

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 08:13 AM

What a terrific thread! Time to finally get my feet wet...

Chengdu Pork with Daikon Radish

We frequent a great Szechuan restaurant here in Palatine, Illinois, so I wanted to try this dish. The key is the Szechuan peppercorns, which took an afternoon to find.

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The twist here is that the braise happens with the lid off (so then is it really a braise?) which I suppose, concentrates the heat. And given the end result, that might not have been too desirable.

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As for the end product, it was fantastic. It was strange getting those "mysterious" Szechuan flavors at home. However, I didn't get feeling back in my tongue and gums for a few days, so I'll probably cut back on the hot bean paste and peppercorns a little next time. But I guess that would be missing the point.

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Next up: Pork Belly and Boy Choy
Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about.
Troy McClure, hosting the film, The Meat Council Presents: Meat and You - Partners in Freedom

#539 snowangel

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 10:20 AM

Meant to add that I did the Coq au Vin the other night. It is a mighty tasty, but not very visually appealing dish, as shown here.

The only change (other than temp) that I would make in this recipe is that I would not include chicken breasts. Add some extra thighs and save the breasts for something else. Or, add them later in the braise.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#540 Chufi

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 11:31 AM

Made the end-of-summer green beans today and they were fantastic. Even my husband who doesn't really like green beans loved them. They braised for an hour and were really sweet and succulent.
I followed the recipe exactly except .. :biggrin: I used fresh thyme instead of dried oregano.
I did have to boil quite vigurously at the end to concentrate the sauce.

A keeper!





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